Is Massachusetts Finally Demanding Character from its Leaders?


The real "Change" Massachusetts wants may be a change away from sleaziness.

While Democrat Senate candidate Martha Coakley may never match the colorful history of the last guy to hold the seat she wants, her record shows that, if elected, she would bring a morally odious air all her own to the Senate.  Last night, Sean Hannity reported on a disturbing child abuse case, and then-District Attorney Coakley’s responses:

Hannity cites the Boston Globe’s report on the scandal, which says:

In October 2005, a Somerville police officer living in Melrose raped his 23-month-old niece with a hot object, most likely a curling iron. Keith Winfield, then 31, told police he was alone with the toddler that day and made additional statements that would ultimately be used to convict him.

But in the aftermath of the crime, a Middlesex County grand jury overseen by Martha Coakley, then the district attorney, investigated without taking action. It was only after the toddler’s mother filed applications for criminal complaints that Coakley won grand jury indictments charging rape and assault and battery.

Even then, nearly 10 months after the crime, Coakley’s office recommended that Winfield be released on personal recognizance, with no cash bail. He remained free until December 2007, when Coakley’s successor as district attorney won a conviction and two life terms.

Hannity reports that Larry Frisoli, her unsuccessful GOP challenger for attorney general in 2006, accused Coakley of going easy on Winfield because his father was a powerful union leader and possible Coakley campaign backer.  The late Frisoli’s brother offers more details of the case in the interview.

But her dubious legal record doesn’t end there.  The Wall Street Journal reports that “the Democratic Senate candidate was far from relentless when investigating fellow politicians,” and on December 9, Ann Coulter wrote about Coakley’s shocking role in the case of Gerald Amirault, an innocent man sent to prison for child molsetation:

In July 2001, the notoriously tough Massachusetts parole board voted unanimously to grant Gerald Amirault clemency. Although the parole board is not permitted to consider guilt or innocence, its recommendation said: “(I)t is clearly a matter of public knowledge that, at the minimum, real and substantial doubt exists concerning petitioner’s conviction.”

Immediately after the board’s recommendation, The Boston Globe reported that Gov. Jane Swift was leaning toward accepting the board’s recommendation and freeing Amirault.

Enter Martha Coakley, Middlesex district attorney. Gerald Amirault had already spent 15 years in prison for crimes he no more committed than anyone reading this column did. But Coakley put on a full court press to keep Amirault in prison simply to further her political ambitions.

By then, every sentient person knew that Amirault was innocent. But instead of saying nothing, Coakley frantically lobbied Gov. Jane Swift to keep him in prison to show that she was a take-no-prisoners prosecutor, who stood up for “the children.” As a result of Coakley’s efforts — and her contagious ambition — Gov. Swift denied Amirault’s clemency.

Dan Riehl has even more.  It seems that Republican challenger Scott Brown’s “stunning” success in the polls and fundraising may have less to do with national politics and more to do with Massachusetts voters finally deciding the stench is too much to bear.

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Hailing from Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, Calvin Freiburger is a political science major at Hillsdale College.  He also blogs at the Hillsdale Forum and his personal website, Calvin Freiburger Online.



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