Turkey Accuses Egypt of Massacre, Egypt Responds by Endorsing Armenian Genocide Declaration

Daniel Greenfield, a Shillman Journalism Fellow at the Freedom Center, is a New York writer focusing on radical Islam. He is completing a book on the international challenges America faces in the 21st century.


TURKEY_-_occupy-gezi-protests-erdogan

Game set and match.

Turkey’s Islamist leader, Prime Minister Erdogan, threw another fit over the defeat of his fellow Islamists in Egypt, and disregarding his own brutal assaults on the Gezi Park protesters, demanded trials and intervention.

Erdogan also said Egypt’s leaders should stand a “fair and transparent” trial for what he called a “massacre” that unfolded live on televisions as police smashed two protest camps of supporters of the deposed Islamist president.

“Anyone or any international organization that remains silent and takes no action has the blood of those innocent children on their hands, just like those who carried out the coup.”

Speaking of the blood of innocent children on their hands, Erdogan is backing a murderous Islamist campaign against Syria. And there’s also that pesky Armenian genocide in his country’s political DNA.

So Egypt apparently decided to directly retaliate by hitting Turkey’s sore spot.

Al Bawaba News reported, from the Egyptian President Twitter account, that President Adli Mansour asked Egypt’s UN delegate to sign on the behalf of his Government on the Declaration of recognition of the Armenian Genocide at the United Nations. If such diplomatic move occurs it would be psychological equivalent of President Sadat visiting Israel in 1977.

“While this move is a political retaliation at Prime Minister Recep Erdogan’s aggressive stance against Egypt and in favor of the Ikhwan,” said an observer in Egypt, “this goes beyond the simple retaliation. It shows that the new leading team in Cairo is a group of secular, strategic and long term planning policy makers.

For them to sign on the Armenian Genocide Declaration means that they intend to wage an ideological war against the Islamists and the Jihadists in the region. This is not directed against Turks, particularly secular Turks, this is a strike against Erdogan’s Sultanate and in general terms against the notion of a political Caliphate as a rallying point of all Islamists in the region.”

I wouldn’t go quite that far myself. But, if true, it does remind Turkey that there is a price to pay and that Erdogan has been too loose in accusing other people of massacres.

  • jordanariel

    This is beautiful.

  • IC

    Funny how a news article couldn’t distinguish between a fake twitter account and a real one. SISI DOESNT HAVE A TWITTER ACCOUNT ITS FAKE :P Egyptians will cut the free trade agreements before they go to that extent. Another sad attempt of Armenians to troll Turkey

    • Dennis Civilian

      LMFAO!! shocker…..a fascist Turk blames an Armenian…….no way, it was the Israelis!!!!……no it was the Kurds!!!!!
      hey IC, I have a fairy tale for you…..there once was a Turk that took responsibility…….

      • A

        Pissoff!

      • IC

        Once upon a time a tool thought I was Turkish but I was really Canadian. :P

        • Dennis Civilian

          Nope. You have Canadian CITIZENSHIP, but you are ethnically a TURK and politically a FASCIST.

          • IC

            Who are you calling a Fascist? The person who speaks realities or the idiot who goes on the internet and label people?

          • Dennis Civilian

            Listen my Canadian friend Mehmet. LMFAO!! It’s 2013, you look like a moron. It would take a 10 year old 10min to find out the TRUTH on the Armenian Genocide, which is accepted by history scholars worldwide by a mountain of evidence.
            A FASCIST, yourself, argues AGAINST ALL THOSE FACTS.
            Everyone, we are going to educate Mehmet. Please start watching Ugur Ungor’s lectures on Youtube, he is of Turkish descent and is one of the worldwide experts on the Armenian Genocide as he has been into the Ottoman Archives many times and presents all his findings.
            Please let me know when you are done with Lesson#1 Mehmet.

          • IC

            I could also teach you a thing or two with my Masters in Business and bachelors in political Science. Odd that a person with slight intelligence would rather keep their name private instead of giving your full name Dennis Civilian?

