A Vastly Changed Middle East


U.S. President Barack Obama speaks about Syria during a joint news conference with Swedish Prime Minister in Stockholm

Originally published by the Jerusalem Post.

A week and a half ago, Syria’s Kurds announced they are setting up an autonomous region in northeastern Syria.

The announcement came after the Kurds wrested control over a chain of towns from al-Qaida in the ever metastasizing Syrian civil war.

The Kurds’ announcement enraged their nominal Sunni allies – including the al-Qaida forces they have been combating – in the opposition to the Assad regime. It also rendered irrelevant US efforts to reach a peace deal between the Syrian regime and the rebel forces at a peace conference in Geneva.

But more important than what the Kurds’ action means for the viability of the Obama administration’s Syria policy, it shows just how radically the strategic landscape has changed and continues to change, not just in Syria but throughout the Arab world.

The revolutionary groundswell that has beset the Arab world for the past three years has brought dynamism and uncertainty to a region that has known mainly stasis and status quo for the past 500 years. For 400 years, the Middle East was ruled by the Ottoman Turks. Anticipating the breakup of the Ottoman Empire during World War I, the British and the French quickly carved up the Ottoman possessions, dividing them between themselves. What emerged from their actions were the national borders of the Arab states – and Israel – that have remained largely intact since 1922.

As Yoel Guzansky and Erez Striem from the Institute for National Security Studies wrote in a paper published this week, while the borders of Arab states remain largely unchanged, the old borders no longer reflect the reality on the ground.

“As a result of the regional upheavals, tribal, sectarian, and ethnic identities have become more pronounced than ever, which may well lead to a change in the borders drawn by the colonial powers a century ago that have since been preserved by Arab autocrats.”

Guzansky and Striem explained, “The iron-fisted Arab rulers were an artificial glue of sorts, holding together different, sometimes hostile sects in an attempt to form a single nation state.

Now, the de facto changes in the Middle East map could cause far-reaching geopolitical shifts affecting alliance formations and even the global energy market.”

The writers specifically discussed the breakdown of national governments and the consequent growing irrelevance of national borders in Syria, Iraq, Libya and Yemen.

And while it is true that the dissolution of central government authority is most acute in Syria, Iraq, Libya and Yemen, in every Arab state national authorities are under siege, stressed, or engaged in countering direct threats to their rule. Although central authorities retain control in Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Morocco, Tunisia and Bahrain, they all contend with unprecedented challenges. As a consequence, today it is impossible to take for granted that the regime’s interests in any Arab state will necessarily direct the actions of the residents of that state, or that a regime now in power will remain in power tomorrow.

Guzansky and Striem note that the current state of flux presents Israel with both challenges and opportunities. As they put it, “The disintegration of states represents at least a temporary deterioration in Israel’s strategic situation because it is attended by instability liable to trickle over into neighboring states…. But the changes also mean dissolution of the regular armies that posed a threat in the past and present opportunities for Israel to build relations with different minorities with the potential to seize the reins of government in the future.”

Take the Kurds for example. The empowerment of the Kurds in Syria – as in Iraq – presents a strategic opportunity for Israel. Israel has cultivated and maintained an alliance with the Kurds throughout the region for the past 45 years.

Although Kurdish politics are fraught with internal clashes and power struggles, on balance, the empowerment of the Kurds at the expense of the central governments in Damascus and Baghdad is a major gain for Israel.

And the Kurds are not the only group whose altered status since the onset of the revolutionary instability in the Arab world presents Israel with new opportunities. Among the disparate factions in the disintegrating Arab lands from North Africa to the Persian Gulf are dozens of groups that will be thrilled to receive Israeli assistance and, in return, be willing to cooperate with Israel on a whole range of issues.

To be sure, these new allies are not likely to share Israeli values. And many may be no more than the foreign affairs equivalent of a one-night stand. But Israel also is not obliged to commit itself to any party for the long haul. Transactional alliances are valuable because they are based on shared interests, and they last for as long as the actors perceive those interests as shared ones.

Over the past week, we have seen a similar transformation occurring on a regional and indeed global level, as the full significance of the Obama administration’s withdrawal of US power from the region becomes better understood.

When word got out two weeks ago about the US decision to accept and attempt to push through a deal with Iran that would strip the international sanctions regime of meaning in return for cosmetic Iranian concessions that will not significantly impact Iran’s completion of its nuclear weapons program, attempts were made by some Israeli and many American policy-makers to make light of the significance of President Barack Obama’s moves.

