Counterattack in the Dairy State

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Wisconsin Supreme Court incumbent justice David Prosser may have secured a sizable electoral victory against challenger JoAnne Kloppenburg with a last-minute pick-up of 7,500 votes in the Dairy State’s hotly contested supreme court race. If the results stand, the left, particularly Wisconsin Big Labor, will have been dealt a serious set-back in spite of the formidable financial infusion and base-galvanization it received from the prolonged public sector union battle that took place in the state’s capital. For the right, the results represent proof that bold conservative action will be rewarded by the electorate, and perhaps give reason to be less fearful of relentless intimidation techniques in the future.

Preliminary results put Assistant Attorney General JoAnne Kloppenburg about 200 votes ahead of incumbent David Prosser. Kloppenburg is typically described as a liberal, while Prosser is considered conservative. Prosser had won a non-partisan primary handily, defeating three candidates with fifty-five per cent of the vote. Kloppenburg got half as many votes as Prosser in the primary. In ordinary times, that kind of primary result would mean that there was virtually no chance of unseating Prosser. But, these are not ordinary times in the state of Wisconsin.

Union activists and their supporters on the left threw millions of dollars into a race that wouldn’t normally attract national attention. They turned Prosser’s seat on the high court of the Dairy State into a target, hoping that his defeat would prove how unpopular Governor Scott Walker has become with voters. The election was thus never about Prosser and Kloppenburg’s relative qualifications to exercise jurisprudence, it was rather about angry leftists punishing those who oppose them. David Prosser was the first target, but he’s unlikely to be the last.

Prosser is one of four conservative judges on the Wisconsin Supreme Court, while two of his colleagues are generally described as liberals and the final judge is more of an independent. Thus, no matter the ultimate outcome of this election, the court can be expected to remain reliably conservative on the whole. But, by pouring millions into the attempt to unseat Prosser, the left effectively turned the election into a referendum on Governor Walker and his attempts to reign in public unions and cut spending.

“If Prosser loses, it that will show that Republicans have awoken a sleeping giant in the electorate with their war on working families,” Adam Green of the Progressive Change Campaign Committee said as the election drew near. Green’s group placed tens of thousands of phone calls to Wisconsin voters in the weeks leading up to the election, urging voters to not to cast a ballot for Prosser, whom they described as a Walker ally.

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  • Chezwick_mac

    Well, we can't begrudge the bastards for understanding how important this particular election is and for engaging in their full-court press. But one thing is certain…it's the Dems and EXCLUSIVELY the Dems who are practitioners of voter fraud in America on a mass scale (ACORN in 14 states). In an election this close, one can't help but wonder about the validity of the outcome.

  • Steeloak

    Uh oh, the person in charge of vote manufacturing screwed up & got the numbers wrong. Guess there will be a cement overcoat waiting for them somewhere. I mean, with a city like Milwaukee, where 4000 more votes were counted than there were voters, it should have been a slam dunk.

  • Steve Chavez

    Every election winner will now be subject to a recall by the other side starting with the Democrats, who are obviously sore losers and just can't handle that their decades-long stranglehold on their state has come to an end by the "will of the people." When they were in control, they never "reached across the isle" and they didn't care to and now suddenly they call for "bi-partisanship" and blame Republicans for not allowing them "into the process?" Will every State legislature that switched hands to the Republicans in November now be subject to intimidation tactics and blackmail including their Democrats who will run and hide in another State on every legislative issue that they don't agree with? (Does this remind you of a child at the checkout counter screaming that they didn't get a toy? Some parents give in and so the child realizes that if they throw a fit, they do it again and again and the parents buy them a toy every visit to the store! Good parents stand up and the child realizes that they're throwing a fit for nothing!)

    So if any Democrat turnover of an election, through a recall, succeeds, will the Republicans do the same just as revenge or will they say "Oh well, the people have spoken?" If I were in a state that did this, I would automatically vote AGAINST the Party organizing the recall as a protest vote! Hopefully the people of the States that are now dealing with this, will do the same! If not, they will deal with the Democrats throwing fits after every election that doesn't go their way! The people should however, also make accountable those Democrat legislators that ran away from "the Democratic process!"