          • Dennis Civilian

            ooooh Mehmet….impressive credentials. Prof Ungor is a PhD in History.
            Have you completed Lesson#1?

          • IC

            I am not argueing the genocide you thick headed bafoon, stick to hollywood Mr. Kardashian, debating is not your thing

          • Dennis Civilian

            Mr Kardashian….very original Mehmet.

          • IC

            Lol, I seriously am not Turkish, my comments are in the Middle East because that is what I specialized in for my Political Science degree. The Middle East as you know is very complicated and lots going on, therefore I find it interesting and follow what is going on. I tend to stay out of the politics in the places I reside. I hope this makes more sense

          • IC

            Ok, you never said you hated Turks, and I never denied the genocide…. Whats the problem again? Why did you attack my comments? Oh, thats right, you assumed I was Turkish and thought I would deny it?

          • Amerigy

            IC, for someone who claims to be an expert in the Middle East, you simply have no clue on it’s history, only the distorted version taught in Turkish schools.

          • IC

            You really think that I am Turkish because I have different views? And you misunderstood the invasion of cyprus, my point was that there was no genocide on greek cypriots and if that was the intention greece would have been effected also.

          • Lucia Moon

            IC, to be honest with you, I hope you are Turkish :)) I think if Armenians and Turks had more discussions such as we held together, we will settle our differences much sooner. An individual must not be threatened to express his/her opinion . This is the very foundation of democracy and advanced functioning. Even if we have contradicting opinions, even if we have different sources for the truth, there should always be a respect and tollerance. If some comments to you by other Armenians are harsh it is only because we have a lot of unprocessed pain that accumulates over years. Please look at it in that context :) It has been lovely debating with you :)

          • Amerigy

            IC, read the reports, look at Turkey’s own propaganda. They bombed entire villages and cities like Farmagusta with napalm. thousands of girls and women were rapped. over 5,000 innocent civilians were murdered by US supplied weapons. Read the press.

