If Mexico Falls


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Frontpage Interview’s guest today is Glynn Custred, Professor Emeritus at California State University East Bay, Hayward and a member of the American Anthropological Association and the Association of Borderland Studies.

FP: Glynn Custred, welcome to Frontpage Interview.

I would like to talk to you today about what is happening in Mexico and the consequences on the United States. There is surely a crisis at hand, seeing how, among other things, the Department of Homeland Security recently issued a statement declaring that the U.S. government does not have “effective control” of the U.S.-Mexico border.

Let’s begin with this question:

Is Mexico a failing state?

Custred: Thanks Jamie.

Mexicans bristle at the mention of Mexico as a failed state. Yet if we look at what is going on down there, this designation seems more and more appropriate. The Global Policy Forum describes a failed state as one that “can no longer perform basic functions such as education, security, or governance,” a situation which comes about for various reasons. One is fractious violence within the country that leads to a breakdown in normal state operations, and in the emergence of informal markets that operate beyond the state’s ability to tax and regulate. Banditry also increases and often powerful non-government forces, such as warlords or drug cartels, dominate certain regions of the country. That is what is happening in Mexico today. You can read about it in open sources. The Los Angeles Times has been particularly good at reporting the story in a series they have titled “Mexico under Siege.”

FP: How did Mexico fall under siege?

Custred: The process began in Mexico when the drug cartels struck back at President Felipe Calderon when he tried to bring them under control. Local officials have been murdered and local police have been corrupted. Many police now serve as armed agents of the cartels, and not as agents of the government and guardians of public order. For example, six municipal officers in the state of Nuevo Leon were recently arrested for complicity in the assassination of a local mayor. State and federal police and the Mexican army have confronted local police at gun point, and further evidence of police collusion is piling up every day.

The failure of local government finally reached the point where President Calderon launched an initiative to amend the constitution so that he can eliminate the country’s 2,000 municipal police departments. If the measure passes, the duties of local authorities will be performed by state and federal police.

But state and federal police are also subject to bribery and are under vicious assault by the cartels. Policemen are routinely murdered, brutal scenes of torture have been shown on the internet by the cartels and victims have been decapitated to intimidate the authorities and the local population. By now the situation has gone far beyond that of a police matter. The Mexican army is now engaged in what has become an internal war for control of the Mexican state. President Calderon admitted this when he said that it is clear that the cartels mean to take over.

Journalists are also murdered and terrorized into silence and innocent people have been killed around the country in the cross-fire between rival gangs and government forces. In all, 28,000 people have died in the last four years in the violence, more than in active war zones around the world.

Federal authorities themselves have also been corrupted even at the highest levels, raising the question of how deep the cartels have already penetrated into the most reliable branches of the Mexican government. Corruption on that level affects not just the government’s struggle with the cartels, but its ability to perform routine duties in many sectors of the country. The deteriorating situation in Mexico certainly fits the description of a failing state whether those in power on both sides of the border are willing to admit it.

The failure of the Mexican state is not just speculation. In December 2008 the United States Joint Forces Command issued a strategic evaluation of threats facing the United States. The report warned, in a worst case scenario, of the “rapid and sudden” collapse of two major states, Pakistan and Mexico. Former drug czar General Barry McCaffry has also commented on the seriousness of the situation, saying that the Mexican state is fighting for its survival, and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton recently described the violence in Mexico as an insurgency. Presumably the powerful, wealthy and well armed cartels would like to harness the state to its growing criminal enterprises. If they succeed, we will find ourselves dealing with a narco-state on our southern flank. In the process, the United States will have to deal with problems arising from a weakened, perhaps even a failed state right next door.

FP: What are the consequences to the United States?

Custred: Admiral Mike Mullen chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff is concerned about security in the United States posed by the situation in Mexico. One threat is that terrorists will take advantage of well established smuggling networks to pass weapons and personnel into the United States. The out-of-control border also encourages the movement back and forth of criminal elements, many organized into vicious transnational gangs that are extending their operations from Central America, through Mexico and throughout the United States even to Canada, a NGO no one in those countries wants to succeed.

