From the Writings of David Horowitz: April 23, 2010


From its opening image, Rogue State proceeds to dismiss the idea that the Cold War was a conflict between nuclear superpowers or a contest between totalitarianism and freedom. Instead Rogue State presents the Cold War as the concoction of a single omnipotent power – a power whose ends are predatory and evil – able to manipulate events in order to establish its global rule:

For 79 years the United States convinced much of the world that there was an international conspiracy out there. An International Communist Conspiracy (italics in original) seeking no less than control over the entire planet for purposes which had no socially redeeming values. And the world was made to believe that it somehow needed the United States to save it from communist darkness. ‘Just buy our weapons,’ said Washington, ‘let our military and our corporations roam freely across your land, and give us veto power over whom your leaders will be, and we’ll protect you…’1

There is no discernible difference between this view of America’s role in the Cold War and the crudest Communist caricature manufactured in the Kremlin at its height; between the Stalinism of a Herbert Aptheker and the “anarchism” of a Noam Chomsky or the “progressivism” of a Howard Zinn – or the views expressed on scores of Internet websites like Indymedia.org, commondreams.org, counter-punch.org and zmag.org, which serve as the organizing venues of the “anti-war” movement.2 When it comes to the perception of American policy and its purposes, these views are substantively the same: American policy and purpose are controlled by a corporate ruling class whose guiding interest is profit and plunder. External enemies are “mythical;” they serve merely as a smokescreen for suppressing revolts against the empire. Thus, in a booklet that has sold 160,000 copies called What Uncle Sam Really Wants, Chomsky writes: “[After World War II] US planners recognized that the ‘threat’ in Europe was not Soviet aggression … but rather the worker- and peasant-based antifascist resistance with its radical democratic ideals, and the political power and appeal of the local Communist parties.”3

The resistance movements Chomsky refers to, such as those in France and Greece, were dominated by Communists; their “radical democrat ideas” were to establish Soviet satellites and totalitarian states. The views of Chomsky, Zinn and Blum, which accurately reflect the political culture of the actual organizers of the movement against the war in Iraq4 reprise the Stalinist propaganda line during the Cold War and are based on long discredited Marxist analyses of the democratic West. These views demonize America as a satanic force in the modern world, the lynchpin of a global order of hierarchy and privilege that is responsible for the misery of the world’s impoverished masses.

As long as America continues to maintain the will and ability to protect what radicals regard as the global order of “social injustice,” all reforms and social advances will be illusory. This is the meaning of Nicholas DeGenova’s claim that all progressives should wish for the defeat of American power in Iraq and elsewhere because America can have no place in a world that is at peace and just.

-- Unholy Alliance

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