Free Syrian Army Rises to Take on Assad

Ryan Mauro is a fellow with the Clarionproject.org, the founder of WorldThreats.com and a frequent national security analyst for Fox News Channel. He can be contacted at ryanmauro1986@gmail.com.


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The peaceful uprising in Syria is becoming a violent revolt as the Free Syria Army rises to defend the people against the Assad regime. Close to 3,000 civilians have been murdered, 20,000 are imprisoned and 7,500 are living in refugee camps in Turkey. Pleas for foreign intervention are growing, anti-regime militias are forming, and military defectors continue to join the ranks of the Free Syria Army. With every protester killed, civil war becomes more likely.

On September 23, the Free Officers Movement officially merged into the Free Syria Army, led by Colonel Riad al-Assad. The leader of the Free Officers Movement, Lt. Col. Hussein Harmoush, disappeared on August 27 after meeting with Turkish officials. He was later seen on Syrian state television parroting the regime’s propaganda. The Erdogan government has been accused of handing him over to Assad in exchange for nine members of the Kurdistan Workers Party, which Turkey denies. The Foreign Minister laughably claims, “He himself decided to go back.” At the same time, Turkey is threatening Assad over his brutal crackdowns and has hit him with an arms embargo.

“You cannot remove this regime except by force and bloodshed. But our losses will not be worse than we have right now, with the killings, the torture and the dumping of bodies,” Col. Riad al-Assad said. So far, the Free Syria Army has killed at least 80 of the regime’s soldiers and hired mercenaries. Another report put the number of casualties among the regime’s security forces since the uprising began at about 700.

The Free Syria Army’s strategy is to replicate the success of the Libyan rebels. For now, it wants to defend protesters as they come under attack and expand its ranks with defectors. It hopes to kick the regime’s forces out of an area in the northern part of the country, creating the Syrian equivalent of Libya’s Benghazi. From this safe haven, it hopes to win international support and ultimately bring Assad down. The rest of the opposition has yet to endorse taking up arms. The Local Coordination Committees in Syria are still opposed to violence.

The Free Syria Army and some other opposition groups are now asking for foreign help. The Syrian National Council rejects any intervention that “compromises Syria’s sovereignty” but is asking for a no-fly zone.  The Syrian Revolution General Commission in Washington D.C. wants “limited Western intervention” that includes an arms embargo, a no-fly zone, economic pressure and a peacekeeping mission to protect civilians. Farid Ghadry of the Reform Party of Syria, another D.C.-based group, is calling on the West to directly support the Free Syria Army with arms and logistics.

The FSA is hoping that foreign allies will provide it with weapons, enact a naval blockade, and give it financing from the frozen assets of regime officials. It is also asking for a U.N. resolution expressing support for its fight and demanding that the regime release political prisoners and soldiers it imprisoned for refusing to fire on civilians. It also wants the U.N. to call on Assad to return his soldiers to their barracks. On October 4, Russia and China vetoed a U.N. resolution threatening the regime with sanctions. “The courageous people of Syria can now see clearly who supports their yearning for liberty and universal rights and who does not,” said U.S. ambassador to the U.N., Susan Rice.

U.S. ambassador to Syria, Robert Ford, implores both sides to forgo violence and is telling the opposition to not count on the U.S. military for backup. “One of the things we’ve told the opposition is that they should not think we are going to treat Syria the same way we treated Libya,” Ford said. He is warning the Free Syria Army that “you don’t have enough force to fight the Syrian army, you’re not even close. We have to be realistic.” He suggests that the opposition be patient as sanctions take their toll on the regime. At the same time, a State Department spokesman was careful not to condemn the Free Syria Army, saying it isn’t surprising that people have begun “to use violence against the military as an act of self-preservation.”

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  • crackerjack

    Let's wait and see the "Free Syrian Army" become a terror organization as soon as it has defeated Assad and moves on to free Syrians from Israeli occupation in Golan.

  • mlcblog

    Oh, for a Presidential administration who would support these freedom fighters!!

    I do not agree that they would necessarily turn bad. There are still many strong Christians among Middle Eastern people in general and in Syria for sure.

    Oops. On further reading I come to the worry note. "Accordingly, individuals…[say] Islam does provide them with inspiration and strength but they do not fight for Islam and their goals are generally secular.” …so they are in agreement with Islam, inspired by it.

  • miami111

    @mlcblog @crackerjack Of course they're inspired by Islam, they're MUSLIMS for Christ' sake. Is that a bad thing? Anyhow, Syria is different than Yemen, Afghanistan and all those terrorist harboring countries. The Syrian people are Muslim in majority, but are way more liberal and civilized than the other countries I just mentionned. So no, there is no chance that the Free Syrian Army could become a terrorist organization. Anyways, the Assad regime is a major terrorist organization by itself, and it must be annihilated.

  • Jan Knoss

    Turkey,s pimp role will have a decissive role on the revolt in Syria.While the goverment is Sunnite ,the position on the ground is determined,more often than not, by the whole range of mafia cliques sponsored by the Police and in league with the Alawite-Kurdish factions.
    The trouble with the ptotesters line of thinking is that they have failed so far to recgonize their plight. Saudi Arabia ,for instance ,is weary of provoking Iran and its Syrian protoge: Dr. Bashar .
    I am not against the House of Saud clinging to power.What I am pointing out is that should the House of Saud conclude that the revolt in SYRIA may affect them advrsely,they will not hesitate to work even with Iran and undermine this noble uprising!!

  • matt

    Iraq took 8 years.

  • matt

    Once it is all in chaos and Assad has his hands full he is not going to be able to use his missiles to hit outside the country. Then we can end it, shock and awe. And once it is clear that he is doomed, 'faster' means crush it soon, the PLA/Russia will change sides at the UN R2P otherwise the Russians will lose their base.

  • Ellen Trumpler

    If we all sit back and watch this mindless slaughter of civilians, we are all participating in a crime against humanity. The time to intervene is now, and I believe we will. God is greater than this.

  • قاتل الاسد المجرم

    help our brothers in syria