More people died in Ira Einhorn’s apartment than at Three Mile Island


Ira Einhorn, master of ceremonies at the first Earth Day rally (April 22, 1970)

Earth Day is now just over a week away. As schools, the media and all levels of government prepare to lay on yet another layer of misinformation manure, be sure to have your facts at the ready. (And not just the one about how April 22 just happens to be Lenin’s birthday…)

This week, George Will points out that whereas hundreds of coal miners have died doing a dangerous but necessary job, “the number of Americans killed by accidents in 55 years of generating electricity by nuclear power is: 0.”

Will then raises his lance and tilts at windmills — which, unlike Quixote’s whimsical targets, are neither fictional nor entirely innocuous:

Wind power involves gargantuan “energy sprawl.” To produce 20 percent of America’s power by wind, which the Obama administration dreamily proposes, would require 186,000 tall turbines—40 stories tall, their flashing lights can be seen for 20 miles—covering an area the size of West Virginia. The amount of electricity that would be produced by wind turbines extending the entire 2,178 miles of the Appalachian Trail can be produced by four reactors occupying four square miles of land.

And blogger Kate McMillan helpfully points out that windmills have even been known to pull reverse Quixotes, and impale people. Ooops!

Not that Gaia worshiping misanthropes care about such fatalities. Like their hero Lenin, they figure if you wanna to make a tofu omelette, you gotta break some soybeans. It’s an attitude traceable to no less than the master of ceremonies at the first ever Earth Day extravaganza back in 1970.

You see, Ira Einhorn took the whole “recycling” thing a little too far when he “composted” his girlfriend’s remains in a trunk in his closet. Double ooops!

Another (Earth) Day, another “progressive” outlaw hero.