Labour Pains Deliver Coalition Government to UK


Conservative PM Cameron and Lib Dem Deputy PM Nick Clegg

UK PM Gordon Brown announced his resignation, recommending Queen Elizabeth appoint 43 year-old Conservative Party leader David Cameron as Prime Minister, who, prior to Brown’s announcement, told the BBC:

“It’s now decision time for the Liberal Democrats and I hope they will make the right decision to give this country the strong, stable government that it badly needs and badly needs quickly.”

The decision to move from Labour government to Conservative, appointing David Cameron to Prime Minister, took only one hour.  Cameron took office immediately without any interim period.

Cameron’s appointment included a deal with Lib Dem Nick Clegg, now Deputy Prime Minister, for a new UK government.  This leaves questions as to what these changes mean for British governmentCameron responded, telling the press:

“I aim to form a proper and full coalition between the Conservatives and the Liberal Democrats.”   

Deputy Prime Minister Clegg spoke to unsure Lib Dems, stating:

“I want to assure you that I wouldn’t have entered into this agreement unless I was genuinely convinced that it offers a unique opportunity to deliver the kind of changes you and I believe in.”

Brown’s resignation comes on the heels of failed attempts to secure deals with the opposition.  But will the new coalition make the UK stable?

On Thursday May 6, 2010, the Labour Government, along with other parties, lost the general election, failing to secure a coalition deal with the Liberal Democrat Party.  The Conservative Party received the majority of parliament seats.  A new government coalition now rests in the hands of the Tories and Lib Dems.

Cameron/Clegg Government: Is this Conservative or Liberal?

The new coalition government is made of two separate parties, each with their own manifestos.  This is not the Thatcher government that eliminated welfare for life and ushered in privatization of business.  Welfare will continue as will Tony Blair socialism, except two parties now work as one rather than duking it out on separate, competitive ideas that either creates strength or weakness.

Suggestions for government changes concern both sides.  The Tories say they intend to cut government spending by £6bn before 2011, Lib Dems want income taxes increased by £10,000, while not raising the inheritance tax.  Sky News reports Lib Dems say cutting government spending won’t help lower the deficit.  Conservatives say they will not raise employee National Insurance, Libs Dems want all earning less £10,000 exempt from paying income tax, but do not support tax breaks for married couples.  Conservatives want immigration into the UK capped and welfare and education reformed.

Will a coalition of opposite governments create a center-left or center-right parliament?  And who will win out in deciding the voting system?

Many MP’s and voters worry the UK voting system will change from First-Past-The-Post system (winner take all—Under the current system, MPs must receive 50% of the votes in their constituency or face elimination form the race) desired by Conservatives, to the Alternative Vote system of Proportional Representation (elected seats in proportion to votes), wanted by Lib Dems.  Cameron says he does not favor moving to proportional representation. According to the BBC:

“There will be a referendum on scrapping Britain’s first-past-the-post voting system in favour of the Alternative Vote method before the next general election.”  Labour says they will let voters decide whether or not the UK should have a new voting system.

The next question: what kind of DVD’s will Obama give this UK PM?  I don’t see much hope in retrieving Winston Churchill’s bust Obama hurled back at Gordon Brown.