          • IC

            This was written by a Greek himself, to explain the hostility of Turks towards greeks, and he explains the involvement of Armenians in the systematic killings.
            “Unfortunately, our Greek ancestors didn’t exactly behave like angels. There are reports from independent, third-party sources that describe atrocities of the worst kind. For example:
            The American Lieutenant General James Harbord wrote, describing to the American Senate the first months of the occupation: “The Greek troops and the local Greeks who had joined them in arms started a general massacre of the Mussulmen population in which the officials and Ottoman officers and soldiers as well as the peaceful inhabitants were indiscriminately put to death.”
            A British officer reported (according to the historian Taner Akçam): “There was not even an organized resistance [by the Turks] at the time of the Greek occupation. Yet the Greeks are persisting in their oppression, and they have continued to burn villages, kill Turks and rape and kill women and young girls and throttle to death children.”
            Harold Armstrong, a British officer who was a member of the Inter-Allied Commission, reported that as the Greeks pushed out from Smynra, they massacred and raped civilians, and burned and pillaged as they went.
            The Inter-Allied commission stated in their report of May 23, 1921: “A distinct and regular method appears to have been followed in the destruction of villages, group by group, for the last two months, which destruction has even reached the neighbourhood of the Greek headquarters. The members of the Commission consider that, in the part of the kazas of Yalova and Gemlik occupied by the Greek army, there is a systematic plan of destruction of Turkish villages and extinction of the Muslim population. This plan is being carried out by Greek and Armenian bands, which appear to operate under Greek instructions and sometimes even with the assistance of detachments of regular troops.”
            But when the Turks started getting the upper hand in battles, mainly after Kemal Atatürk assumed the leadership of their army, the Greeks started retreating gradually from the lands they had occupied. By 1922 the Great Powers had changed their plans, and abandoned the Greeks in Anatolia, who now had not a good line of supplies, not even enough ammunition. They were fighting in a land they never considered theirs, whereas the Turks were fighting for what they considered their own land. That, and the fact that the Turks were getting ammunition from the newly formed Soviet Union (because Lenin naïvely thought of Atatürk as a revolutionary like him), made a big difference. The problem is, the Greeks didn’t just retreat nicely and kindly to return where they came from; they adopted the policy of leaving a scorched earth behind them. They burned villages, killed men, raped and killed women and children as they were heading back to Smyrna:
            Sydney Nettleton Fisher, a historian of the Middle East, wrote: “The Greek army in retreat pursued a burned-earth policy and committed every known outrage against defenceless Turkish villagers in its path”
            Norman M. Naimark noted: “The Greek retreat was even more devastating for the local population than the occupation.”
            James Loder Park, the U.S. Vice-Consul in Constantinople at the time, who toured much of the devastated area immediately after the Greek evacuation, described as follows what he saw: “Manisa… almost completely wiped out by fire… 10,300 houses, 15 mosques, 2 baths, 2,278 shops, 19 hotels, 26 villas…[destroyed]. Cassaba (Turgutlu) was a town of 40,000 souls, 3,000 of whom were non-Muslims. Of these 37,000 Turks only 6,000 could be accounted for among the living, while 1,000 Turks were known to have been shot or burned to death. Of the 2,000 buildings that constituted the city, only 200 remained standing. Ample testimony was available to the effect that the city was systematically destroyed by Greek soldiers, assisted by a number of Greek and Armenian civilians. Kerosene and gasoline were freely used to make the destruction more certain, rapid and complete. In Philadelphia (Alaşehir), hand pumps were used to soak the walls of the buildings with kerosene. As we examined the ruins of the city, we discovered a number of skulls and bones, charred and black, with remnants of hair and flesh clinging to them. Upon our insistence a number of graves having a fresh-made appearance were actually opened for us as we were fully satisfied that these bodies were not more than four weeks old.
            Arnold J. Toynbee, the British historian, reported that he and his wife witnessed atrocities perpetrated by Greeks in the Yalova, Gemlik, and Izmit areas. Not only did they obtain abundant material evidence in the shape of “burnt and plundered houses, recent corpses, and terror stricken survivors”, but also witnessed robbery by Greek civilians and arsons by Greek soldiers in uniform, caught in the act of perpetration.
            Marjorie Housepian wrote that 4,000 Smyrna Muslims were killed by Greek forces.
            Johannes Kolmodin, a Swedish orientalist in Smyrna, wrote in his letters that the Greek army had burned 250 Turkish villages.
            Of course I am aware of atrocities committed by Turks against Greeks (the civilians, not the army) after the Turks started getting the upper hand in that war. Of course I know about what we call “the Pontian genocide”. (Start by looking at the same link I gave above.) Perhaps the number of Greeks killed by Turks in the aftermath of that ugly war was even larger than the number of Turks killed by Greeks. But my purpose here is not to become a judge and determine which side committed more atrocities (who gave me that right?). My purpose is to explain to you, dear Greek compatriots, why Turks hate us.
            Committing an atrocity cannot be forgiven by pointing out that the enemy, too, committed atrocities against you. Two evil deeds do not cancel each other out making one innocence. This is the error Turks themselves make when they’re accused of the 1915 Armenian genocide. They say, “But Armenians killed us too!” and then they go and try to find out who killed the most people. Don’t make the same error.”

