Hanoi Jane Fonda blames Tuscon shooting on Palin, Beck


Jane Fonda has a lot of nerve, no shame and, evidently, a mutated irony gene.

Or perhaps old age is finally catching up to the faded beauty, and her memory is failing…

In the wake of the attempted assassination of Representative Gabrielle Giffords in Arizona, the actress/traitor/serial consort of powerful men immediately broadcast her thoughts on the tragedy via Twitter.

Her first tweet blamed Sarah Palin for the shooting (see screenshot here.)

Next, Fonda blasted “Glen Beck” (sic), saying he was “guilty too. Shame.” She accused both these outspoken conservatives of creating the “uncivil” atmosphere which supposedly drove a madman to kill.

Fonda’s rush-to-judgment reaction to the massacre was sadly typical of “progressives,” as we all know by now.

What makes it extra egregious is Fonda’s unique personal history.

As can be seen from her own Twitter avatar of choice, Jane Fonda (unlike Palin or Beck) has an arrest record, and is proud of it. (Fonda was detained for kicking a government official in 1970, but the charges were dropped.)

Worse, Jane Fonda’s words and actions repeatedly led directly to violence against her fellow Americans.

Photographs of Fonda pulling giddy, girlish, almost post-orgasmic faces in the company of enemy soldiers during a 1972 visit to North Vietnam are sickly familiar (see above). However, it’s important to review the details behind those famous pictures, to comprehend Fonda’s clear (unpunished) complicity in the torture of U.S. servicemen:

In July-August 1972 Fonda made her infamous trip to North Vietnam.  By this time, over 50,000 Americans had been killed in the war. While there, she posed for pictures on an anti-aircraft gun that had been used to shoot down American planes, and she volunteered to do a radio broadcast from Hanoi. She made approximately eight radio addresses, during which she told American pilots in the area:

“Use of  these bombs or condoning the use of these bombs makes one a war criminal … Examine the reasons given to justify the murder you are being paid to commit … I don’t know what your officers tell you … but [your] weapons are illegal and that’s not just rhetoric … The men who are ordering you to use these weapons are war criminals according to international law, and in the past, in Germany and Japan,  men who committed these kinds of crimes were tried and executed.

Fonda also quoted Ho Chi Minh during some of these broadcasts. She referred to President Richard Nixon as a “new-type Hitler,” and advised South Vietnamese soldiers to desert: “You are being used as cannon fodder for U.S. imperialism.”

Fonda visited American prisoners of war and reported (falsely) that they had not been tortured. Consider the account of Michael Benge, a civilian advisor captured by the NLF in 1968 and held as a POW for five years, who writes:

“When Jane Fonda was in Hanoi, I was asked by the camp communist political officer if I would be willing to meet with her. I said yes, for I would like to tell her about the real treatment we POWs were receiving, which was far different from the treatment purported by the North Vietnamese, and parroted by Jane Fonda, as ‘humane and lenient.’  Because of this, I spent three days on a rocky floor on my knees with outstretched arms with a piece of steel re-bar placed on my hands, and beaten with a bamboo cane every time my arms dipped.”

Tellingly, Jane Fonda is exquisitley oblivious to the ultimate irony:

That if Amerikkka really was the violent, vengeful nation she loathed enough to betray — through words and deeds that made her one of the most hated women in the country — Jane Fonda wouldn’t still be alive, and able to blame a horrific mass murder on two innocent citizens.