The smuggling networks that operate across the border are the results of the intertwining, and in some cases, of the merger of drug the people smuggling enterprises. The United States government, under both Democrat and Republican administrations, is partially to blame through their stubborn refusal to abide by the rule of law on the southern border. One consequence is the threat to American institutions of the same kind of corruption that has neutralized or co-opted their counterparts on the other side of the line. In fact, this has already started to happen. In that respect, and in ceding control of part of our sovereign territory to extra-legal forces, you might say that the U.S. is also a failed state, at least in that part of the country and in that aspect of its operation.

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  • Chezwick_Mac

    Let's everyone remember Colombia in the late 80s/early 90s….

    The Medellin cartel was forcing farmers to grow opium and coca for the production of heroine and cocaine respectively, to be exported to the States for tens of billions annually. Those who refused to comply were often found floating down the Cauca River…(the number of bodies were so numerous that the river was effectively polluted).

    'Los Extraditables' (the Extraditables), led by Pablo Escobar, were busy bombing airplanes, killing prospective Presidents (Louis Galan), using guerrillas to invade the Palace of Justice, terrorizing the country at every turn. Everyone assumed Colombia was lost, but it turned to America for help and through eradication programs and aggressive police and military action, the Medellin cartel (and later, the Cali Cartel) were decimated through attrition. Escobar was killed in '93.

    Mexico's only real hope in this battle is the same kind of large-scale US technical assistance that saved Colombia, but because of a shared border and an unhappy history of conquests and interventions, it is much more politically taboo for a Mexican President to openly solicit direct American intervention. Still, I can't think of alternatives.

    In the end, Mexico has to decide what is the lessor of two evils, the blow to national pride in turning to the hated Yankee for help, or the surrender to those countrymen who kill en mass their own people without a hint of reservation, whose pathology knows no ethical or practical bounds, and who in the end will sound the death knell for Mexico's hopes for a stable, democratic order.

    • JesseCollinsii

      You are some SMART guy. Your posts as comments should be elevated to the publisher's editorial ranks.

      • Chezwick_Mac

        You're way too generous, Jesse, but thanks just the same.

    • coyote3

      Know a lot of people in Mexico. The "Yanqui" is not necessarily "hated". If it weren't for the Tejanos' war of independence against Mexico, I would be a "Mexican". It is, however, a fierce national pride, just like that of the U.S. However, Mexico squandered it opportunity, and has never had a "stable, democratic order." In fact, when the Mexican War came to a conclusion, a lot of Mexicans, in Northern Mexico, asked the U.S. Army, "why did you stop?" There will U.S. intervention in Mexico, big time, in the near future. There is no other alternative. Either Mexico wil come to the U.S. for help, or it will get so bad that they won't even question the intervention.

      • Chezwick_Mac

        1) The last two elections in Mexico were both stable AND democratic…but anyway, I referred only to Mexico's "hope" for a stable, democratic order

        2) Mexican school books still teach Mexico's children that the American Southwest was "stolen" and the country has growing aspirations – based on migration – for a reconquista of the region

        3) I think you're absolutely right, Mexico does not have the capacity or the will to overcome its narco-terrorists. US intervention, on one level or another, is inevitable

    • aspacia

      Won't happen under Obama's watch.

  • Cuban Refugee

    The question in your title could have been posed years ago when Mexico was floundering as a corrupt society. However, today, we could have a declarative sentence: Mexico has fallen. It is a lawless country overrun by the rabid dogs of drug justice. Our Southern states had better prepare for a wave of Mexican citizens — no longer just the indigent masses –as they flee the hell that has darkened the former paradise for tourists. There are not too many places left for leisure travel in this upside down world. Oh, but we can look forward to the utopian New World Order when there will be no borders; then, we will ponder not only about Mexico's fallen state, but also about our own.

    • http://www.mysapce.com/freddawes1776/ Fred Dawes

      it is just time before we have a war with mexico and not its low life government but with its millions on top of millions, but the question is when mexico city falls, we will become mexico.
      Our government is much like the government of mexico in the 1960's and with millions coming here each year the people of mexico will stand with its own people and anyone getting in the way of total political and race corruption will be attacked for many reason one being race.

      the sad fact is if you can't see the facts in front of you, You have no right to have a country of freedom and laws and justice.