But on Sunday night, Channel 10 reported that far from an opportunistic bid to capitalize on a newfound moderation in Tehran, the draft agreement was the result of months-long secret negotiations between Obama’s consigliere Valerie Jarrett and Iranian negotiators.

According to the report, which was denied by the White House, Jarrett, Obama’s Iranian-born consigliere, conducted secret talks with Iranian negotiators for the past several months. The draft agreement that betrayed US allies throughout the Arab world, and shattered Israeli and French confidence in the US’s willingness to prevent Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons, was presented to negotiators in Geneva as a fait accompli. Israel and Saudi Arabia, like other US regional allies were left in the dark about its contents. As we saw, it was only after the French and the British divulged the details of the deal to Israel and Saudi Arabia that the Israelis, Saudis and French formed an ad hoc alliance to scuttle the deal at the last moment.

The revelation of Jarrett’s long-standing secret talks with the Iranians showed that the Obama administration’s decision to cut a deal with the mullahs was a well-thought-out, long-term policy to use appeasement of the world’s leading sponsor of terrorism as a means to enable the US to withdraw from the Middle East. The fact that the deal in question would also pave the way for Iran to become a nuclear power, and so imperil American national security, was clearly less of a concern for Obama and his team than realizing their goal of withdrawing the US from the Middle East.

Just as ethnic, regional and religious factions wasted no time filling the vacuum created in the Arab world by the disintegration of central governments, so the states of the region and the larger global community wasted no time finding new allies to replace the United States.

Voicing this new understanding, Foreign Minister Avigdor Liberman said Wednesday that it is time for Israel to seek out new allies.

In his words, “The ties with the US are deteriorating.

They have problems in North Korea, Pakistan, Iran, Syria, Egypt, China, and their own financial and immigration troubles. Thus I ask – what is our place in the international arena? Israel must seek more allies with common interests.”

In seeking to block Iran’s nuclear weapons program, Israel has no lack of allies. America’s withdrawal has caused a regional realignment in which Israel and France are replacing the US as the protectors of the Sunni Arab states of the Persian Gulf.

France has ample reason to act. Iran has attacked French targets repeatedly over the past 34 years. France built Saddam Hussein’s nuclear reactor while Saddam was at war with Iran.

France has 10 million Muslim citizens who attend mosques financed by Saudi Arabia.

Moreover, France has strong commercial interests in the Persian Gulf. There is no doubt that France will be directly harmed if Iran becomes a nuclear power.

Although Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu’s meeting Wednesday with Russian President Vladimir Putin did not bring about a realignment of Russian interests with the Franco- Sunni-Israeli anti-Iran consortium, the very fact that Netanyahu went to Moscow sent a clear message to the world community that in its dealings with outside powers, Israel no longer feels itself constrained by its alliance with the US.

And that was really the main purpose of the visit. Netanyahu didn’t care that Putin rejected his position on Iran. Israel didn’t need Russia to block Jarrett’s deal. Iran is no longer interested in even feigning interest in a nuclear deal. It was able to neutralize US power in the region, and cast the US’s regional allies into strategic disarray just by convincing Obama and Jarrett that a deal was in the offing. This is why Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei again threatened to annihilate Israel this week. He doesn’t think he needs to sugar coat his intentions any longer.

It is not that the US has become a nonentity in the region overnight, and despite Obama’s ill-will toward Israel, under his leadership the US has not become a wholly negative actor. The successful Israeli-US test of the David’s Sling short-range ballistic missile interceptor on Wednesday was a clear indication of the prevailing importance of Israel’s ties with the US. So, too, the delivery this week of the first of four US fast missile boats to the Egyptian navy, which will improve Egypt’s ability to secure maritime traffic in the Suez Canal, showed that the US remains a key player in the region. Congress’s unwillingness to bow to Obama’s will and weaken sanctions on Iran similarly is a positive portent for a post-Obama American return to the region.

But when America returns, it will likely find a vastly changed regional landscape. Nations are disintegrating, only to reintegrate in new groupings.

Monolithic regimes are giving way to domestic fissures and generational changes. As for America’s allies, some will welcome its return.

Others will scowl and turn away. All will have managed to survive, and even thrive in the absence of a guiding hand from Washington, and all will consequently need America less.

