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Saudi Arabia’s Clans of Terror

Posted By Daniel Greenfield On April 17, 2013 @ 10:17 am In The Point | 16 Comments

On his site, Walid Shoebat has an interesting discussion about the role of Saudi clans in supporting terrorism. While America is an individualistic society, the Muslim world is often tribal. Clan matters more than country.

Terrorism and crime by the Saudis is interlinked extensively within families, as we see in the Harbi clan. Let me explain. Americans will never find the Kaczynski Clan official website supporting Ted Kaczynski. Saudi Arabia is a far different story.

This is an important point. Americans often disregard basic structural differences between the east and the west. And that is a dangerous mistake.

The differences between the Muslim world and the Western world aren’t just religious. There are basic structural differences at the social level. They don’t think the way that we do, because they don’t live the way that we do. We think in terms of the country as defining us. They think in terms of the tribe as defining them. We sanction countries, but their countries are often a sham. It’s the clans that count.

After the bombings, a Saudi by the name of Abdul Rahman Ali Al-Harbi was hospitalized and became a ‘suspect’, then a ‘person of interest’. His apartment was searched by federal and local authorities. No confirmation has been given so far to his involvement. The Media were quick to claim his innocence, of course.

Perhaps a quick look at the Arabic sources should raise the eyebrows of every American relative to the extent of the problem at hand. Many from Al-Harbi’s clan are steeped in terrorism and are members of Al-Qaeda. Out of a list of 85 terrorists listed by the Saudi government shows several of Al-Harbi clan to have been active fighters in Al-Qaeda:

It’s not just Saudi Arabia. A closer look at the antics of the Al-Awlaki clan in Yemen (though the Saudis have a long history of using Yemen as their backyard) would have told us to watch out for Anwar Al-Awlaki. But that’s not the way we think. It is the way they think.

Take Khalid Aldawsari, a Saudi national. He is a student and an Al-Qaeda terrorist who planned to use weapons of mass destruction in the U.S., to include an attempted assassination of president Bush. Aldawsari was not a lone wolf; he was backed by an entire system. The wealthy and powerful Aldawsari clan, which includes the powerful Sheik Saud Bin Mut’ab who hosted a support group for the terrorist defending him publicly while funding his legal team.

Just translate “We are all Khalid Dawsari” into Arabic and see how much support the terrorist gets. The Aldawsari clan’s main website (alduwasser.net) keeps track of everything that goes with every comment in support for the terrorist linking to other supporting groups.

Take the Ghamdi clan (which has so many in the U.S.). It once responded to the following question that circulates the Middle East:

“Why does the Ghamdi clan produce so many terrorists?”

The Clan Ghamdi, on its official website (Ghamid.com), proudly responded to the question with a long martyrs list titled “Ghamdis the Mujahideen” priding themselves for having given two of their young men #3 Ahmed Ghamdi and #4 Hamza Saleh Ghamdi, who destroyed the South Tower in Manhattan on 9/11/01.

They are listed as “martyrs” and “heroes” with comments like “definitely, sons to be proud of”.

The parents of the Ghamdi’s who participated in 9/11 were proud of him. Countless Muslim websites describes them as “the lions of Manhattan. May Allah house them in paradise”.

Both Aldawsari clan as well as Ghamdi clan official websites openly supports terrorism. The support for Mohammad al-Wada’ani Aldawsari is in the open while firing machine guns:

All this raises an interesting question. Should we simply bar any Ghamdi from the United States? As Americans we don’t think this way, but in the tribal structure, a clan can be akin to a terrorist group. There are some American analogies, for example the Westboro Phelps family. But in the Middle East, this kind of structure is more common than not. And if clans like the Ghamdis openly support terrorism, then it may well be reasonable to bar any Ghamdi who doesn’t disavow his clan from entering the United States.


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