It Is OK to Burn Our Flag But Not To Honor It.


Let me get this straight.  According to the Supreme Court, burning the American flag is protected speech under the First Amendment.  Yet in order to protect the sensibilities of Mexican-American students celebrating the Mexican holiday of Cinco de Mayo, a California Bay area school decided that high school students would not be permitted to wear  t-shirts emblazoned with the American flag.

The Mexican-American students were allowed to display the Mexican flag as well as dress in the colors of the Mexican flag, but those naughty kids wearing American flag t-shirts were sent home on Cinco de Mayo after an administrator at the high school complained that the American flag t-shirt was “incendiary.”

Here is what one of the aggrieved Mexican-American students had to say about those “incendiary” trouble-makers daring to display the stars and stripes in a U.S. public school:

I think they should apologize cause it is a Mexican Heritage Day. We don’t deserve to be get disrespected like that. We wouldn’t do that on Fourth of July.

Isn’t that nice of them?

Even Bill O’Reilly – in his mission to prove how fair and balanced he is – said last night on “The Factor” that the school administrator was correct in order to prevent a fight from breaking out.  Speaking with Fox News anchor and legal expert Megyn Kelly who understood the First Amendment implications, which seemed to elude O’Reilly, he had the following exchange:

Okay, so the five students show up and they wear these American flag logos on bandanna or the shirt. And they immediately pulled into the principal’s office, because they’re afraid. Rightly so. The principal’s rightly afraid that on Cinco de Mayo, this could cause some problem, correct?

MEGYN KELLY: All except for the rightly part. Yes, they got pulled into the vice principal’s office. It was the vice principal who really had a problem with it. His name is Miguel Rodriguez. And he thought that this was going to cause some sort of a disturbance and claimed that some students had complained.

O’REILLY: Okay, but when you say I’m wrong when I say rightly, if I were the vice principal, Miguel Rodriguez, I would have pulled them in, too, because–

KELLY: Because they wore American flags?

O’REILLY: No, no, not at all. Not because of what they were wearing, but because there could have been a fight. Don’t you understand that there could have been a fight because this issue with the Arizona and everything else.

KELLY: The theoretical notion that there could be a fight is not enough.

O’REILLY: You’ve got to be proactive. You’ve got to be proactive as an educator

KELLY: No, you don’t. Well, you’ve got to be proactive in trampling all over the constitution then, because that’s not allowed.

O’REILLY: Okay, so you’re coming at it from a legal point of view?

So what is O’Reilly saying here?  That the Constitution does not matter when politically incorrect displays of our flag might trigger a violent reaction?  It’s probably a good thing for the kids that O’Reilly is no longer a teacher.

For icing on the cake, here is what President Obama said during a reception to honor Cinco de Mayo:

We gather to mark a day that’s become as celebrated here in the United States as it is in Mexico…the glory of this day is shared by both of our countries…So today reminds us that America’s diversity is America’s strength. That’s why I spoke out against the recently passed law in Arizona.

I am not worried nearly so much about the Arizona police enforcing the law against illegal immigrants, as I am about the diversity police who enforce political correctness.  Oh, and I also worry about a president who cares more about the rights of illegal immigrants than the safety of American citizens and who believes that a Mexican holiday is also a U.S. holiday.