This changed landscape will in turn require the US to do some long, hard thinking about where its interests lie, and to develop new strategies for advancing them.

So perhaps in the fullness of time, we may all end up better off for this break in US strategic rationality.

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  • itaintmojo

    It’s fairly safe to say now that us policy towards Israel has shifted in a less friendly direction. On settlements, Obama and Kerry are clear in espousing the false narrative that they are illegitimate. The shift won’t be complete till Obama leaves in three years. He has lots of time to continue his policy reversal towards America’s best friend. After these talks fail Obama will blame Israel and support BDS. Then he will have two more years to further solidify that position unless congress stops him somehow. But he is moving in slow methodical increments and Obama might catch everybody off gaurd. Obama is a master liar manipulator, and law bender, if not breaker. This break in policy might turn up too much damage for the next administration to repair. And then if Hillary is the next POTUS, it is doubtful she will help restore the friendship. So while I love this author, and she may be right about the break bring a blessing, we can really only watch and wait for Obama’s actions to see how far reaching he intends his policy shift on Israel to go.

  • itaintmojo

    It’s fairly safe to say now that us policy towards Israel has shifted in a less friendly direction. On settlements, Obama and Kerry are clear in espousing the false narrative that they are illegitimate. The shift won’t be complete till Obama leaves in three years. He has lots of time to continue his policy reversal towards America’s best friend. After these talks fail Obama will blame Israel and support BDS. Then he will have two more years to further solidify that position unless congress stops him somehow. But he is moving in slow methodical increments and Obama might catch everybody off gaurd. Obama is a master liar manipulator, and law bender, if not breaker. This break in policy might turn up too much damage for the next administration to repair. And then if Hillary is the next POTUS, it is doubtful she will help restore the friendship. So while I love this author, and she may be right about the break bring a blessing, we can really only watch and wait for Obama’s actions to see how far reaching he intends his policy shift on Israel to go.

  • Riffak Ledifni

    The real spring belongs to the Kurds in the Middle East. They have been uprising against Arab dictators in the Middle East for decades.
    Without Free Kurds and Kurdistan there won’t be peace or democracy in the Arab world. Not In Iraq, not in Libya not in Syria. not anywhere.

  • Riffak Ledifni

    The real spring belongs to the Kurds in the Middle East. They have been uprising against Arab dictators in the Middle East for decades.
    Without Free Kurds and Kurdistan there won’t be peace or democracy in the Arab world. Not In Iraq, not in Libya not in Syria. not anywhere.

    • William_Bradford

      We’ll see what happens with the Turks, and the Kurds. The PPK has been engaged in Turkish cross-boarder terror attacks for some number of years. There will be no Kurdish independence without some sort of Turkish rapprochement. The Turks have been fairly adamant.

    • http://www.teaparty.org/about-us/ Nixys

      Agreed. The Kurds are the key to the future of the Middle East. Iran, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, and Israel are all fairly coherent ideological and ethnic nation states. Turkey mostly is as well. The rest are just lines on a map that make no sense whatsover, mostly because of the Kurds. Syria and Iraq aren’t really nation states, they’re just land being fought over by Shia Muslims and Sunni Muslims funded by Iran and Saudi Arabia, in a quest for hegemony. Iran won hegemony in Iraq and Syria, so Saudi Arabia and Israel (and Egypt to a lesser extent) are now locked into a defacto alliance to take back Syria. The only way all this nonsense will end is for the Kurds to rise up and push back the land against both Saudi Arabia and Iran. Frankly, I would love for Egypt to be the center of power in the Middle East, considering that it is overall more sane and has shown a capacity to be secular, but it is a total mess right now. Maybe some sort of an Egypt-Turkey-Israel-Kurdistan alliance would finally end all this Shia-Sunni Iran-Arabia nonsense.

  • William_Bradford

    We’ll see what happens with the Turks, and the Kurds. The PPK has been engaged in Turkish cross-boarder terror attacks for some number of years. There will be no Kurdish independence without some sort of Turkish rapprochement.

