Give “The Camp of the Saints” This Christmas


Pages: 1 2

If the dangerous clowns of Nigeria’s Boko Haram (“Books, Him Bad!”) are escapees from an unpublished novel of Evelyn Waugh, the builders of the Ground Zero Victory Mosque and their sickening enablers are creatures whose mischief is even blacker: They are living, breathing characters torn from the pages of The Camp of the Saints.

Really, only Jean Raspail could have come up with this scenario: Muslims fly a plane into the largest building in America, then finagle a way to buy a piece of the crash site for pennies on the dollar using shadowy money they cannot account for, then claim that America’s freedom of religion (which they reject on Islamic principle) must permit them to build on the site, then they have the infinite gall to apply for government money to build it–all the while a Christian church destroyed by the Muslims is being blocked by the very same city government, which is run by a Jewish liberal, who’s betraying his own people’s interests so that he can make inroads with his financial news services in the Middle East. The only way this story could be more lurid and implausible would be if NYC mayor Michael Bloomberg had made his fortune selling rope.

The Camp of the Saints, by the prize-winning French novelist Jean Raspail, has “awakened” countless Westerners to the dangers of mass, non-Western immigration since its publication in 1973. Translated into English, publicized in the pages of National Review (back when that magazine’s target market was adults) with a review by Jeffrey Hart, the novel is a bracing, sobering look at the suicidal liberalism that has infected Western elites. In the book, a mass exodus of refugees from India loads itself onto boats and announces it is sailing for the West. (Ironically, for us, the people aboard the ships in The Camp of the Saints are actually meant to be Hindus–who have proved, in fact, to be the most cooperative and productive of immigrant groups. Never mind: it’s merely a metaphor.)

Pages: 1 2

  • The Bishop

    On the recommendation of me father-in-law I read this book a little over 20 years ago. In hindsight it is amazing how prescient Raspail was. Thanks for reminding me of it. This one is worth a re-read.

  • Andres de Alamaya

    Amen.

  • Guest

    It isn't often that one gets a laugh from FrontpageMag, but this comment by author Roland Shirk tickled me no end: " . . . publicized in the pages of National Review (back when that magazine’s target market was adults)." Well done, sir.
    I have no idea who the target audience of the Lowry-Ponnurru-Goldberg axis of inanity is (other than white guiltists) but it certainly is not adults.

  • Doug

    This is one of my favorite books and one I have recommended and sent copies to friends. The author's ability to see through Western guilt and political correctness, for a book that came out in the early 70s, is astounding.

  • tommyboy52

    Very interesting book. In this book, the members of the media, as well as the liberal-left, will be all too familiar.

  • trickyblain

    Worst. Sentence. Ever. Written.

    —Really, only Jean Raspail could have come up with this scenario: Muslims fly a plane into the largest building in America, then finagle a way to buy a piece of the crash site for pennies on the dollar using shadowy money they cannot account for, then claim that America’s freedom of religion (which they reject on Islamic principle) must permit them to build on the site, then they have the infinite gall to apply for government money to build it–all the while a Christian church destroyed by the Muslims is being blocked by the very same city government, which is run by a Jewish liberal, who’s betraying his own people’s interests so that he can make inroads with his financial news services in the Middle East.—

  • flyingtiger

    I first read this book in the 70's. I stopped after 25 pages because I believed that this book was ubrealistic. No country would allow this! Now we live in a camp of the saints world. I consider this book to be non-fiction.

  • flyingtiger

    Oops, forgot to say, this book is highly recommended, and you should read it.

  • Guest

    "… the novel is a bracing, sobering look at the suicidal liberalism that has infected Western elites."

    James Burnham did this about 40-plus years ago with his book "Suicide of the West" which was an MRI of sappy liberalism and its feel-good policies of appeasement, hand-holding, folk-dancing, kumbaya-singing, street-dumb, wishful-thinking in a world of cut-throat communism.

  • Frankila

    An important information for american readers :

    In February 2011, a new edition of the novel, published by Robert Laffont (the original publisher), will be released in French. A new preface, written by the author (around forty pages), will be included with many surprises …