          • Lucia Moon

            Also, about Taner Akcam. :) Taner Anckam was witnessing to the Armenian Genocide in his writings, however later he changed his testimony in favor of Turks. This is a great exhample that Turks are trying to influence all: historians, politicians, military, etc… just to defend themselves and to give a reason why they did what they did. Those who know the truth and speak the truth, Turkish government, simply kills. That is what has happened to Hrant Dink, a Turkish journalist of Armenian descent , not so long ago. After his death hundreds of thousands of Noble Turks came out on the streets of Istambul with a sign on them saying ” I am Hrant Dink”. You see, my friend, the power of truth and love and light, is much stronger, than lies, deciet and evil. One is for certain, Turkish government is trying to use the old methods is shutting people up, and it is not working, because people are much more advanced now., such as you for exhample. A Canadian who is so informed about Armenian Genocide and the Turkish problem. The only thing you need is to dig deeper, to find out the real truth. You are on the right path, though, just stay away from Turkish historians or the corrupted historians who were paid to rewrite a history and sign their names underneath. Stay away from Armenian historians too, just to be fair. Look at the world maps from the museum of Britain, Look up Urartu, and the territory Armenia had.The interesting thing you said when you mentioned that Armenians came and Greeks came and massacred the Turks. Came where? Armenians had never moved from their historical land since prehistoric times. Turks came in from Asia and by force by blood killed, took over lands, destroyed architecture, etc… Then you are telling me that we had massacred them. If this is the case then, maybe we should define massacre? If you have lived in your house since brth, and someone comes and tells you that you have to leave or become a slave, and you rebell, will it be called a massacre? I am not sure…

          • IC

            To be honest man, we will never know for sure because we werent there, and Taner Akcam is only one of the facts I gave, but if we think the way of scholars being sell outs, then that is everywhere… Everyone has interests and views so it is pretty hard to be neutral. You are right also about the fact of Armenians residing in the country already. I have read about Armenians residing in constinopole / istanbul and more towards present day Armenia. I want you to keep in mind that the massacres on Turks does not discredit the fact of what the Turks did to Armenians or Greeks, however, violent/ systematic retaliation cannot and will not justify the reasons why Armenians/ Greeks did that to Turks, just as it doesn’t justify Turks of the wrongful acts they committed on Armenians and Greeks after. Things would be alot simpler if we stop debating on details on who killed more people or who destroyed what. If we can just acknowledge the wrong doings in general, apologize to each other and all move forward we can advance in society and sing kumbaya. I am hopeful that in this century people are more intelligent and rational so there will be no blood shed over relgions, racism, and hate. I understand your pains, and I understand the Greeks and the Turks, they all have their reasons, but it’s a matter of learning from it and not repeating it. If we look at history, it’s just a vicious cycle of afflicting violence on each other. Break the cycle. I wish I agree, I wish I was Turkish so I could have been a significant mediator to make both sides happy and respected. It is hard to find someone who hasn’t taken a harsh stance and there is still people who refuse to listen and stay ignorant.