  • http://www.teaparty.org/about-us/ Nixys

    Agreed. The Kurds are the key to the future of the Middle East. Iran, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, and Israel are all fairly coherent ideological and ethnic nation states. Turkey mostly is as well. The rest are just lines on a map that make no sense whatsover, mostly because of the Kurds. Syria and Iraq aren’t really nation states, they’re just land being fought over by Shia Muslims and Sunni Muslims funded by Iran and Saudi Arabia, in a quest for hegemony. Iran won hegemony in Iraq and Syria, so Saudi Arabia and Israel (and Egypt to a lesser extent) are now locked into a defacto alliance to take back Syria. The only way all this nonsense will end is for the Kurds to rise up and push back the land against both Saudi Arabia and Iran. Frankly, I would love for Egypt to be the center of power in the Middle East, considering that it is overall more sane and has shown a capacity to be secular, but it is a total mess right now. Maybe some sort of an Egypt-Turkey-Israel-Kurdistan alliance would finally end all this Shina-Sunni Iran-Arabia nonsense.

  • http://consciouseffectiveparenting.info/ Carol

    Can we stop sending Foreign Aid now?

  • http://consciouseffectiveparenting.info/ Carol

    Can we stop sending Foreign Aid now?

  • v

    I think Israel is on the right track in exploring new allies, as this administration is a rogue, corrupt and untrustworthy one that Israel cannot afford to have as a deceitful and fake friend. Israel is and will be able to defend its citizen and the country. Although Saudis do not look favorably upon Jews, they will, in order to serve their own interests, learn to love them and trust them. Who knows, maybe with Gulf nations support for Israeli policies towards their worst enemy, Iran, a strong alliance will develop and Israel will be better for it.

  • v

    I think Israel is on the right track in exploring new allies, as this administration is a rogue, corrupt and untrustworthy one that Israel cannot afford to have as a deceitful and fake friend. Israel is and will be able to defend its citizen and the country. Although Saudis do not look favorably upon Jews, they will, in order to serve their own interests, learn to love them and trust them. Who knows, maybe with Gulf nations support for Israeli policies towards their worst enemy, Iran, a strong alliance will develop and Israel will be better for it.

  • defcon 4

    Shrillery’s best friends are in the OIC, a group somewhat inimical to the continued existence of the state of Israel, and freedom everywhere.

  • defcon 4

    Huh? The official policy of Saudi Arabia is that Jews aren’t allowed in Saudi Arabia — a policy dictated by muhammad himself. Has everyone forgotten that only two years ago, Delta airlines agreed to vet passengers whose destination was Saudi Arabia to insure they weren’t Jewish? Saudi Arabia wanted to vet US soldiers fighting Saddam’s Iraq to insure none of them were Jewish (they were overruled). Similarly, when Governor Jerry Brown sent CalTRANS workers to assist Saudi Arabia, he turned down their request to, wait for it, insure none of the workers were Jewish.

    • teq

      Israel and Saudi Arabia make odd bedfellows, and don’t forget France which has climbed on board, but countries make alliances based on common interests or threats. They’re not going to be BFFs but if they have to work together they will. If FDR could climb in bed with Uncle Joe Stalin based on common threat, I don’t see why these three amigos should have a problem.

      • defcon 4

        Sure Saudi Arabia might ally w/Israel for this one cause, then stab Israel in the back after the mission is complete, which would make them heroes in the muslime world.

        • MukeNecca

          We should give the credit to Israel that she is not less aware of that reality than we are. Israel is not acting under the delusion that the threat of nuclear Iran will somehow transform Saudi from a nasty, backward, perfectly immoral foe to an enlightened, fair and humane partner for the future. Israel crawls to bed with saudis for a few nights only and for a particular limited reason – emergency. But she is not taking her clothes off.

          • BagLady

            When Obama gets in bed with the Saudis he’s a whore but When Israel does, she keeps her virginity. How quaint.

          • defcon 4

            There’s a difference between someone acting out of corrupt convenience and someone acting out of the desire to save his people from annihilation.

          • BagLady

            Isn’t Iran trying to save itself from annihilation?

          • defcon 4

            By threatening Israel w/obliteration? Your lies run thin Aihsa.

          • MukeNecca

            Obama is a whore whether or not he gets to bed with the Saudis. Now what principles does Israel betray to become a whore by collaborating with the Saudis on defense against their common enemy?

        • Hass

          That’s exactly what’s going to happen.

          • teq

            And I hope she will bring a 4th group to any three-way with the French and the Saudis, namely, the Trojans.

          • defcon 4

            And their horse right?

        • BagLady

          Or vice versa

    • BagLady

      and when my dear 18 year old daughter visited Israel she was held and questioned for 5 hours.

