Male and Female Bloggers: Separate, but Equal


This is fascinating. I just read Rhonda Robinson’s piece, Do Women Bloggers Have the Prowess of Men?, and then turned my attention back to the book I’m reading for research for my new book. It’s called The Male Brain, by Louann Brizendine, M.D. Here’s a quote:

“Boys are programmed to move, make things move, watch things move. We now know that the motivation for movement is biologically wired into the male brain. A boy’s superior ability to track moving objects isn’t the result of being conditioned by his environment. It’s the result of having a male brain.”

Now wouldn’t “moving objects” fall into line with blogging? I can’t think of anything that moves faster. So I took particular interest in Margaret Wente’s analogy that blogging for men is nothing more than a “peeing contest.” I think there may be something to this. Dr. Brizendine also writes, though it’s not rocket science to those of us who are in the throes of raising boys,

“Studies show that from an early age, boys are interested in different activities than girls.”

But don’t ever say this in front of a feminist. As Robinson points out, these lefties “would have us believe there are no difference between men and women.” This has, in fact, been one of the greatest farces ever perpetuated on the modern generation (which I’ll be covering in a chapter of my new book). There are indeed huge differences between men and women — but they’re often misunderstood. It’s not that these differences mean men and women can’t achieve the same goals, it’s that, more often than not, they don’t want to. And when they do pursue the same things, they do them differently.

“The male and female brains have access to the same circuits but, without intervention, use them differently,” writes Dr. Brizendine.

So my analysis about male vs. female bloggers is this: Men don’t make better bloggers than women. But their reasons for blogging and the way they go about it are different from women’s — which I think was Rhonda’s point. That said, I do think men have a greater propensity to blog — think peeing — as not many women can withstand the kind of vitriol that’s often doled out in the blogosphere.

Suzanne Venker is an author, blogger, and former teacher. You can read more from Suzanne at www.suzannevenker.com and No Bull Mom.