Japan Goes Right, Dumps Emission Standards, Cuts Welfare Spending, Promotes Patriotism in Schools


This may not have been a good election year in the United States or Israel where the “idiot voter” trumped common sense and economic reason, but in Japan, one of the few First World countries with an older population that isn’t diluted by immigrants, the politics have turned to the right.

Japan has shown that it is willing to defend its territory against China, and with an economic implosion on the horizon, it is starting the unpleasant work of dismantling Japan’s ridiculously swollen and unsustainable welfare state. Many Americans may still think of Japan as the economic behemoth of the 80s, but Japan has long since become a debt-filled recession economy with even its biggest companies like Sony teetering on the edge of oblivion.

Japan’s debt to GDP ratio is the largest in the world. Its national debt is only second to the United States, even though it has less than half the population of the United States.

There’s big trouble in Japan now. And the cutting begins.

Welfare benefits will be slashed by ¥74 billion over a three-year period starting from fiscal 2013, after a government panel found that some people are making more on the dole than the average low-income person who is not spends on living costs, it was learned Sunday.

Welfare recipients hit a record high of 2.14 million in October 2012 and the state budget for benefits, including medical assistance, stood at around ¥2.8 trillion for fiscal 2012 ending in March.

Later Sunday, the government and ruling parties approved the fiscal 2013 budget proposal, with expenditures in the general account budget totaling ¥92.61 trillion. The Cabinet will sign off on the budget on Tuesday and send it to the Diet.

That’s around 30 billion in American dollars for the welfare payments and over a trillion for the budget. Slightly higher than the previous year’s budget. 46.3 percent of that budget is supposed to come from bond issues, but tax revenues will be slightly higher than bond issues for the first time in years.

The debt situation is bad enough that ¥22.2 trillion or 245 billion dollars will be used to service Japan’s national debt.

And Japan’s new conservative government is throwing emissions standards out the window.

Japan will drop its pledge to the global community to cut greenhouse gas emissions 25 percent by 2020 because of the country’s reduced future reliance on nuclear power, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe told a government panel Friday.

During a meeting of the panel, which is discussing economic revival measures, Abe stated that he will revise the energy strategy compiled by the previous administration of the Democratic Party of Japan, which aimed to completely phase out atomic energy by the 2030s.

Both sets of commitments are completely insane considering Japan’s lack of fossil fuels. There’s also a new priority on patriotism in education.

Japan’s stock market has improved, but Abe is still betting on borrowing for a stimulus plan and that may well prove to be a disastrous dead end for him, just as it did for Obama.

  • Mary Sue

    Japan turns normal? Will wonders never cease? Well I guess it shouldn't be a surprise, they've had long enough to learn from their leftist mistakes.

    • objectivefactsmatter

      "…they've had long enough to learn from their leftist mistakes."

      Those leftist mistakes were largely imposed on them by the West.

  • Ar'nun

    Does Japan even have a military to protect themselves from China? I thought part of the WWII treaty was that they were no longer allowed to have a military.

    • MKN36

      they always had an army, but weren't allowed to deploy outside of Japan. They currently have the 24th largest military with modern technology.

    • objectivefactsmatter

      "Does Japan even have a military to protect themselves from China? I thought part of the WWII treaty was that they were no longer allowed to have a military."

      Yes they do. They're hugely dependent on us by design but they have plenty of teeth. We're plugged in to their radar systems and communications to the extent that we feel the need to be, so they can't easily turn on us but they're strong enough to make any regional power show respect. Otherwise China would already have their flag extended even further.

      It might interest you to read about some of the details.

      google or search: japan self defense forces

    • objectivefactsmatter

      I forgot they were also scheduled to get the F35, if that tells you anything. Not a bad inventory for air power. Notice all are US suppliers. Plenty of F15s and I thought they also had some F16s as well but I can see why they'd want to avoid the more limited range of the smaller one. I'm sure ammunition is supplied by us too as needed, so they can not easily turn on us. Another Pearl Harbor would be their first and last battle of that war, I assure you.

      http://www.milaviapress.com/orbat/japan/index.php

      Japan Air Self-Defence Force

      2x Boeing 747-400 VIP transport
      25x C-1A heavy transport
      15x C-130H Hercules tactical transport
      1x C-X test flights
      15x CH-47J Chinook heavy-lift transport
      13x E-2C Hawkeye airborne early warning
      4x E-767 airborne command post
      1x EC-1 electronic warfare
      49x F-2A multi-role
      33x F-2B operational conversion
      91x F-4EJ Phantom air defence
      135x F-15J Eagle air defence
      45x F-15DJ Eagle operational conversion
      42x F-35A Lightning delivery date(s) unknown
      1x KC-130H Hercules air-to-air refueling
      4x KC-767 air-to-air refueling
      26x RF-4E Phantom reconnaissance
      208x T-4 advanced flying training
      48x T-7 basic flying training
      13x T-400 basic flying training
      5x U-4 VIP transport
      32x U-125A light transport
      32x UH-60J Blackhawk medium-lift transport
      " " +40 on order
      13x YS-11 light transport

      • objectivefactsmatter

        "Notice all are US suppliers."

        Actually some Japanese and others are making some of the replacements even when designations are changed. You have to look up each plane if you want the details, but even today virtually all of their effectiveness comes from US technology.

  • objectivefactsmatter

    "This may not have been a good election year in the United States or Israel where the “idiot voter” trumped common sense and economic reason, but in Japan, one of the few First World countries with an older population that isn’t diluted by immigrants, the politics have turned to the right."

    The communists never did well in Japan. The doves did OK when Uncle Sam was making it worthwhile..but they're not stupid in Japan.

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