Palestinian Authority President Refuses To End Lenient Sentences for Men Who Kill Their Sisters and Daughters

Daniel Greenfield, a Shillman Journalism Fellow at the Freedom Center, is a New York writer focusing on radical Islam. He is completing a book on the international challenges America faces in the 21st century.


What happens if we leave Afghanistan is the same thing that happens if we give money to Palestine

This latest development in Palestinian statehood has been brought to you by every country that voted to upgrade the Palestinian Authority’s status at the United Nations.

President Mahmoud Abbas has no plans to amend laws that reduce sentences for suspects who claim an “honor” defense for murdering women, his legal adviser says.

“Why change it? This would cause serious problems,” Hassan al-Ouri told Ma’an, adding that such a reform would “not benefit women.”

Al-Ouri says the president will not change the go-to clauses for lawyers seeking leniency for clients who claim they committed murder to defend family “honor.”

Articles 97 to 100 of the Jordanian Penal Code, in force in the West Bank, still offer reduced sentences for any act of battery or murder committed in a “state of rage.”

In 2009, Abbas ratified the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women, but al-Ouri, the legal adviser, says it will only be implemented “so long as it doesn’t contravene Islamic code.”

“Look, we are for total equality but if there is a basic tenet of Islamic code that we would be forced to change under CEDAW, then people would revolt and brand us as non-believers,” al-Ouri said.

The Palestinian Authority is absolutely for equal rights, except they’re also for defending honor killings, which we’re told has nothing to do with Islam, and yet the legal advisor to the President of the Palestinian Authority appears rather certain that it does.

Either way women will go on being murdered by their brothers and fathers and they will go on receiving lenient sentences and American tax dollars will go on paying for the courts where those cases are heard and those sentences are carried out.