Top Muslim Chaplain Accused of Savage Torture and Murder

Meet the monster behind the Muslim Council of Britain and the Rushdie protests.

Bangladesh’s War of Independence holds some interesting stories and the fact that one of the war criminals who tortured and murdered independence activists to maintain Pakistan’s grip on the country found a warm Islamist nest in the UK is no surprise at all.

Islamists have repeatedly gone into exile in Europe, to then return and seize power. And Chowdhury Mueen-Uddin appears to be a particularly nasty species of savage. The NHS is renowned for its kill rates, but it’s still ridiculous that a top chaplain was responsible for such atrocities.

Mr Mueen-Uddin was working as a journalist for a newspaper called the Daily Purbadesh in the capital Dhaka. But he was also said to be a secret member of an Islamic terrorist group called the Al-Badr Brigade, which abducted and killed leading figures of the independence movement for the Pakistani military.

Bangladesh’s International Crimes Tribunal (ICT) – which has been set up to try the country’s most notorious war criminals still alive – has announced that it has completed its year-long investigation into Mr Mueen-Uddin. The ICT’s prosecution wing will announce formal charges against him in the next few days, said a senior official at the tribunal.

The ICT has so far arrested nine alleged war criminals and is trying them in special courts in front of a panel of three judges. The nine are some of the most prominent Islamist leaders of the country, who are accused of killing thousands of independence activists and leaders during the 1971 war.

Sanaul Huq, the Inspector-General of Bangladesh’s national police force, who is co-ordinating the ICT investigation, said ‘They abducted an eye doctor, and then gouged his eyes out before killing him and dumping his body.

‘They abducted a cardiologist and cut out his heart before killing him and dumping his body.

‘They kidnapped a woman journalist, and cut her breasts off before killing her. Her decomposing body was later found with her breasts cut off.

These acts might be described as “savage”, but that would lead to protests of Islamophobia.

Mr Mueen-Uddin was one of the chief Islamic leaders who mobilised thousands of British Muslims to protest against the publication of Salman Rushdie’s controversial book, The Satanic Verses, in 1989

Over the decades, he became one of Britain’s most influential Muslim leaders, was instrumental in setting up the Muslim Council of Britain (MCB), and is now one of the trustees of the UK’s leading Islamic charity, Muslim Aid.

He is accused of personally abducting six journalists – including a local BBC reporter – three doctors and nine academics from Dhaka University between December 10 and 15, 1971.

The UK could be rid of him by extraditing him back to Bangladesh, but of course that won’t happen. Not even if he murdered a BBC reporter. Because Bangladesh has the dreaded death penalty.

Any request by the Bangladeshi government to the UK to hand back Mr Mueen-Uddin is likely to be tricky because the two countries have no formal extradition treaty. Also, the UK usually does not send suspects to a country where there is a possibility that they may be sentenced to death. A further difficulty is that it is believed that Mr Mueen-Uddin has been granted British citizenship by the Home Office.