Can the Cant: 9-11 Was Always Already Politicized


From the pages of the Washington Times comes an article filled with hand wringing over the GZ Mosque and Qur-B-Que controversies, quoting various people lamenting the politicization of 9-11. 9-11 has always been political, though.

Oh, yes, the reasons for the wanton massacre of thousands in the Twin Towers, the Pentagon and on various commercial airliners have mutated depending on the exigencies of the moment. I seem to recall that it was once outrage over the US military presence in Saudi Arabia, the breeding ground of the Wahabbist death cult. Mind you, the whole nation is “sacred,” but we mustn’t insist on moving a mosque from two blocks from Ground Zero.

Mecca is so sacred that no non-Muslim must set foot there, and Medina is sacred. Jerusalem is so sacred to Muslims that any relics of prior Jewish settlement ought to be extirpated, in a slow-motion version of the destruction of the Bamiyan Buddhas. Cordoba’s cathedral ought to be opened to Muslim worship, because at one time, in contravention of an agreement with Cordoba’s Christians, Muslims worshipped there before suffering a series of territorial reverses. Bethlehem is largely devoid of Christians, and the few remaining Jews in numerous Muslim territories are leaving due to oppression.

So, when I hear this sort of thing, I wonder:

New York Archbishop Timothy Dolan spoke out Friday against Saturday’s planned New York protests, saying Sept. 11 “has become a holy day in our community and our nation.”

“We must never allow Sept. 11th to become a time for protest and division,” he added. “Instead, this day must remain a time for promoting peace and mutual respect.”

Where is the mutuality?

At Gettysburg, Lincoln, without benefit of teleprompter, said this:

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate — we can not consecrate — we can not hallow — this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us — that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion — that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain — that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

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