A 9-11 Homage to Political Correctness

Mark Tooley is President of the Institute on Religion and Democracy (www.theird.org) and author of Methodism and Politics in the Twentieth Century. Follow him on Twitter: @markdtooley.


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A cathedral spokesman boasted that “diversity was first and foremost” in planning the 9-11 remembrance.  “The goal was to have interfaith representation,” he explained.  “The Cathedral itself is an Episcopal church and it stands to reason that our own clergy serve as Christian representatives.”  A representative of the Southern Baptist Convention, America’s largest Protestant body with 16 million members, or 8 times the Episcopal Church’s membership, understandably disagreed.  “It’s not surprising,” said Frank Page, president of the Southern Baptist Convention Executive Committee, in an interview with Fox News. “There is a tragic intolerance toward Protestants and particularly toward evangelicals and I wish the president would refuse to speak unless it was more representative.”  From the Religious Left perspective, “diversity” only includes participants in the multiculturalist consensus of the Left, which emphatically excludes Southern Baptists and most evangelicals.   The “Call to Compassion” predictably will include a lecture from multiculturalist icon Karen Armstrong, author if such books as “The Battle for God” and “A History of God,” and whose primary worry is typically Christian “fundamentalism.”

Far more interesting than Armstrong’s likely hectoring lecture or the service of interfaith prayers will be the evening “Concert of Hope,” where President Obama will speak, and where “R&B legend” Patti LaBelle and “country superstar” Alan Jackson will perform.  LaBelle and Jackson probably represent and appeal to more Americans than any of the other unrecognizable names who will pray and preach. The other exception will be the Catholic bishop, who, unlike the Episcopal bishop is slated to speak, actually represents millions of American Christians.

“It is our hope that the Cathedral’s commemoration, especially with President Obama’s participation in it, will move us further down the path toward healing,” explained the cathedral’s dean about “A Call to Compassion.”  But how much “healing” can there be at a jamboree almost exclusively for left-wing multiculturalists?

National Cathedral’s 9-11 service of 10 years ago, featuring such robust hymns as “A Mighty Fortress is Our God,” represented and inspired a great nation in a time of crisis.  Seemingly the cathedral’s “A Time for Compassion” aims to do neither.   Fortunately, America’s innate faith and fortitude do not depend on the National Cathedral’s narrow, faux “diversity.”

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  • Curtis

    This is an interfaith service. There is one representative from each major religion. Evangelical Christianity is not a major religion, but is a subset of Christianity, and a representative of the Christian religion is present. If evangelicals want to disassociate themselves from the Christian faith, they should go ahead and do that. But if they are Christian, they are being represented at this service and should stop complaining.

    • Ed Norton

      Well stated, Curtis.

  • Asher

    I think that everyone should start praying at the service, no matter what faith you are. What is Bloomberg going to do Usher us out for Praying to our God. What harm is there in having clergy there? I am sure the Muslims will be chanting and praying if the Ground Zero Mosque is built.

  • Pathena

    Why is the National Cathedral sponsoring a "Time of Compassion" as a commemoration of the 9/11 terrorist attacks? I have no compassion whatsoever for the Islamic fanatics who committed these attacks or for other Islamic fanatics like the murderer at Fort Hood. I honor the passengers of United 93 who stopped their hijacked plane from continuing on to Washington, D.C. to do who knows what damage and have visited Shanksville, Pennsylvania where the passengers forced the plane to crash.

    • Jaladhi

      My sentiments, exactly! What is wrong with these National Cathedral morons??? They can't see the truth and light!!

  • StephenD

    Pathena is absolutely right! I hold zero compassion for those that committed these atrocities and those that celebrated them. I hold zero compassion for those "clerics" who continue to espouse a "religion" that would sanction such acts or for those that would whitewash it. I hold monumental compassion for those that lost loved ones on that fateful day and for those yet to be lost to this scourge until we begin to fight back.

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