  • AlgerHiss

    Perhaps wrong, but I believe our best bet for success in controlling our southern border is to support the elected county sheriffs: They seem less cluttered with pc nonsense and as they report directly to the people via the vote, they may do what needs done.

    I'd love to see a showdown between a sheriff and border control agents: "You either report to me, or get the Hell out of the way. This is MY county and I run the show here."

  • BS1977

    Mexico has already fallen. It's a pverty stricken, polluted mess of a country. I used to travel there regularly, but no more….Along the border region, over 20,000 people have been killed since 2003 in the seemingly endless gang wars, police and Mexican federale collusion with the gangs….it's total anarchy. Meanwhile the invasion flood of illegals continues….and our government does NOTHING to identify, arrest and deport illegal immigrants. The government has done NOTHING to stop the so called "sanctuary cities" garbage. Gov. Brewer of Arizona deserves support.

    • http://www.mysapce.com/freddawes1776/ Fred Dawes

      BS1977 Is right.

  • antifascist18

    Excuse me, but what is an ad touting Pelosi's little Princess Gabby Giffords doing in the middle of this article?

    Giffords has voted with Obama and Pelosi 90 percent of the time, she is NOT tough on border security, only going so far as her Democratic Party masters allow her to. She opposed SB1070 – and would do virtually nothing to prevent these cartels, gangs and Illegals from coming to Arizona. Fixed border stations with only 1200 men manning them? Please, (and I admire the Border Patrol agents I've seen outside of Tombstone) that is the Keystone cops aka Obama-Holder-Calderon and yes, Giffords approach to border security.

    Want real border security south of Tucson? – Fine, elect a Marine, Jesse Kelly on Nov. 2nd, NOT a Democratic Party Princess.

    And David, kindly remove this pretending something I'm not video…

  • http://www.mysapce.com/freddawes1776/ Fred Dawes

    before long the drug dealers of mexico will attack the USA And take over some little city and that will start a war with mexico city but not a war like any have known but a war that will look like something out of madmax. if you think that is mut's just look at LA.

  • http://www.therepublicrevealed.com/ Victor Laslow

    Unfortunately Mexico is too far gone most Police Dept’s. in every state are taking bribes and the honest cops have no choice but to submit or face the murder of themselves or even their families. From among the honest people I know in Mexico (and there are many) who fear retribution there is an honest incorruptible squad of Federalis who still fight they are known as the untouchables (No joke) But they are to few and far between. Maybe if Obama would pull his head out of his @ss and secure our borders we could lessen the demand of the drugs and human smuggling into the US That and some covert help to the few untouchables might be a start.
    Victor Laslow
    The Republic Revealed
    2010 The year we take back Washington
    2012 The year we take back our country

    • mayday521

      2011 The Year The LORD takes it all back!!

  • Seek

    As long as fertility rates in Mexico are high and a culture of fatalism reigns, little can change. These are Aztec-descended people, and Aztecs, unlike Europeans, have their own ways.

  • Wesley69

    Mexico has had these periods before in its turbulent history, witness Pancho Villa, Emiliano Zapata and the many dictatorial leaders that country has endured. The problem now, as it was in Colombia, is the nacro-terrorism which threatens the very stability of the Mexican government. The problems Mexico experiences, due to extensive smuggling networks comes into US cities and towns. Drug gangs feed their poison to our children. So the problem is here as well.

    Many say we should seal the border with a fence and sophisticated equipment to secure it, which makes sense from a purely defensive posture against terrorism. The use of troops or a drastic increase in the border patrol may be another answer. These actions do little for the Mexicans.

    There is a solution for both Mexico and the United States which would benefit each of them, if they have to political courage to go there — the legalization of drugs. Legalization takes away the money source of the cartels and gangs. Legalization would end the murders, the kidnappings and the corruption on both sides of the border. However, should the US do this, it must be in return for Mexican enforcement of their border with US to prevent illegal immigration here. Legal work visa programs could be expanded to help Mexicans make money in the US, but that is another story. , I would legalize drugs only if Mexico enforced its laws and did not support illegal immigration. Both Mexico and the US could then tax these drug sales and could regulate it.