            Cheers Brother

          • IC

            This was written by a Greek himself, to explain the hostility of Turks towards greeks, and he explains the involvement of Armenians in the systematic killings.
            “Unfortunately, our Greek ancestors didn’t exactly behave like angels. There are reports from independent, third-party sources that describe atrocities of the worst kind. For example:
            The American Lieutenant General James Harbord wrote, describing to the American Senate the first months of the occupation: “The Greek troops and the local Greeks who had joined them in arms started a general massacre of the Mussulmen population in which the officials and Ottoman officers and soldiers as well as the peaceful inhabitants were indiscriminately put to death.”
            A British officer reported (according to the historian Taner Akçam): “There was not even an organized resistance [by the Turks] at the time of the Greek occupation. Yet the Greeks are persisting in their oppression, and they have continued to burn villages, kill Turks and rape and kill women and young girls and throttle to death children.”
            Harold Armstrong, a British officer who was a member of the Inter-Allied Commission, reported that as the Greeks pushed out from Smynra, they massacred and raped civilians, and burned and pillaged as they went.
            The Inter-Allied commission stated in their report of May 23, 1921: “A distinct and regular method appears to have been followed in the destruction of villages, group by group, for the last two months, which destruction has even reached the neighbourhood of the Greek headquarters. The members of the Commission consider that, in the part of the kazas of Yalova and Gemlik occupied by the Greek army, there is a systematic plan of destruction of Turkish villages and extinction of the Muslim population. This plan is being carried out by Greek and Armenian bands, which appear to operate under Greek instructions and sometimes even with the assistance of detachments of regular troops.”
            But when the Turks started getting the upper hand in battles, mainly after Kemal Atatürk assumed the leadership of their army, the Greeks started retreating gradually from the lands they had occupied. By 1922 the Great Powers had changed their plans, and abandoned the Greeks in Anatolia, who now had not a good line of supplies, not even enough ammunition. They were fighting in a land they never considered theirs, whereas the Turks were fighting for what they considered their own land. That, and the fact that the Turks were getting ammunition from the newly formed Soviet Union (because Lenin naïvely thought of Atatürk as a revolutionary like him), made a big difference. The problem is, the Greeks didn’t just retreat nicely and kindly to return where they came from; they adopted the policy of leaving a scorched earth behind them. They burned villages, killed men, raped and killed women and children as they were heading back to Smyrna:
            Sydney Nettleton Fisher, a historian of the Middle East, wrote: “The Greek army in retreat pursued a burned-earth policy and committed every known outrage against defenceless Turkish villagers in its path”
            Norman M. Naimark noted: “The Greek retreat was even more devastating for the local population than the occupation.”
            James Loder Park, the U.S. Vice-Consul in Constantinople at the time, who toured much of the devastated area immediately after the Greek evacuation, described as follows what he saw: “Manisa… almost completely wiped out by fire… 10,300 houses, 15 mosques, 2 baths, 2,278 shops, 19 hotels, 26 villas…[destroyed]. Cassaba (Turgutlu) was a town of 40,000 souls, 3,000 of whom were non-Muslims. Of these 37,000 Turks only 6,000 could be accounted for among the living, while 1,000 Turks were known to have been shot or burned to death. Of the 2,000 buildings that constituted the city, only 200 remained standing. Ample testimony was available to the effect that the city was systematically destroyed by Greek soldiers, assisted by a number of Greek and Armenian civilians. Kerosene and gasoline were freely used to make the destruction more certain, rapid and complete. In Philadelphia (Alaşehir), hand pumps were used to soak the walls of the buildings with kerosene. As we examined the ruins of the city, we discovered a number of skulls and bones, charred and black, with remnants of hair and flesh clinging to them. Upon our insistence a number of graves having a fresh-made appearance were actually opened for us as we were fully satisfied that these bodies were not more than four weeks old.
            Arnold J. Toynbee, the British historian, reported that he and his wife witnessed atrocities perpetrated by Greeks in the Yalova, Gemlik, and Izmit areas. Not only did they obtain abundant material evidence in the shape of “burnt and plundered houses, recent corpses, and terror stricken survivors”, but also witnessed robbery by Greek civilians and arsons by Greek soldiers in uniform, caught in the act of perpetration.
            Marjorie Housepian wrote that 4,000 Smyrna Muslims were killed by Greek forces.
            Johannes Kolmodin, a Swedish orientalist in Smyrna, wrote in his letters that the Greek army had burned 250 Turkish villages.
            Of course I am aware of atrocities committed by Turks against Greeks (the civilians, not the army) after the Turks started getting the upper hand in that war. Of course I know about what we call “the Pontian genocide”. (Start by looking at the same link I gave above.) Perhaps the number of Greeks killed by Turks in the aftermath of that ugly war was even larger than the number of Turks killed by Greeks. But my purpose here is not to become a judge and determine which side committed more atrocities (who gave me that right?). My purpose is to explain to you, dear Greek compatriots, why Turks hate us.
            Committing an atrocity cannot be forgiven by pointing out that the enemy, too, committed atrocities against you. Two evil deeds do not cancel each other out making one innocence. This is the error Turks themselves make when they’re accused of the 1915 Armenian genocide. They say, “But Armenians killed us too!” and then they go and try to find out who killed the most people. Don’t make the same error.”

          • Amerigy

            IC you are a Turk trying to justify and rationalize the overwhelming evidence of Turkish atrocities over the years. Why do you even think I am a Greek? Anyone that questions the Turkish distortions of history is a Greek to you.