      • defcon 4

        Who cares islam0bitch? Are Jews allowed to go to Saudi Barbaria at all? What happens to anyone w/an Israeli passport traveling to most of the islam0nazi states of the Mid-East and N. Africa?

  • defcon 4

    Yes the islam0fascist Kurds are my heroes as well.

    • Will48

      exactly; the Kurds were the main perpetrators of the Armenian and – before and concurrent with it – the Assyrian Holocaust, in East Turkey (i.e. Occupied West Armenia) as well as norther Iraq, where the Kurds were attacking and decimating whole Christian Assyrian-populated towns. Whoever is losing between Shiites, Kurds, Sunnis, Persians, Tajiks, etc., we should help them fight on.

      • BagLady

        Absolutely. Let’s divide so that ‘they’ can conquer.

  • BagLady

    Congress thwarts him to the extent that outsiders wonder who is actually running things.

    • defcon 4

      “outsiders” being whom? The islam0nazis who bribe him? Or the islam0nazis within his own regime?

      • BagLady

        All those of us who sit on a mountain top watching the pathetic mind games being played between opponents of little talent.

        • defcon 4

          When it comes to mind games, you come to the contest unarmed Fatima.

          • BagLady

            I am indeed unarmed. I have managed to ‘rough it’ around the world for many years without recourse to arms. There have been dangerous times when I would have ‘reached for my weapon’ but, instead, had to reach for reasoning.

            Always quite fancied a zapper though.

      • BagLady

        No, people like me who wonder who these all powerful Congress members are and whether they aren’t being bought. And please don’t come with the pure as the driven snow, caring for America argument. These are very rich people with a personal agenda.

    • Notalibfool

      Congress thwarting Obama can only be a good thing. Common citizens (like me!) need someone to stand up for us against the regime.

  • Jeff Ludwig

    C. Glick is one of the greatest commentators on the Mideast there have ever been!

  • Will48

    a distinct possibility is simply that the USA/CIA decided to debase their own currency – by provoking a regional war – as a means of avoiding paying their mountain of debt owned by the Saudis. And that the Saudis will be one of the targets in this war is an added bonus for them. So they selected the est front man for the job, and installed him to the WH. The two whitey clowns opposite Barrack played their roles out and ran immaculately bad presidential campaigns, the both of them. This course was chosen in 2007 with acceptance of Hamilton/Baker Iraq Study Group report calling in the open for “reasonable regional aspirations of Iran to be accommodated”. Brzezinski formulated this as his Grand Vision for Stability Plan of four points: share global power with Britain/France/Germany as equals; engage BRIC; *accommodate* regional powers, namely Iran; and “*PACIFY Israel*”. “The Muslim world has awakened,” he said, “and either we engage with it, or go to war with it and kill millions – and we’re not prepared to do the latter”. Cheatham House speech, Nov. 2008. Obama executes this strategy set for him by his superiors. But he might also be playing for himself though, understanding the true consequences which the fools like Brzezinski don’t understand – namely, that this can lead to a Big War – hoping for the food riots, marshal law, and indefinite postponement of Constitution – and elections.

    • Drakken

      Well Untill we are prepared to kill as many hajis as possible, there is no accommodating the muslims no matter the stripe. Anyway you slice and dice it, it still ends up with us going to war, period.

  • Drakken

    The Kurds are key to being a nice wonderful pain in the azz to Iran, Iraq, Syria and Turkey, so you go Kurds! Let it rain! Let the Jihad go full tilt. Your going to have to pardon me as I go get a Bourbon and sit and watch with a huge smile on my face.

    • Hass

      Sounds good mate, have one for this bloke whilst you’re at it.

      • Drakken

        Cheers mate! I’ll get you to drink Gods nectar soon enough.

        • BagLady

          Do you number any Turks or Kurds amongst your friends?

  • Drakken

    Why try to end it? We should be encouraging these savages to go to town on each other, grab a cocktail and laugh as they maul each other in search of paradise. The more the savage muslims slaughter each other, the better it is for us infidels.

  • Drakken

    It won’t matter what the Turks have to say if the Kurds get their act together. As they organize amongst themselves, they will have strength in numbers and scare the Mohamed out of Iran, Iraq, Turkey and Iraq. We should be arming them up like the Russians in Iraq are doing. Watch as they burn baby burn.