    All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent.
    Thomas Jefferson

  • Ghostwriter

    Wesley69,legalization of drugs will not help us. It will make drugs that much easier to get and cause more social problems. Neither Mexico or the U.S. should legalize drugs. It's a bad idea that shouldn't be tried anywhere.

    • Wesley69

      Drugs would be legalized, regulated and taxed by the government. Money could be used for treatment. Believe me, students in high school had access to all sorts of drugs. They are here. Gangs, part of the delivery system, fight over drug turf but on a smaller scale. As money is made by the gangs, they become better armed than the police. Legalize it and you can take the criminal element out of it. Legalize it and you take the power away from the drug cartels.

      • person of the book

        Do you mean hard drugs?
        Soft drugs here in Holland are tolerated, but we still have gangs.

  • Harold Vick

    Talk is cheap; action is effective but costly. We should bring our troops home from South Korea and from NATO,- sixty years is long enough- , and, in conjunction with the Mexican government, clean house south of the border.
    Anyone growing, using or selling drugs or taking up arms or munitions against the joint Mexican- US forces should be given a one way trip out to sea.

  • Barbaracvm

    Start by taking back the national park in AZ. Send in US military in full battle gear. Build the fence, cement, barb wire; make it real. Blast the tunnels shut! Have Sheriff Arpaio sp? supervise the tent prisons where the illegals are imprisoned. They can eat baloney sandwiches, drink water and wear pink, just like all of the other prisoners.
    Any one caught shooting at any US citizen gets shot dead.

    I want my country back.

    • Wesley69

      I agree with you, but we can not have a nacro-state south of the border. It will more than likely be hostile to us allying itself with Venezuela and other radical regimes.

  • Wesley69

    What is driving demand for the drugs — We are. US consumers. When we outlaw anything, organized crime supplies the demand. Look at US history, Chicago, Al Capone. The drug cartels are the ones profiting because they supply the demand.

    The cartels are smart by spending money on the peasants working for them. The peasants make more money raising coca than planting other crops. To politicians they offer a choice silver or lead. We may have been somewhat successful in Colombia, but cocaine is still traveling into Mexico from South America.

    Sure we can seal the border, but we have a long coastline. We don't have enough Coast Guard ships to patrol all of our coasts. We can build more ships, enlist more sailors. We can hire more border patrol. We can increase inspects, monitor large cash deposits — BUT all of this is going to cost money. The border is a priority but HOW MUCH to we spend.

    As I said previously, you legalize drugs, you take away the profits of the cartel, the gangs within this country. Without large sums of cash, they can't purchase the weapons they use against police and soldiers. Mexico could regain control of its country. We would treat drug addiction like alcoholism. We would regulate it and tax it. Just like alcohol, it is a vice. But, abolition of alcohol didn't work either. You can not repeal the laws of supply to satisfy a demand. Econ 101.

    • Bogdan the Aussie

      Absolutely agree Wesley. The cretinism of drug prohibition can no longer be tolerated. Until the responsibililty for that monstrous social pathology won't be shifted from the third party (drug producers and pushers) onto the real perpetrator (drug abuser) the entire talk (there is already hundred years talk taking place) about fighting that illnes is devoid of any sense.
      Like in the case of an alcohol the only guilty here is the idiot taking drugs of his or her own FREE will.
      The only effective measures are to precisely define and determinetly execute the INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITY of every INDIVIDUAL.
      It is undisputable fact that the main enabler in Mexico's tragedy (regardless of civilisational backwardness of her citizens) is the United States Of America as it is the only party that finances the norcotic industry and then is forced to administer and pay for the entire social pathology related to drugs but caused by the individual irresponsibility of her cretiniesed citizens.
      The same rule is apt to my own Eunuchalia of course.

  • tim

    The problem is twofold: first, the ruling oligarchy in Mexico does not recognize that all the rest of the population is composed of small entrepeneurs who given half a chance, would rid themselves of poverty AND the War On Drugs just won't work. Legalize and control them and put the gangsters out of business. It worked Post-Prohibition !

