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Gitmo Inmate Searches Banned Because Groin Searches are “Abhorrent to Muslims”

Posted By Daniel Greenfield On July 20, 2013 @ 12:01 pm In The Point | 41 Comments

Things that aren’t abhorrent to Muslims include underwear bombs, smuggling weapons and stabbing guards. Also terrorizing a country to the extent that passengers are groped in airports.

There’s a pattern with rulings such as these. If the judge had determined that groin searches are a general civil liberties violation that would be one thing. But this is a special privilege and entitlement for Muslims.

A federal judge on Thursday ordered the military to stop touching the groins of detainees at the prison at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, when they are moved from their cells to speak with lawyers. The procedure had led some prisoners to stop meeting with or calling their lawyers.

In a 35-page opinion, Judge Royce C. Lamberth, the chief judge of the Federal District Court for the District of Columbia, called the searches — which included guards wedging their hands between the genitals and thighs of the detainees as many as four times when moving them to a meeting and back to their cells — “religiously and culturally abhorrent” to Muslims.

It would abhorrent to just about everyone. So why grant Muslims special privileges in this regard? Does having a recognized cultural and religious aversion to a universally abhorred procedure really provide special rights to be exempted from it?

Colonel Bogdan introduced the new procedures in May, after a raid in which guards forced protesting detainees into lockdown in their individual cells. After the raid, officials said they found improvised weapons.

But fortunately Americans don’t have a cultural or religious aversion to being murdered by terrorists.


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