    • Bert

      When the powers were assigning land for various ethnic groups in the Middle East they forgot the Kurds. I think that there are about 20 million Kurds in the region which are far more than the so-call ‘Palestinians’. If they come together they could become a serious force.

      • BagLady

        When they drew the lines in the sand they ignored everyone, not only the Kurds.

    • .

      The Russians are arming the Kurds in Iraq?

      News to me. I do not doubt you. Do you have a source?

      • Drakken

        I have a lot of Russians that work for us and they are telling me that ROBOEXPORT with FSB support, is arming the Kurds of Iraq to the teeth with all sorts of shinny new toys. That is why the Shiite govt in Bagdad can’t exert control over the Kurdish territories in the North. At this time I cannot give you other sources to use unfortunately. If there is a Kurdish poly group near you, it might be possible to find answers from them, but then again anything from them is unreliable and suspect.

    • William_Bradford

      The Turks have a 700k man military one of the largest anywhere, with modern equipment and well trained soldiers – each Turk is required to serve with a 15 month mandatory conscription. Bravado buy’s you only death in combat, Saddam who had a vastly inferior military relative to the Turks massacred the Kurds. Wishful thinking buys you only death.

  • Hass

    The Sunni whores will jump in bed with anyone if it mean striking a blow to their biggest enemy, the Shiites.

    • BagLady

      and vice versa I’m sure. T’was ever thus in tribal warfare.

      • defcon 4

        IN the 21st century Fatima, it’s only your fellow islam0nazis who are engaged in religious holy war.

        • BagLady

          Are you not jumping in bed with the Saudis for the time being because it suits your political cause?

          • defcon 4

            I’m not “jumping in bet” with anyone Fatima — not even under the auspices of an islamic holey Muta’h marriage.

  • Jason

    The collapse of Arab dictatorships is only a bad thing. Those dictatorships held back jihadists like a dam holds a river. As much as we all want to see democracy in the ME, it wont happen anytime soon. Obama, by stepping back, or even worse, supporting ‘Revolutionaries’, has burst that dam. It will only be a matter of time before we have another Iran and 2 more Saudi Arabias. The instability will allow jihadists to pilfer weapons from the governments, and start wars, as already seen all over the region. Once the dust settles, we’ll find that the ME will be a lot more hostile to the West than it once was.

    The Kurds in Syria is a good thing though. They have long been oppressed, and seem unlikely to ever wage jihad. Israel is right to make allies out of them, it will be a mutually beneficial relationship.

    • defcon 4

      I’ll cry for the kurds….not. It’s not like the kurds ever stood up for any of the unbelieving kaffir being murdered, persecuted and raped by their fellow islam0nazis. I’m not going to cry for the Kurds, because it would be a slap in the face to all the najjis kaffir of the world. The kurds like islam, let them eat it.

    • Drakken

      We should be encouraging the Kurds to go after both the arabs and Iranians and Turks, and sit back and watch the chaos that ensues, and we pick up the pieces that are left. A very simple plan of divide and conquer.

  • Anukem Jihadi

    Never let a crisis go to waste? We’ll see.
    Assuming the US ever really returns and that Iran is bluffing perhaps there are some silver linings here but I don’t see many.

  • Chris Behme

    Under the Obama administration, Israel is the enemy, and the mullahs are the allies. Obama is a Muslim.

    • Notalibfool

      Meanwhile the mullahs are laughing at the gullible one in the White House.

    • BagLady

      Duh. Is that your final year paper, Mr Behme? Simplistic in the extreme. Zero marks for you. Fail. Now go tell your parents.

      • Chris Behme

        Got something more than insipid word salad to make your incoherent point?
        Didn’t think so.
        Bag lady indeed.
        Double Obama voter for sure.

  • Drakken

    There will never ever be peace and democracy in the muslim world period, it is either ruled by a dictator or a mullah and they will always be at each others throat and they hate us infidels even worse than they hate themselves. So your thoughts on peace, unicorns and a COEXIST sticker on Prius is nothing more than wishful thinking and delusion.

    • BagLady

      There will never be peace anywhere if history is anything to go by. Find me a single day in the last century when there was world peace? (I believe there was one but I forget which day that was).

      • defcon 4

        All the genocide. terrorism and ethnic cleansing being carried out today, is being carried out in the name of islam.

        • BagLady

          In the name of Islam maybe but not always by the Islamists. Burmese Buddhists are doing a fair bit of ‘cleansing’.

