Marxist Preacher on the BP Oil Spill: “It’s a Religious Issue”


There are two kinds of people in this world: those who worship the Creator and those who worship the creation.

Those who worship the Creator were charged with working the land and caring for it. But alas, these words of old have been long forgotten.

The Creation worshipers began to create laws, and more laws, and still more laws, until one day a father could no longer take his son fishing on a Sunday afternoon—without a permit. A man could not hunt on his own land—without a license.

While we were sleeping a new morality and a new “Christianity” has emerged—and with the BP oil spill—they have a new crisis to implement it.

Chris Matthews, host of MSNBC’s “Hardball” made the perfect choir-boy for Rev. Jim Wallis to preach to on the morality of the oil spill.

Wallis, the leftist who dreams that more Christians “will come to view the world through Marxist eyes” is the editor of Sojourners, a left wing radical magazine, that promotes “social justice” and political activism, under the guise of  Christian ministry. Wallis, in his twisted theology, is a man who managed to remain silent on Cambodia’s Khmer Rouge genocide, but found his voice to lecture us on the immorality of BP and our wicked oil addiction.

Wallis commenting on the oil spill:

These things feel almost apocalyptic. I think it’s a sign of our oil addiction. Chris, as you know, we know that addictions make your life not work. So this oil spill is showing how our oil addiction is making our lives not work. So we have to deal with this. So for people of faith, it’s a moral issue, it’s a religious issue. It’s not just a political issue here.

Matthews:

Do you think the president has been morally correct in letting BP take the lead?

Unfortunately, Matthews slid off into one of his usual blathering rants, not allowing his guest to answer his question. This time he rattled on about “Captain Nemo” which David Forsmark covered well.

Most of us are astounded at that depth and power of the environmental laws and agencies, and their impact on private property and industry. For this, as a Christian, I feel in part responsible. There was a void—and someone else filled it with their morality.

Without question the oil spill is a disaster. But there are disasters all around us. The spill itself is not anymore immoral than a flood. Crisis will also divide people into two categories—those whose morality shines in the face of disaster, and those who see a crisis as an opportunity to seize more power.