Heart and Soul: Remembering a Dissident


Let me join David Swindle in saying that you owe it to yourself to read Jamie Glazov’s warm and gripping tribute to his father, Yuri Glazov, a scholar and dissident who stood up to the Soviet machine even as it moved to crush him.

David writes, “Jamie has finally written the kind of piece I’ve been bugging him to do for months…”

Here’s a sample of why:

On February 24, 1968, my father signed the Letter of Twelve, a letter written and signed by twelve Soviet dissidents to the Supreme Congress of Communist Parties in Budapest denouncing Soviet human rights abuses. He was immediately fired from his work for being “unprofessional” in his scholarly studies (even though he previously had received high praise for his academic studies).

…During this time, a friend of our family’s told my dad that, under vicious harassment by the KGB (they had discovered an affair she was having and threatened to tell her husband), she had agreed to be a witness for them in a trial against my father that would charge (and convict) him of selling foreign currency and drugs on the black market (which she would place in our apartment).

Consider this the official beginning of my lobbying effort to Jamie to turn this brave and compelling family saga into a book—a true and lasting memorial to his father.

In the meantime, you can help keep the legacy of this brave man alive.  Dr. Glazov taught for more than two decades at Canada’s Dalhousie University, and a memorial scholarship was established in his name.  However, as Jamie writes:

My father’s career at Dalhousie lasted twenty years – until his retirement in 1995. To honor his memory, a memorial award was established in his name. But funding for this award has been scarce and now the possibility has emerged that it will be shut down. This memorial fund is really the only marker in existence that publicly keeps alive who my dad was, what he did, and what he represented. It symbolizes the struggle of all dissidents for truth and for freedom. If some funds begin to materialize, the memorial award for my father can remain in existence. I would like to put a request to all of you who care and who can help, to kindly click on this site at Dalhousie to read about the Yuri Glazov Memorial Award and to contribute in any way you can – and even the smallest contribution will count a lot.

We all enjoy the freedom of the “new media” to get online and express our opinions, advocate for freedom, and rail against the prevailing academic culture which ignores the contributions of brave men like Yuri Glazov, while it celebrates those who would collaborate with evil like Ward Churchill and Howard Zinn.

So, here is your chance to actually do something about it.  How about it?  Let’s put our money where are keyboards are.