As His Group Faces Financial Collapse, Race-Baiting, Tax-Cheating Serial Liar Al Sharpton Does A Show About Nothing


Racial bomb thrower and poverty pimp extraordinaire Al Sharpton came on the “Glenn Beck Program” and had a touchy-feely discussion with the host about, well, nothing.

The topic was supposed to be faith, hope, and charity, but instead Beck and Sharpton just patted themselves on the back for being so civil to each other and because they were enlightened enough to sit down and have a chat.

Whoopty do.

Beck lobbed softball after softball. He asked Sharpton, ”Would you agree that this country is as divided as it has been in a long, long time?”

Sharpton replied

I think that it is divided politically. I think there is still some institutional divide that we’ve got to challenge. But I also think that on some levels, there’s been a coming together in other areas. I think it has shifted.

It went on like that with Sharpton and Beck speaking in airy-fairy generalities. It was a weak segment to be sure and probably one of the weakest Beck has done on his show since he left CNN for FOX last year.

Meanwhile, Sharpton’s radical left-wing ACORN-wannabe pressure group is in serious financial trouble.

New York-based National Action Network Inc., owes a minimum of $1,556,059 in federal taxes and $108,489 in New York taxes, according to the Nexis tax liens database. Tax agencies typically file tax liens only after taxes have become significantly overdue and other collection methods have failed.

Rachel Noerdlinger, executive vice president of communications for the 19-year-old racial bomb-throwing group, said rumors of the group’s imminent demise were greatly exaggerated.

“NAN faced tremendous challenges in 2007 and 2008 but after reaching an agreement with state and federal tax authorities the problems have been resolved and NAN will present a very robust report where the organization is financially now and moving forward at our national convention in April,” she said.

The flamboyant, scandal-prone Sharpton, who sought the Democratic presidential nomination six years ago, is known for his taste for luxury and for his skill in ducking creditors. He once bragged to the New York Times that he didn’t own any business suits but had “access” to some. He would admit only to owning his wristwatch and wedding ring. His group ran up huge bills with a limousine service in New Jersey and had a $51,939 civil judgment entered against it in 2003.