Saddam Hussein Party Running for Office in Jordan

Daniel Greenfield, a Shillman Journalism Fellow at the Freedom Center, is a New York writer focusing on radical Islam. He is completing a book on the international challenges America faces in the 21st century.


The Muslim world is to feel good stories as a house on fire is to a home cooked meal. This one comes to us from Jordan which is slowly and hesitantly experimenting with democracy… and getting Saddam Hussein.

The Board of Commissioners in the The Independent Elections Commission (IEC) rejected the name of a national list which chose former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein’s name, although it accepted the applications of the candidates provided that they change the name of the list.

The surprise did not stop at the name of the list, but the second surprise was that one of the candidates at the head of the list was named Saddam Hamdan Hussein.

He added that he will fight in the upcoming parliamentary elections, saying that “Saddam Hussein’s name was chosen because people in Jordan loved him.”

Well Saddam Hussein was fairly popular in Jordan.

There’s no word on exactly what the Saddam Hussein Party and Saddam Hussein stand for, but it’s a safe bet that it’s probably not anything good.

In other Saddam Hussein related news, Saddam Hussein Jabari was arrested in Israel for trying to stab a soldier with a knife. Relatives are claiming that he’s only 13 and should be released immediately. It’s likely though that he’s a bit older than that as Saddam wasn’t doing anything too noteworthy in 1999.

The political fortunes of the Saddam Hussein Party are unknown, but Hitler did fairly well in the Palestinian Authority elections.

A terrorist known in his hometown as “Hitler” – both for his physical resemblance to the German dictator and for his policies – has swept local primaries and will represent his district for the ruling Fatah party in upcoming Palestinian legislative elections, according to Palestinian sources.

Jamal Abu Al-Rub, a leader of the Al Aqsa Martyrs Brigades, won the Fatah primaries in the northern Samarian village of Qabatya, just outside Jenin, election officials say. He was one of dozens of terrorists and militant leaders to dominate the local elections.

The Al Aqsa Martyrs Brigades, founded in 2000, is a terrorist group responsible for dozens of deadly suicide bombings and hundreds of shooting attacks against Israeli civilians.

Al-Rub has publicly executed Palestinians his group suspected of collaborating with Israel and is accused by the Jewish state of planning several terror attacks.

A source close to the Al Aqsa Martyrs Brigades, speaking on condition of anonymity, told WND, “If you ask around in the West Bank who is Abu Al-Rub, most people won’t know. But when you ask them about the guy nicknamed Hitler, everyone knows exactly who he is.

Unfortunately though Palestinian Authority standards for genocidal dictator impersonators seem to be fairly low because aside from having a mustache Al-Rub really does not look much like Hitler. And it’s not even the right kind of mustache.

And here he is shaking hands with an extremely unenthusiastic Abbas who does not seem to be fond of Hitler despite authoring a Holocaust revisionist paper.

A bio for the Palestinian Hitler mentions that the name of the original Hitler “remained present as it is distinguished by his attractiveness and presence made him one of the most influential figures of the twentieth century.”

Hitler’s name however led to some confusion in the elections. “By Allah,” Hitler says, “I had to write my title and my name and if I did I would not have succeeded because the vast majority know me the title of Hitler, even over the name Jamal Abualrb.”

But not all Palestinian Arabs are fond of Hitler. As a member of the Al Aqsa Martyrs Brigade, Hitler has been battling against his Hamas rivals, leading one Hamas supporter to cry out, “Shame on you Hitler, for doing the bidding of the Zionists.”

  • http://www.adinakutnicki.com AdinaK

    Like a pig in a poke, there is no such (kosher) animal as democracy in the Arab/Muslim world. It is as alien to their thinking as dancing is to a cripple. It ain't gonna happen.

    And the fact that democracy is marketed under the coinage of 'Arab Spring' isn't worth diddly squat. And if Hamas's win is not enough of an anti-'democratic' exhibit, then nothing more will suffice.

    As such, if Hitler were Arab he would have won them over too, as their leader. Heck, they still use the Nazi salute! To wit, since there is NO moderate Islam, there is NO chance that any semblance of western democracy – with freedom and liberty as its underpinnings – will take root – http://adinakutnicki.com/2012/08/21/repeat-until-

    Clear as a bell.

    Adina Kutnicki, Israel – http://www.adinakutnicki.com/about/

    • JacksonPearson

      The word or term democracy in Islam is not only a misnomer, but a sham.
      Islam is total enslavement of a person's body, will and soul. Question or attempt to leave Allah's paradise on earth, and instead of green pastures, you'll lose your head or be sent to a stoning ditch for a permanent attitude adjustment. .

      • Whitney

        Uh, I'm not sure anyone mentioned anything about Islam. There are frequently far deeper ideologies which are not always based in the religion. Support for Saddam by the Arab world (in Jordan and throughout the region) is a complex issue that spans much deeper than just Islam.
        It's a complicated relationship, culture affecting the religion and the religion affecting the culture – but they are not one in the same. Careful with making general conclusions.

        • JacksonPearson

          In your opine, do you believe there are many Christians or Jews fighting in and for the Arab Spring. Other than Islamists, who else would the above poster be referring to.

  • Whitney

    Confused if this article is meant to be actual journalism or a fun opinion/commentary piece.

    Since I’m living in Jordan, I’m not thrilled with the idea of a party running under Sadam Hussein’s name and legacy but “we dont know what they stand for, but we can assume..” – well, we shouldn’t assume, should we? We should make some phone calls to local organizations or media outlets and ask about it, shouldn’t we? Journalism isn’t witty assumptions based on what we expect to find, before we’ve actually found out, or, I don’t know, done some basic research. You say the Middle East is slowly and hesitantly playing with democracy as if they are children. Yes, they are light years behind and still have ways to go, but by not doing any substantial research for this piece you’ve ignored if not undermined the dozens of organizations and countless people, foreigners and locals, working improve upon the democratization process. This article also combines a hodge podge of information – somehow attempting to allude to a correlation between the actions of Sadam’s distance 13 year old relative to the actions of a political party in another country named after him. As if this teenage’s action is somehow reflective of what is to come from this political party. And even if that was your case that the party would have a violent agenda, why don’t you correlate this facts based on research or facts?

    To be clear, I find it very disheartening that politics could be fueled by horrendous figures such as Saddam or Hitler. What is also disappointing is you’ve missed the opportunity to actually report on anything meaningful relating to these issues. Is the arbitrary information/opinion stated meant to be passed off as an informative article or draw any substantial conclusions about…anything?

    • JacksonPearson

      Correct me if I am wrong, but Adolph Hitler's "Mein Kamph" was translated into many different Arabic dialectics and is still a best seller in the Middle East. So the author of this thread is not off color by relating Islam to Nazis. Matter of fact, many Arab writers and scholars regularly take up old Adoph's mantra of exterminating (genocide) Israel. So I'd say you're either grossly out of touch, or really full of crap.

  • Whitney

    Hey Jackson – thanks for the message, the positive touch at the end warms my heart.
    I don't disagree with you – my point was I wish the author had included some substantial facts or background information or research to support what he was saying, like you have attempted above. That was my point. Take it easy, buddy.

  • JacksonPearson

    Daniel Greenfield has been around for awhile, and is a very astute and dedicated person, as are most authors that post on this web site. Daniel does his homework. You can find more on him here: http://sultanknish.blogspot.com/