Misguided Wives and Powerless Husbands


The new brouhaha about parents Joseph and Rebecca Reyes, one of whom is Catholic and the other Jewish, is a classic example of two broken institutions in America: the judicial system — and marriage.

The problem with the judicial system is simple: Judges have taken their power and run with it. As one lawyer from Rochester, NY, writes in a review of  The Supremicists: The Tyranny of Judges — and How to Stop It:

‘There is no doubt judges see their branch of government as superior in authority to the legislative and executive – combined. They do not recognize the other two branches of government as legitimate checks and balances to their own power.”

In the Reyes’ case, the dispute is over the fact that, according to the wife, Rebecca Reyes, her husband “had pledged in the marriage contract to raise Jewish children” — and now he’s gone and taken their daughter to mass without telling her first. So Ms. Reyes takes legal action and finds the support she needs in one Judge Edward R. Jordan, a Chicago family court judge. He barred Joseph Reyes, the father, from exposing the child to “any other religion other than the Jewish religion.”

This is a highly inappropriate and extremely rare court order — and it shows the extent to which our system is corrupt. If you aren’t aware of how corrupt the system has become, that’s only because the media won’t cover it. The Left doesn’t respect the Constitution, so why do they care if judges do their own thing?

But the Reyes’ story isn’t just representative of judicial tyranny; it also demonstrates the problems with modern  marriage. As Hannah Seligson points out in today’s Wall Street Journal (one of the few newspapers in America that prints the truth), modern marriage is in shambles. The title of the article says it all: “Destination: Marriage. Route: Anybody’s Guess.” Seligson highlights a poll that shows 73% of women born between 1977 and 1989 place a high priority on marriage. As one 26 year-old woman she interviewed says,

“People are desperately looking for order out there because they want to be in committed relationships. But the lack of signposts and guidance is making it very hard to get to the point where you end up in one. Books don’t give me the lay of the land. If marriage is the destination, it’s now increasingly unclear how one should put one foot in front of the other.”

Unfortunately, turning to the new bestselling book by Elizabeth Gilbert, author of Eat, Pray, Love — ironically titled Committed, is no help, as I’ve already pointed out. “Committed claims that marriage is a terrible institution for marriage,” writes Seligson. Indeed, Ms. Gilbert has done nothing for the young people of America except confuse them even more. What the modern generation really needs is a “roadmap,” says editor Adam Rich, 29.

Which is an interesting choice of words, as I’m currently working on a book tentatively titled How to be Married: A Roadmap for the 21st Century. It’s meant to provide exactly the kind of information young people are looking for — in a fresh and provocative manner.

Which is where you may come in to the picture. I am interested in interviewing anyone who’s 50 years of age or younger and has been divorced. If you’re remarried, great. If not, that’s okay too. The main requirement is that you’ve been through a divorce. So if you would be interested in being interviewed for this book, please email me at suzannevenker@yahoo.com and put “New Book” in the subject line.

Sadly, there seems to be no hope for the Reyes. Had someone told them in advance that getting the religion thing down will be critical once children come into the picture, perhaps they never would have married and gotten themselves into this mess.

Suzanne Venker is an author, blogger, and former teacher. You can read more of her work at No Bull Mom and Right Pundits.