Embassy Shutdown Ends with a Whimper as Embassies Reopen

Daniel Greenfield, a Shillman Journalism Fellow at the Freedom Center, is a New York writer focusing on radical Islam. He is completing a book on the international challenges America faces in the 21st century.


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I have to wonder what the point of the mass shutdowns was. We don’t seem to have encountered a major terrorist attack and indeed shutting down the embassies would have revealed our intelligence sources and scuttled any planned attack. In some ways that’s not a bad thing, but it just means that we’ll be less prepared for the next one.

So far the threat appears to have centered on Yemen. The Yemeni embassy is the only one staying closed. If so why the mass shutdown?

Eighteen of 19 of U.S. embassies and consulates across the Middle East, Asia and Africa closed recently will reopen on Sunday, State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki announced in a statement released Friday evening.

The U.S. embassy in Sanaa, Yemen, will remain closed, Psaki added, because of continuing concerns about a threat for potential terrorist attacks by al Qaeda.

The U.S. consulate in Lahore, Pakistan, which shut down yesterday do to a separate threat also will remain closed, Psaki announced in the statement.


The State Department announced on Sunday that it would extend closings already in place for a celebration at the end of Ramadan out of “an abundance of caution.”

It’s nice that the holidays of the Religion of Peace lead even their greatest appeasers in the diplomatic corps to exercise an overabundance of caution.