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Disability is the 11th Largest State in America

Posted By Daniel Greenfield On April 6, 2013 @ 11:31 pm In The Point | 3 Comments

One day our enlightened rulers will drop this silly system of geographical representation based on states and replace it with a system based on group membership. Every identity group will be able to vote for its own Congressmen based on its population size. And each group will also get two senators.

As the last election showed, identity group politics matter more than geography. Move an identity group into a state and the state turns blue regardless of the domestic interests of the natives.

It’s telling that the people on disability, if taken together, already form the 11th largest state in America; bigger than Kentucky, Kansas, Virginia, Massachusetts, Iowa and Indiana.  If Disability were a state, it would have 11 congressmen. And its numbers are approaching 10 percent of the non-government workforce.

While there are plenty of people legitimately on disability, the numbers have spiked due to dubious claims.

In 1960, only one-fifth of disability benefits went to those with “mood disorders” and “musculoskeletal” problems. In 2011, nearly half of those on disability voiced such complaints. In 2011, 15% of disability recipients were in their 30s or early 40s.

Many social workers report having people come in and demand disability while knowing how to scam the system.

The disability rates have risen sharply over the years. December 1968, 1,295,428 Americans collected disability. January 1997, 4,385,374 did.

In 1968 the population was at 200 million. In 1997 it was at 267 million. But disability rates increased faster than the population. And it has gone on increasing faster than the population.


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