          • IC

            I didn’t know you were greek, I don’t understand why people on this site try to label everyone, not once have I ever labelled someone because of their views… but why do you have a hard time trying to understand where i am coming from? The point of this wasn’t to say Turks got massacred too so its ok, what I am saying is you and all your neighbours have faced adversities, trying to compare which one is worse doesn’t do justice, and ignoring the other side and trying to advertise your own misfortunes will not bring peace or awknowledgement by the other side. Your Greek brother made a very neutral approach, he also talked about why GREEKS have a grudge against Turks so its not one sided don’t worry.

          • IC

            I wait for the Historian debate, just like how scholarly articles are peer reviewed, the debate would represent this “peer review.” A man who criticises for their intelligence should know this right? I’ll stick to my assumption of nothing. Where I cannot accept or deny a genocide without it being debated and settled for good. Until then Mr. Bible sales man, i’m afraid im going to have to pass on your politcal ambitions.

          • IC

            On a serious note, why are you so quiet now? Is it the fact that you exposed your racism towards Turks for nothing? How funny. Here you are trying to push your very unfortunate story on people of a so claimed genocidal act that is typically fueled by hate and racism.. yet you go off trying to tell this story using your hate towards a race.. now that is a very good indicator of wanting to commit genocidal acts from this hatred. Does this mean you support genocides since you’re so racist to Turks? Did you not learn anything from your ancestors fates? Acting on Hate and violence brings even more Hate and Violence back. If MAYBE, just Maybe, you stop your anger and rage towards Turks, maybe they will listen to you. Why would I want to support you and your cause when people like you only want revenge and want to keep the cycle of Genocidal acts going?

            That is not what I support. I support Truth and Peace.

            In other words, change your approach you’re discrediting yourself.

            Gotta find that Power for love rather than the love for power my friend.

            Regards

          • Dennis Civilian

            Maaaan….you really are SCUM.
            Never will you see me write that I hate Turks.
            There are good and bad in every race.
            But I HATE YOUR GOVERNMENT and I HATE FASCIST TURKS much like yourself.
            But there are many Armenians which hate Turks, and I don’t blame them for it. Having to deal with scum like you brings out hatred in human nature.

          • Dennis Civilian

            “Did you not learn anything from your ancestors fates?”
            -What fate? The Armenian Genocide that “might have occurred”. Yes. I learned that there are barbarians on this Earth masking as human beings, and even lower than that, there are scum like you that will lie to protect them.

          • IC

            Yes, and right now what I see is the over exploitation of the mass murder of your ancestors, don’t you feel guilty the slightest bit? Look at the title of this article, they died in vein to be used as a political tool? It should be used to keep your ethnic identity alive and unite with your brothers and sisters. I apologize if my initial comment offended you, I could see how it could be misunderstood. I just wish you approached it in a more conservative fashion instead of calling me Fascist.

          • IC

            Yes and I don’t support the Turkish government either, I thought they would get it together after the protests but it seems to be getting worse.

          • Dennis Civilian

            “I support Truth and Peace. ”
            -LMFAO!!!! LIAR. You don’t support the TRUTH. There are amazing Turks like Ugur Ungor, Taner Akcam, & Hasan Cemal that support TRUTH. You support lies!!
            Much like your I’M CANADIAN statement……and yet when 1 clicks on your ID all they see is comments in line with Turkish propaganda…..not a single comment on a CANADA piece.

          • Lucia Moon

            Hello , IC :) quite a heated conversation you had with Mr. Civilian, even got my attention . I am a graduate student in psychology, therefore I have a very specific approach to the whole Genocide subject. I am Armenian and the pain of Armenian genocide as well as the hatred for those who inflicted the genocide on my great nation is passed on to me from day one, the same as the denial is passed on from a Turk to a Turk . I have all rights in the world to be angry, lets be fair, however I also have a responsibility. Being an Armenian is a responsibility, because we are the first Christian country, therefore have to live according to Christian values. That is a dilemma! To have Christian values in a Muslim world! That is why Armenians were massacred in Turkey. You are right that we have to learn from our ancestors . What I have learned is that I will never forget the genocide, I will fight for it recognition, however I choose not to hate the Turks, even if some of them don’t accept it. There are many Noble Turks, that have recognized the Genocide .Armenians have relied a lot on common sense and High morals in their expectations for Turkey to recognize Genocide, however it is not possible or even fair to expect that from a country that was and is still supporting a believe that it is O’K to kill a person who doesn’t share the same believe and seize their properties and wealth.

