Too Much Higher Education


Pages: 1 2

Too much of anything is just as much a misallocation of resources as it is too little, and that applies to higher education just as it applies to everything else. A recent study from The Center for College Affordability and Productivity titled “From Wall Street to Wal-Mart,” by Richard Vedder, Christopher Denhart, Matthew Denhart, Christopher Matgouranis and Jonathan Robe, explains that college education for many is a waste of time and money. More than one-third of currently working college graduates are in jobs that do not require a degree. An essay by Vedder that complements the CCAP study reports that there are “one-third of a million waiters and waitresses with college degrees.” The study says Vedder — distinguished professor of economics at Ohio University, an adjunct scholar at the American Enterprise Institute and director of CCAP — “was startled a year ago when the person he hired to cut down a tree had a master’s degree in history, the fellow who fixed his furnace was a mathematics graduate, and, more recently, a TSA airport inspector (whose job it was to ensure that we took our shoes off while going through security) was a recent college graduate.”

The nation’s college problem is far deeper than the fact that people simply are overqualified for particular jobs. Citing the research of AEI scholar Charles Murray’s book “Real Education” (2008), Vedder says: “The number going to college exceeds the number capable of mastering higher levels of intellectual inquiry. This leads colleges to alter their mission, watering down the intellectual content of what they do.” In other words, colleges dumb down courses so that the students they admit can pass them. Murray argues that only a modest proportion of our population has the cognitive skills, work discipline, drive, maturity and integrity to master truly higher education. He says that educated people should be able to read and understand classic works, such as John Locke’s “Essay Concerning Human Understanding” or William Shakespeare’s “King Lear.” These works are “insightful in many ways,” he says, but a person of average intelligence “typically lacks both the motivation and ability to do so.” Mastering complex forms of mathematics is challenging but necessary to develop rigorous thinking and is critical in some areas of science and engineering.

Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa, authors of “Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses” (2011), report on their analysis of more than 2,300 undergraduates at 24 institutions.

Pages: 1 2

  • Lfox328

    Yeah, but I'd hate to have to be the one that had to tell a parent that THEIR kid just wasn't smart enough for college.

  • PETER GRUSH

    Just think about all those college professors pretending to teach those average and below students who are pretending to learn pontificating on the world about which they know nothing.

  • Andrew Herrmann

    Vedder is an elitist prick.

  • Furnace Repairs

    Having to fix a furnace is something many HVAC customers have to deal with. The easiest way would be to acquire assistance from a qualified furnace repairman, although this may not always be the cheapest solution.

    For more information about furnace repair click here.