  • Triple_AAA

    Mexico poses a greater challenge to the United States than even Iran. We need to categorize this into three separate areas, the problem, cause, and the solution. First the problem, I totally agree that Mexico is a failed state. Here's why, the US spends 4.7 % of its GDP on defense, Mexico on the other hand, spends a mere 0.5% . For a country going through a civil war of sorts, where there is virtual anarchy on the streets, thats just shameful. Even if the federal government in Mexico wants to act against the cartels they simply don't have the resources to do so. The Mexican military is outmanned and often outgunned, the estimated number of cartel members are considered to be in the hundreds of thousands whereas the number of soldiers tasked to fight them a measly 50,000. These soldiers are facing an enemy employing IEDs, high powered sniper rifles, grenades, AK-47s, and RPGs. They are being attacked on a daily basis, and they are losing a good share of battles, and this is happening just a couple of miles from Brownsville, TX! There have been 27,000 Mexicans reportedly killed in this war since 2006, it's likely above 50,000 since many Mexican families refuse to report the deaths of their loved ones for fear of reciprocity. This coupled with the fact that the Mexican media has virtually surrendered to the cartels and refuse to report what's going on. President Felipe Calderon's government has chosen a law enforcement strategy to fight this war, they have recently made some high profile arrests. However, the decentralized nature of the enemy means that for every cartel leader they manage to capture, two will emerge as a result. This in addition to the disturbingly strong possibility that the cartels seem to be woven into the very fabric of Mexican culture, what may really be needed here isn't the asymmetric warfare used to pacify Iraq, but total warfare. Next the cause…

  • Triple_AAA

    Mexico is a country with a brutal and barbaric past, a past which includes a civilization so bloodthirsty in its violence that nothing today rivals it, not even Muslim Civilization! The Aztecs were arguably the most violent people to ever walk the face of the earth. The Spaniards who had just rid the Iberian Peninsula of the last remaining Muslims and who were exposed to their fair share of violence and brutality were absolutely appalled and shocked by the degree and level of violence they discovered in this New World. The violence of the Aztecs cannot be merely blamed on their leaders such as the likes of Moctezuma, it's part of the very nature of their tribe. A sort of blind faith and casual acceptance that human sacrifice, even of innocent children, was a normal part of everyday life is what connects modern Mexico with the ancients. I cannot imagine a scenario where this could play out in the US, even if there were complete anarchy. There could be several reasons why Mexico has not been able to change with time, it could be that the Spaniards did not indoctrinate Mexico enough, perhaps the Roman Catholic Church was too soft? Perhaps all of Mexico should have been annexed by the US at some point in the past? I believe this could be the solution…

    • Seek

      Why would we want to annex these savages anyway? Then, we would have to contain them. Israel's annexation of savage (i.e., Arab Muslim)-held territory, as we know, has been more trouble than it's worth for the Israelis.

      There is no substitute for strong borders and a strong interior.

      • Triple_AAA

        Even with their violent past, I think that Mexicans (who are still Christians) can be better assimilated than Muslims. I also believe that a war with Mexico is winnable unlike Afghanistan which would be impossible to win without using nukes. Plus Mexico has many resources which would be an enormous benefit to our economy. And on a side note, adding Mexico would strengthen our border security, from 2000 miles of coverage to 600 miles.

  • http://www.mysapce.com/freddawes1776/ Fred Dawes

    Triple_AAA Is totally right, if white and black Americans can not understand what would happen if guys from mexico and the third world take power inside government as it did in mexico we all are doomed to live in something that looks just like mexico.

  • Hart

    A relevant and enlightening conversation here. Thank you AAA and others.
    What about the consumer end here in the decadent US? Perhaps a great awakening and revival of Christianity [as has happened cyclically in the 1740's and the 1800's] would lessen the power of the cartels by reducing the demand. Since the late 60's, drugs have become an acceptable part of our society and that is the root of the problem.