  • jacob

    If Justice PROSSER stays, the next step is to recall the "flying" state senators

    It is time already for the people to show the politicians who is boss and time
    already pasee to rein in the rotten and corrupt unions,,,

    Why in the hell must I belong to a union if I want to work or else ????
    The days of the slave driver boss are long ago over and the rotten unions are
    precisely those who buried everything in this country, from the merchant marine
    to the auto industry and now that they see the hadwritting on the wall, they are
    trying everything in their power to keep the "statu quo"…

    It is up to the people to wake up and make them go to hell, together with the
    DEMOCRAPS….
    The news forget to remind people that this govmt. stoppage is due to lack of
    leadership from the President of the mermaid song of the "CHANGE" .because
    HE WAS BUSSY TRAVELING ALL OVER CREATION AND TRYING TO
    DETHRONE TIGER WOODS

  • zsqpwxxeh

    Cheeseheads, no.
    Iron Brigade, si.
    Arriba Wisconsin!

  • tanstaafl

    I am reminded of a story from Chicago.

    A group of Democratic election workers were recording names in cemetery. One worker found a tombstone so old it had faded in time. He went to skip over it when the ward boss caught him and said, "Go back and get that name. That corpse has as much a right to vote as anyone else in this cemetery."

    • Steve Chavez

      Someone registered my 12 year old son as a Democrat just in time for the 2008 election and he got three calls, which I recorded and pretended I was him, asking if he needed a ride or knew where to vote. On the third call, the day of the election, I informed the worker of what was happening and he seemed shocked and said he would inform his campaign boss. OVER RIGHT? In September 2010, the calls started again but this time I informed a State Election official from the NM Secretary of State at our local State Fair. He took my number and I never got a call. My son, or I, got five calls total including one around an hour before the polls closed. In both cases, I called the FBI. No return call. Finally in March 2011, I called the Secretary of State's office and our local office and they took my info. They seemed surprised. No return call or update.

      So, when my son gets old enough to vote for the first time, I'll just say, "But son, you've been voting for years!"

      In Northern New Mexico, which always vote Democrat as you can see on any Red or Blue map, the word is that the dead have been voting for decades!

  • pyeatte

    The dems and unions act like mental defectives or Stalinists (take your pick). A world ruled by them would be a living hell. Perhaps they should form another party and call themselves the Termite Party.

  • Supreme_Galooty

    Jim, I agree with you about the unions. I would draw a distinction, however, for ease of argument, to streamline the push-back against organized labour, and to draw many more people to our side of things. I would refrain from attacking "labour unions" as such. (Teamsters, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, United Auto Workers, etc.)

    I would concentrate instead on abolishing outright any government employee unions – ESPECIALLY teachers' unions. Cogent arguments can be made for that position that would attract intellectually honest union members.

    • John42

      Out of curiosity would you mind expanding on that? As a pro labor rights person who values intelligent arguments, hate and empty rhetoric are a non starter for me.

      • Supreme_Galooty

        John, I'm not dodging you here, but I'm going to be out of town until Wednesday and am currently harried. Off the top of my head, as I gallop off to the airport, I see a structural problem with public employee unions negotiating against the taxpayers when the taxpayers are represented by mere politicians, many of whom are avidly pro union. The politicians gain. The unions gain. The taxpayer suffers increasingly, as is becoming painfully evident today. This is a complex issue however, and I just don't have the time (or the allowable space in this forum) to go into it properly.

        By the way, I am – as a libertarian Americanist – just as pro-labour as I am pro-business. I prefer it when both labour and management are happy and unions are rendered superfluous – NOT an uncommon occurance.