          • defcon 4

            The actions of Burmese Buddhists are defensive — they’re trying to prevent what happened to Afghanistan’s Buddhists and what’s happening to Bangladesh’s Buddhists. Stick your baghead in a big bag of excrement Fatima.

  • ubuntuluser

    I lost all respect when Israel became Saudi’s ally.

    • defcon 4

      I’m sure you did Karim Jalali. After all, this just serves to show how perfidious the Jews and Sunnis are. Traitors all to the true Shi’a Islam.
      Isn’t it time for you to take a dive down that well and look for the 12th imam?

  • elixelx

    (Warning! this is written tongue-in-cheek! This is the first time I’ve ever used my tongue as a writing instrument!)

    If, and I mean IF this all takes place and Iran’s programme is de-fanged, de-clawed and spayed it will represent a huge, HUGE victory for Israel, which will have removed an existential threat without firing a shot…
    Once again an American President is doing what Bibi has ordered him to do…and of course the pusillanimous potus will take the credit, spike his balls, run around the outfield with a flag (any flag except the Stars and Bars!)draped across his shoulders but we here in Israel could care a fig.
    For us a strike on Iran (a la Osirak!) was always the ultimate we-have-nothing-to-lose option. Now the dupes of Europe and America have made it unnecessary.
    When the leaders of America, Europe, Russia, and China all agree that this is a good deal–beware, World! Hard-rain’s a-comin’!
    They’ve thrown us in Israel under the bus, but it will be the bus, NOT US, squealing soon enough!
    I expect Messrs Walt and Mearsheimer, and all who claim that the Jewish Lobby directs American Foreign Policy (and now the FP of all the other world Powers too!) to decry this agreement as a cowardly capitulation to Israel’s demands and to excoriate Barry-boy, the Israeli poodle, who even now is being wagged by his tail!
    Congratulations, Israel. We’ve brought the dogs to heel!

  • BagLady

    If Iran is your ‘worst enemy’ then you are very lucky my dears. I am counting your dead on my fingers.

    • defcon 4

      Would that be before or after your 5 time a day headbanging exercises?

  • BagLady

    So we’re talking borders. Throughout history these artificial lines, drawn for political advantage, have been the major cause of war. India, Pakistan and Bangladesh were separated with a stroke of Mountbatten’s pen which, to this day, causes strife.

    Do you remember when you could wonder the planet without the need of a visa? So long as you could afford the fare, you could go anywhere your heart desired. I think the nomadic Arab heart still so desires.

    I tried looking up the history of the visa, but all I got was a credit card facility. Cést la nouveau vie.

    • defcon 4

      THe only “strife” Aisha, is caused by muslimes killing, persecuting, raping and forcibly converting people of other faiths to islam in the India sub-continent — nice try at obfuscating that fact.

    • http://www.teaparty.org/about-us/ Nixys

      If you seriously believe that eliminating all borders would suddenly, truly, and finally bring about world peace, you are truly so much of a deluded moron that there is absolutely no hope in communicating with you. What happens when those “borders don’t matter” criminal gangs get a hold of France’s nukes? I suppose we have to get rid of all nukes, too.

      Why would eliminating borders suddenly make any problems that we have now go away? Yes, truly, that would absolutely not cause even more suffering to innocent people and be a delusional, cloying, pathetic, headache-inducingly idiotic idea.

      Lefties really don’t think practically, do they? Anyone who says “I know what’s causing hatred! Borders!” Should be forced to join the army.

      • BagLady

        There really is no need to shout. I was merely pointing out the fact that the world was a more peaceful place before governments saw the chance of making loadsa dosh from hastily erected borders and invented the visa. Before that one was free to wander without fear of being shot at because of one’s government’s foreign policies.

        It isn’t working, is it? Foreign policy. Blame who you like but the fact remains, the world is no longer my oyster.

        • http://www.teaparty.org/about-us/ Nixys

          Before that one was not free to wander without fear of being shot at because of belonging to the wrong tribe, which is no better.

  • BagLady

    To whom?

  • Rhaidon
  • BagLady

    and what is the philosophy of these Kurdish people you newly take in as friends? Will you make good bedfellows or are they to be just a convenience in the bigger picture?

  • http://www.libertariancomment.com/ Glenn

    So I keep coming here and there are no new articles. Could it be the Hasbara money has stopped flowing?