    It is similar to our dependence on gas-powered engines resulting in huge wealth and power for the Saudis and other Wahabist states who control oil – when we can reduce our consumption, they will return to being a band of Bedouin sheikhs with little to offer the west…their power to destabilize will be diminished.

    In addition to the solutions discussed here, the US and Europe need to morally reform to the point where narcotics, cocaine and marijuana are once again considered socially unacceptable. These things occur in cultural cycles – it could happen.
    But as long as there is demand, the Aztec warlords will be rolling in cash…

    • 71_911E

      Agree with your first and last paragraphs, but the middle one is off the mark.

      You think gas-powered engines are our problem. What would you use instead? Bicycles? How about transporting goods without diesel-powered locomotives? What about using fuel oil to heat homes up North? How about the plastic used to make the keyboard you're typing on? Or the food you eat (fertilizers use petroleum products)? Rubber? The list is almost endless. The key to a thriving, civilized country is the availability of cheap energy. Wind and solar don't meet the criteria (read some of Trzupek's articles for insight).

      No, to lessen the Saudi's power, we could make all of the energy that's readily available within our own borders available without huge governmental costs (taxes and regulation), or prohibitions.

    • http://www.mysapce.com/freddawes1776/ Fred Dawes

      You are right but it will never happen, the system will not allow it, from the top we all see what it is in fact the warlords are at the top of the evil little pile of BS

  • Barbaracvm

    It does help that the cartel's can buy police and politician protection. Granted the fear they subject into the people is real.
    When armed Mexican military cross the boarder they are bringing their life style into the US.
    Where are we supposed to stop them. We US citizens want it stopped at the boarder. Yet when we put effort into a fence the Mexican government threatens Arizona with a law suit for enforcing US laws. How dare you!
    Yes we have US government officials pandering to Mexico because many of our elected officials are receiving payment of some type.
    Still we have the right to protect our selves from being murder (Arizona Rancher), stopping the drug flow is a must.

  • http://www.mysapce.com/freddawes1776/ Fred Dawes

    1 Mexico city setup the cartels in the 1970's not 1960's
    2 the weapons come from china not the USA Most gang weapons a made in china called ak-47 and bullpaps or ak-63 chinese made
    3 if any country on earth could be called failed it would be the monkey nation of mexico with it white boys at the top and its little indo running all over the place murdering and raping each other.
    4 for over 60 years our fools in our low life government have been handing out billions each years to the white monkey in power inside that joke of a country called mexico and it totally failed people.
    5 "the assland people" ( see la raza meaning the race ) here who want all good americans dead,dead,dead started this war, the government of mexico has always be part of the RED Movment and is noe controlled by the muslim Fatwa boys who happened to be asked into mexico 20 years ago in fact on 9-11 mexico city and well over 10 million people of that monkey city had a big party.

    and see it with latin america you are not white/ european and not from Rome you are indo. and totally a warlored and aztec fool, and you are likely white.

  • Bob Fox

    Predictions:

    1. We will have our American Special Forces eventually cross the border to target and eradicate the cartels.

    If that does not work then:

    2. We will take over the states of Mexico and expand our country which will solve many problems including the eradication of all of the cartels.

    3. Then we will build a REAL triple layer fence on our new American southern border !

    Life is full of choices… all choices have consequences.

  • http://crosscatholicblog.com Ingrid Wallinga

    Hey there, long time reader and lurker here with my first comment! My daughter is getting married to her lovely mexican gentleman soon, and I’m tasked with preparing the wedding party! I thought enchiladas would be a nice snack, so trying to find some good enchilada recipes. What do you think? Any other suggestions?? Anyway, thanks for your hard work as ever… I’ll try to comment a little more on future posts.

  • Eric

    What a great read, I'm really glad that I stumbled upon this.
    Indianapolis chiropractor

  • http://rile90wolk.onsugar.com/ Office Design

    The failure of the Mexican state is not just speculation. In December 2008 the United States Joint Forces Command issued a strategic evaluation of threats facing the United States. The report warned, in a worst case scenario, of the rapid and sudden collapse of two major states, Pakistan and Mexico. Former drug czar General Barry McCaffry has also commented on the seriousness of the situation, saying that the Mexican state is fighting for its survival, and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton recently described the violence in Mexico as an insurgency.

