From the Writings of David Horowitz: February 11, 2010


I am generally a forgiving soul. If treated half-decently by my opponents I am prepared to overlook many of their indecencies because I understand they come from a place of self-righteous zeal that often overwhelms their better judgment and inspires them to be nasty and dishonest in their service of their political agendas. After all, they’re saving the world.

It is their delusional fantasies of social justice that not only prompted progressives to invent the “politics of personal destruction” but to resort to it as their first and often only weapon. It is also what inspires them to have so little loyalty to community or country, and no respect at all for the truth.

Max is the latest in a line of Blumenthal character assassins who invent the facts to feed their malicious designs. His father once compressed four lies about me in a single sentence. I don’t know if Sid actually instructed his son to continue the dirty work he had begun on my case, but one day little Max showed up on my political doorstep so to speak.

By now I have lost track of how many times he went into print or onto the web to defame me but his last column falsely cast me as the godfather of the ABC miniseries “Path to 9/11” in order to misrepresent it as a right-wing anti-Clinton plot. In fact, the ABC producer who fought hardest for the film was a gay liberal who voted for Clinton (to whom the film was overly tender). As for myself, I was not even aware of the film’s existence until after it was completed. These Max mistakes were bad enough. But when I posted a response correcting the errors, he simply ignored it.

Mad Max: An Inherited Genetic Disorder Returns

Be sure and read the whole article from which this excerpt is taken. Also read Matthew Vadum’s Blumenthal post from yesterday. And check out Vadum’s newest Blumenthal rebuttal today.

If you have a favorite Horowitz quote you want to highlight for others then click here to submit. Please include:

  • “Horowitz Quote of the Day” in subject line.
  • A link to where the quote is from. (No need to include this if it’s from a book.)
  • Any remarks you’d like published explaining what value you take from it.
  • Your preferred name and a link to your blog or homepage (if you have one.)