Radical Libertarians Slam the Tea Party as Too Christian


Radical Libertarians claim the Tea Party is too Christian, insisting the party abandoned its core principles of small central government, fiscal conservativism, and upholding the Constitution’s amendments by becoming too Christian when the movement is really supposed to be libertarian.

Says who?  The Tea Party consists of the American people no matter their party or religion.

Anger toward the Tea Party is directed at Christian conservatives like Sarah Palin: unlike libertarians, who support gay marriage, abortion, and legalizing drugs and prostitution, Palin does not.  Many libertarians say because Palin is not liberal on social issues they are fed up with the Tea Party, calling it a right-wing NeoCon Republican propaganda machine that lost its libertarian values.

The progressive side of the Tea Party claims the conservative right, called neo-con fascists by libertarians, is no longer speaking up against big government spending and excessive taxes.  The Tea Party is no longer a place to voice social liberal views.  According to the latest column at Lew Rockwell.com: Christians are destroying the Tea Party with religious beliefs in God and the Bible:

MyType.com data says devoutly religious conservatives comprise 22.5% of the Tea Party and are its fastest growing segment.  They bring with them a fundamentally different set of values, morals and personalities than libertarian supporters, a core group that represent 17% of the party.  While the former tend to be morally charged, family-oriented traditionalists, many libertarian supporters are neither religious nor traditional—rather; they are independent, intellectual, and morally permissive.  The rising prominence of religious conservatives within the movement, highlighted by recent religious right rhetoric from several prominent figures affiliated with the Tea Party, appears to be driving away libertarians and others.

I thought libertarians believed America should never trample anyone’s rights.

The Tea Party never said Americans must believe in God. Christian conservatives, like libertarians, want freedom to exercise rights without government interference.

Dr. David P. Gushee says:

libertarianism is not an intrinsically Christian worldview and that Christian embrace of it makes for an uneasy marriage.  My friendly [libertarian] ‘Tea Party’ correspondents beg to differ, but any review of the great traditions of Christian social and political thought bears out my claim… [Christians] understand that we were made by our Creator not just to claim rights for ourselves but to serve one another, and that a society governed by raw libertarian individualism cannot be the best we can do.  Today’s libertarian resurgence is at best an uneasy fit with Christian principles.

MyType says:

It’s plausible that the rising prominence of religious conservatives in the Tea Party is driving libertarians away from the group.  Though the two groups are demographically fairly similar, psychographically they are fundamentally different people…

Karl Denninger, the guy who asked Americans to mail tea bags to Washington leaders, stated in his recent LewRockwell.com column, “To the Tea Party, Go Screw Yourself!,” Tea Party conservatives are infringing on gay rights with conservative Christian beliefs he says are opposite of the libertarian liberal view:

What part of ‘what you do in your bedroom is none of my damn business’ didn’t you [conservative Christians and Sarah Palin] bother with?  You can find that in the 4th Amendment as well as elsewhere.  In terms of public space what is your private sexual preference and life doing in the public space in the first place?  200 years ago we called such people perverts and stuck them in the stocks.  You want to address this problem?  It’s simple: That’s a gay (or straight) person’s private life and its none of anyone else’s damn business what two or more consenting adults do behind a closed door on private property.

So much for First Amendment rights libertarians allegedly claim to support.

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • RSS
  • StumbleUpon
  • Reddit
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Mixx
  • Google Bookmarks
  • LinkedIn
  • Blogplay
  • Ping.fm
  • Technorati
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Sphinn
  • PDF