NewsReal Blog Book Club: Calvin Freiburger’s Favorites


It’s NewsReal Sunday so perhaps it’s appropriate that for today’s NRB Book Club we feature the selections of Calvin Freiburger who lists several religiously-themed titles in addition to some political picks:

Think a Second Time by Dennis Prager—in a series of short essays, the incomparable Dennis Prager applies his trademark reason and clarity to politics, morality, religion, media, and culture.

Men in Black: How the Supreme Court is Destroying America by Mark Levin—an invaluable overview of America’s judicial history and comparison of judicial originalism vs. the Left’s “living-document” theory, as well as proposed solutions to re-inject sanity into the courts. (Speaking of sanity, Levin also includes a few brief yet surprising snapshots of actual cases of insanity on the high court throughout history.)

The Long March: How the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s Changed America by Roger Kimball—Kimball patiently and powerfully explains how the Flower Generation’s fling with moral relativism, disdain for law and order, and other trendy ideas still impacts America today.

The Party of Death: The Democrats, the Media, the Courts, and the Disregard for Human Life by Ramesh Ponnuru—National Review’s Ramesh Ponnuru prevents a compelling case for defending the sanctity of human life against abortion and embryo-destructive research, dispels common pro-choice myths and talking points, and offers pro-lifers causes for optimism.

Disinformation: 22 Media Myths That Undermine the War on Terror by Richard Miniter—is terrorism caused by poverty? Did Saddam Hussein ever have WMDs? Just what did the Bush Administration really say about Iraq’s oil? Terrorism reporter Richard Miniter presents a well-researched, matter-of-fact collection of falsehoods and rebuttals that no conservative should be without.

The West’s Last Chance: Will We Win the Clash of Civilizations? by Tony Blankley—a sobering look at the spread of militant Islam around the globe, the future of Europe, and what America can & should do about both.

Pro-Life Answers to Pro-Choice Arguments by Randy Alcorn—an absolute must-have reference for any pro-lifer, this is a comprehensive, carefully-researched, rationally-argued collection of every contentious aspect of abortion and other life-related issues.

What’s So Great about Christianity by Dinesh D’Souza—D’Souza turns the New Atheists’ favorite tool—reason—against them in this an accessible and eloquent defense of Christianity’s theological claims, rationality, and impact on human history.

What’s So Great about America by Dinesh D’Souza—an invaluable defense of the United States’ good name against the usual slander of America as being a force for racism and imperialism throughout her history.  Not only does D’Souza show that we’re much better than the Left gives us credit for, he also reveals that where we have erred, we’re far from unique among the nations of the world.

The Great Divorce by CS Lewis—Lewis’s classic is a unique, captivating tour of the afterlife, raising thought-provoking questions as to the nature of heaven and hell, and offering powerful insights pertaining to human failing, God’s love, and redemption.

Myths, Lies, and Downright Stupidity: Get Out the Shovel—Why Everything You Know Is Wrong by John Stossel—a wide array of easily-digestible explanations as to why the conventional wisdom on healthcare, education, and all sorts of other issues just isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.

How to Talk to a Liberal (If You Must): The World According to Ann Coulter—all of Ann Coulter’s books (High Crimes & Misdemeanors, Slander, Treason, Godless, If Democrats Had Any Brains They’d Be Republicans, and Guilty) are powerhouse works of argumentation that belong on every conservative’s bookshelf, but this one deserves special attention. As a compilation of Coulter columns over the years (including several director’s cuts and never-before-seen gems), How to Talk to a Liberal tackles just about every issue under the sun as only Ann can, making it the definitive collection of Coulter thought and an excellent primer on conservatism.