A Murder in China and the Global War Against the Unborn


The murder of Xiao Aiying’s baby in southwest China this past week is just one of millions since the Communist country instituted its one-child policy in 1979.  Xiao, wife and mother, committed the unspeakable crime of wanting a second child. At eight months pregnant, she almost got away with it.

Aiying’s husband gave this account of the killing to reporters. From UK’s dailymail:

Twelve government officials entered [Xiao Aiying’s] house where they hit and kicked her in the stomach, before taking her kicking and screaming to hospital.

They held her hands behind her back and pushed her head against the wall and kicked her in the stomach,  I don’t know if they were trying to give her a miscarriage.

Our ten-year-old daughter has been excited about having a little brother or sister but I don’t know how I can explain to her what has happened.

There [at the hospital] the 36-year-old was restrained as doctors injected her with a drug to kill the unborn baby.
The women in China like Xiao have been on the progressives’ hit list for a very long time. Margaret Sanger wrote an article that was  published in the China Times on April 30, 1922 entitled “Will China Accept the Principles of Birth Control?” Almost one hundred years ago, a petite, socialist woman  from New York had her eye on the Far East:

I believe China will accept Birth Control, not perhaps at one swallow, but rapidly in the next few years. Already there has been great interest in the question, especially among the younger generation. It is in that generation China’s destiny is to change and it will change, perhaps dramatically. And Birth Control must [precede] any great permanent change in her social systems, for birth control is first & foremost a principle of freedom and social right, and next a great very great indeed economic expedient.

57 years after Sanger’s prediction  China incorporated its one-child policy into the Constitution. Officials report that it has prevented 400 million births since then and created an economic boon. The head of the National Planning and Population Commission stated last month that the policy will stand despite a poll that showed 70% of Chinese women would like to have more than two children. Sanger’s contention that birth control would become a “very great indeed economic expedient” echoes the present day  Chinese government who state that the policy has raised the standard of living for those already born.

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