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  • http://www.petsyy.com/2012/02/29/7/ pet insurance

    The highly educated, upper-income, modern city of Monterrey, MX is under command. The city is full of smart, educated young people that are trying to modernize and move into the future.

    Lets hope they do move forward

  • http://www.philkrnjeu.com/ Lindsay Martin

    Network Marketing is a funny industry that's simultaneously full of almost religious network marketing training dogma, but at the same time – it's got some of the most brilliant marketing tactics in the entire world of business. When you're first getting started out in this industry, you could luck out and have a sponsor that knows how to train you in modern day tactics, or you could be sponsored by someone that has never created any kind of real wealth in their entire life.

    Many people who begin a network marketing business forget the importance of the word 'network'. The path to success in this business model is to build a sales organisation and you receive commissions for referring people to the business opportunity. There are different terms for this role but the one that is widely understood is Sponsor. You are sponsoring people into the business opportunity.

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    There are many things to take into consideration when trying to find out what is the best network marketing company. While some people may consider their company the best because they have a great pay plan, others might consider theirs the best because their company made the most money last year. Some people might say they have the best MLM company because they have the tastiest products, while others will say that their company is the best, simple because they were told to say that and they are really looking for a mlm business opportunities

    lastly The best network marketing company for you is one that has several characteristics. Having said that not all companies in the network marketing industry can be the best. That doesn't mean the rest are bad. It just means that to be the best for you a network marketing company must have the 4 elements Which I reveal to you.

  • http://www.philkrnjeu.com/ Lindsay Martin

    Network Marketing is a funny industry that's simultaneously full of almost religious network marketing training dogma, but at the same time – it's got some of the most brilliant marketing tactics in the entire world of business. When you're first getting started out in this industry, you could luck out and have a sponsor that knows how to train you in modern day tactics, or you could be sponsored by someone that has never created any kind of real wealth in their entire life.

    Many people who begin a network marketing business forget the importance of the word 'network'. The path to success in this business model is to build a sales organisation and you receive commissions for referring people to the business opportunity. There are different terms for this role but the one that is widely understood is Sponsor. You are sponsoring people into the business opportunity.

    Most network marketers quit, except for the leaders, who start looking for additional training and education. Hungry for success, members of the latter group end up easy prey for the current network marketing training scams.

    Unfortunately, most MLM companies' network marketing training programs consist of barely motivational meetings on conference calls. Most mlm companies fail to teach their distributors the basics of marketing and communications skills. This is considered one of the major reasons for the high rate of failure in multi-level marketing programs.

    There are many things to take into consideration when trying to find out what is the best network marketing company. While some people may consider their company the best because they have a great pay plan, others might consider theirs the best because their company made the most money last year. Some people might say they have the best MLM company because they have the tastiest products, while others will say that their company is the best, simple because they were told to say that and they are really looking for a mlm business opportunities

    lastly The best network marketing company for you is one that has several characteristics. Having said that not all companies in the network marketing industry can be the best. That doesn't mean the rest are bad. It just means that to be the best for you a network marketing company must have the 4 elements Which I reveal to you.

  • Person

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  • Tom Webb

    Here is my idea on bringing justice and order to Mexico:

    I propose this… since Mexico has proven time and time again that they are corrupt and unwilling to help their people living on the border, or anywhere for that matter, I mean REAL HELP, not sending in a few military units reactively every time violence makes the news.

    Mexico should turn over all the land at the border plus 50 miles into Mexico to the USA on a temporary basis for the next 20-30 years. We dont want to keep the land, but we cant help clean it up if we don’t own it. We will send in our military, kill every narco all the way to the top, bring in our own police force and work and train a rock solid, non-corruptable Mexican police force that will be the model for the rest of the Mexican police force. We would also invest heavily in infrastructure and make it a nice, safe place to live for Mexicans and Americans. In that 20-30 years we will come up with a comprehensive plan to make sure we never live like this again, and that our biggest illegal immigration problem is a Canadian overstaying their tourist visa.