Green Evangelicals ‘Masquerade’ New EPA Rule as ‘Pro-Life’

Mark Tooley is President of the Institute on Religion and Democracy (www.theird.org) and author of Methodism and Politics in the Twentieth Century. Follow him on Twitter: @markdtooley.


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Over the last year, the Evangelical Environmental Network (EEN) has spent hundreds of thousands of dollars in ads promoting as “pro-life” new power plant regulations from the Obama Administration.    The aim is to persuade America’s largest religious demographic to embrace ardent environmentalism as intrinsic to their faith.

This week, EEN’s chief testified before a Congressional committee ostensibly on behalf of a “growing” number of evangelicals who are now “consistently pro-life” by adopting political causes of the left on poverty and the environment, according to my assistant Kristin Rudolph who listened in. Reverend Mitchell Hescox insisted that faithful Christians should back new rules potentially costing over $9 billion annually so as to defend the “unborn” from mercury.

Evidently the plan is that evangelicals, whom The Washington Post once infamously called “’poor, undereducated and easily led, will enlist in the zealous green movement after understanding that the “unborn” are now the beneficiaries.  Seemingly, evangelical lemmings are expected not to think through such complexities as cost/benefit analysis or whether the expensive and expansive new regulations actually address a real threat to large numbers.

Expanding the definition of “pro-life” to include environmentalism, for starts, ultimately neutralizes the label altogether.  For this reason, secular left-wing philanthropies, like the Rockefellers Brothers Fund, are possibly shrewd to back EEN’s drive for “pro-life” elasticity.   One EEN television ad portrays a pastor warning:  “I expect members of Congress to protect the unborn.”  An EEN’s radio ad featured the pastor asking Michigan voters to thank their liberal Democratic Senators Carl Levin and Debbie Stabenow “for their leadership, and let them know you support continued efforts to keep the unborn safe from mercury pollution.”  By implication, members of Congress who are pro-life on abortion but don’t succumb to the mercury scare campaign are actually less than pro-life.

Congressional staff noted the latest EPA proposal has been “characterized as the most expensive rule ever imposed by the agency on the power sector.” Its implementation would reportedly cost the average family in some areas over $80 annually in increased electricity costs.  (Critics allege the cost could be twice as high.) This cost must seem minor to elitist environmentalists.  But are increased electricity bills for the poor and working class really “pro-life?”  And could that over $9 billion annually in direct costs to the power industry, which critics claim will actually be much higher, be better spent?

Congressman John Shimkus (R – IL) told Rev. Hescox, as recounted by Kristin Rudolph:  “You are masquerading for an environmental cause which I reject and which many in the pro-life community [reject].” And he declared:  “We in the pro-life community take great offense when an evangelical movement tries to usurp the meaning of ‘pro-life.’”  Rev. Hescox countered that “pro-life” must include “environmental health” and “anti-poverty.”  But toxicologist Julie Goodman, a Harvard adjunct professor, testified: “The vast majority of the benefits [from the EPA rule] … are not from mercury reductions, but rather from highly imprecise estimates of mortality reductions from decreasing emissions of fine particulate matter.”

Right before the congressional hearing, pro-life leaders released a letter rejecting EEN’s attempt to appropriate the term for its environmentalist agenda as “disingenuous,” “dangerous,” bound to “confuse voters,” and to “divide the pro-life vote.”  They added:  “This doesn’t mean we should ignore environmental risks. It does mean they should not be portrayed as pro-life. Genuinely pro-life people will usually desire to reduce other risks as well—guided by cost/benefit analysis. But to call those issues ‘pro-life’ is to obscure the meaning of the term.”

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  • Guest

    Neither pro-life, nor evangelical.

  • StephenD

    Another term being hi-jacked.
    First, they call themselves "Liberal" while there is absolutely nothing Liberal about a Totalitarian system of Governing which is the ultimate end to following their protocols.
    Then they call themselves "Progressives" when they are regressive to Socialism and Communism that ALWAYS ends in the subjugation of its adherents with untold numbers of death and destruction.
    They call themselves "Pro-Choice" but give no choice to the person in the womb.
    They say they want the power with "the people" when in fact; they want a select few elites dictating to the balance of society.
    They say they want equality when they really want to do away with the Constitution – the only thing that ensures equality under the law; The only thing that would keep mob rule in check.

    They can continue to hi-jack the terminology but the ideas are as old as their source which is straight from "The Father of Lies."

  • http://priscillaking.blogspot.com Priscilla King

    The question is whether Old Left "anti-poverty" efforts really relieve poverty (hasn't worked yet for any country that's tried it)…and whether New Left "environmentalist" ploys really reduce damage to the environment! Christians are called to relieve poverty and protect the environment, but we need to beware of subversion by a basically antichristian, let's say "statist" rather than Communist/Fascist/Socialist/etc., political movement.

  • topeka

    … and not environmental either.

    To believe one can squander literally mountains of resources to remove mercury (at levels so low, one will never know if its there in most cases…) is not stupid, not ignorant, and not insane:

    it is deliberate malicious evil.

    Especially when these are the same people hyperventilating over the french fry bulbs: In twenty years they will discover their errors have created more diseases.

    For example, the pot babies and pot heads will be suffering from more pot related diseases – now since we can't hold pot accountable for the epidemiology we already know, rather than adding more fuel to the fire, the Left will blame the french fry bulbs (which also waste energy).

    And no doubt that will be our fault too…

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