From the Pen of David Horowitz: October 14, 2009


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One of the conclusions reached in Unholy Alliance is that contemporary leftism is, in fact, largely a nihilism. Since the collapse of socialism – and really since the collapse of the international Communist monolith after the Khrushchev Report – the left hasn’t had a coherent unifying agenda. It has been split into many protesting factions with no common remedies for the ills they see, a left balkanized by “identity politics.” This is a consequence of the decline of Marxist class politics, which subsumed all radical agendas in regard to race, gender and ethnicity, into universal formula of socialist revolution. The elimination of private property and the rule of the working class would create a universal brotherhood of man that would resolve also serious social conflicts. Few leftists, even, believe this destructive illusion anymore.

The left in other words is not only a movement and perspective formed by its ideals and political hopes, but also by its oppositions. Anti-war leftists of the Sixties may have described themselves as “anarchists” and democratic socialists, but the effect of their anti-war activities was to establish brutal police states in Cambodia and Vietnam that slaughtered masses of innocents.

Defining the Left

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