        • John42

          Supreme_Galooty, thanks for your response, I understand this is not the best forum for this type of discussion which is quite complex. Here are some quick thoughts. I grew up in a family of small business owners, the family pharmacy which has been passed down in my family for generations. I find this type of situation ideal, although a dying business model for America. My argument for collective bargaining, is that it encompasses many different issues aside from pay, and that the people who are actually doing the job everyday, know best how to improve it. For example, pilots know that they should not work over a certain hours before they become too tired. Yet they will not get this concession through common sense for safety measures – they have to fight for the right to make our flight safer. Nurses have also fought for how many patients they are required to see. Hospitals have often pushed more and more patients on nurses as the quality of care continues to erode to save costs. The patient and the nurse has no say. Most people end up joining a union as a last resort, because they care about making their workplace better, for them, and for those they serve – and they are not able to achieve this any other way. Things that might be included in a collective bargaining agreement: opportunity for training, a limit on the number of students in a classroom, the need to have a process to address sexual harassment (to avoid lawsuits), wages, hours, benefits.

          How is pay set in the first place? This is indeed a negotiation, and one that can take place amicably, to preserve the needs of taxpayers as well as those that work for taxpayers. According to the argument I seem to be hearing – people would prefer to pay teachers / firefighters / police officers the lowest rate they possibly can. But when these wages continue to drop – so does the amount of qualified people willing to take those jobs. Being a public sector worker does not mean that those people don’t have educational loans, do not spend 8 hours a day with your child, respond when your house is on fire. Do we trust politicians to set the pay grade, then wonder in bewilderment why people drop out of public service like flies? Bargaining is good for business. It would be nice if unions were not needed to make common sense changes, unfortunately in today’s world, the employer is no longer the small business that is connected to the community and to the people who work for them, and everyone is dependent on the success of that business. Reality is much different than the ideal.

  • Texasron

    The Wisconsin Senators are going back to Illinois to get the ballots they forgot. Remember it was in Illinois where the Daley regime controlled every election in the state.

  • http://www.hotexchangerates.com/ exchangerates

    Excellent. The time for being gentlemanly (for want of a better term) is long past.

    The democrats obviously do not care how they win. Time for the GOP to change the rules that they're used to playing by.

  • John42

    Supreme Galooty, thanks for your response, I agree this is not the best forum for this type of discussion which is quite complex. Some quick general thoughts though:
    I grew up in a family of small business owners, the family pharmacy which has been passed down in my family for generations. I find this type of situation ideal, although a dying business model for America. My argument for collective bargaining, is that it encompasses many different issues aside from pay, and that the people who are actually doing the job everyday, know best how to improve it. For example, pilots know that they should not work over a certain hours before they become too tired. Yet they will not get this concession through common sense for safety measures – they have to fight for the right to make our flight safer. Nurses have also fought for how many patients they are required to see. Hospitals have often pushed more and more patients on nurses as the quality of care continues to erode to save costs. The patient and the nurse has no say. Most people end up joining a union as a last resort, because they care about making their workplace better, for them, and for those they serve – and they are not able to achieve this any other way. Things that might be included in a collective bargaining agreement: opportunity for training, a limit on the number of students in a classroom, the need to have a process to address sexual harassment (to avoid lawsuits), wages, hours, benefits.

    How is pay set in the first place? This is indeed a negotiation, and one that can take place amicably, to preserve the needs of taxpayers as well as those that work for taxpayers. According to the argument I seem to be hearing – people would prefer to pay teachers / firefighters / police officers the lowest rate they possibly can. But when these wages continue to drop – so does the amount of qualified people willing to take those jobs. Being a public sector worker does not mean that those people don’t have educational loans, do not spend 8 hours a day with your child, respond when your house is on fire. Do we trust politicians to set the pay grade, then wonder in bewilderment why people drop out of public service like flies? Bargaining is good for business. It would be nice if unions were not needed to make common sense changes, unfortunately in today’s world, the employer is no longer the small business that is connected to the community and to the people who work for them, and everyone is dependent on the success of that business. Reality is much different than the ideal.