          • IC

            I will not deny the Armenian genocide, but we cannot deny the other part of history where Turks got slaughtered by Greeks and aided by Armenians when they were the most vulnerable since the empire was fighting a war on all fronts. Two wrongs don’t make a right, Turks cannot use that as a justification for their actions to not recognize the Genocide, but if Armenians or Greeks cannot recognize the slaughter of Turks, then to me this is just a politically motivated interests.

          • IC

            This was written by a Greek himself, to explain the hostility of Turks towards greeks, and he explains the involvement of Armenians in the systematic killings.

            “Unfortunately, our Greek ancestors didn’t exactly behave like angels. There are reports from independent, third-party sources that describe atrocities of the worst kind. For example:

            The American Lieutenant General James Harbord wrote, describing to the American Senate the first months of the occupation: “The Greek troops and the local Greeks who had joined them in arms started a general massacre of the Mussulmen population in which the officials and Ottoman officers and soldiers as well as the peaceful inhabitants were indiscriminately put to death.”

            A British officer reported (according to the historian Taner Akçam): “There was not even an organized resistance [by the Turks] at the time of the Greek occupation. Yet the Greeks are persisting in their oppression, and they have continued to burn villages, kill Turks and rape and kill women and young girls and throttle to death children.”

            Harold Armstrong, a British officer who was a member of the Inter-Allied Commission, reported that as the Greeks pushed out from Smynra, they massacred and raped civilians, and burned and pillaged as they went.

            Arnold J. Toynbee, the British historian, reported that he and his wife witnessed atrocities perpetrated by Greeks in the Yalova, Gemlik, and Izmit areas. Not only did they obtain abundant material evidence in the shape of “burnt and plundered houses, recent corpses, and terror stricken survivors”, but also witnessed robbery by Greek civilians and arsons by Greek soldiers in uniform, caught in the act of perpetration.

            Marjorie Housepian wrote that 4,000 Smyrna Muslims were killed by Greek forces.

            Johannes Kolmodin, a Swedish orientalist in Smyrna, wrote in his letters that the Greek army had burned 250 Turkish villages.

            The Inter-Allied commission stated in their report of May 23, 1921: “A distinct and regular method appears to have been followed in the destruction of villages, group by group, for the last two months, which destruction has even reached the neighbourhood of the Greek headquarters. The members of the Commission consider that, in the part of the kazas of Yalova and Gemlik occupied by the Greek army, there is a systematic plan of destruction of Turkish villages and extinction of the Muslim population. This plan is being carried out by Greek and Armenian bands, which appear to operate under Greek instructions and sometimes even with the assistance of detachments of regular troops.”

            But when the Turks started getting the upper hand in battles, mainly after Kemal Atatürk assumed the leadership of their army, the Greeks started retreating gradually from the lands they had occupied. By 1922 the Great Powers had changed their plans, and abandoned the Greeks in Anatolia, who now had not a good line of supplies, not even enough ammunition. They were fighting in a land they never considered theirs, whereas the Turks were fighting for what they considered their own land. That, and the fact that the Turks were getting ammunition from the newly formed Soviet Union (because Lenin naïvely thought of Atatürk as a revolutionary like him), made a big difference. The problem is, the Greeks didn’t just retreat nicely and kindly to return where they came from; they adopted the policy of leaving a scorched earth behind them. They burned villages, killed men, raped and killed women and children as they were heading back to Smyrna:

            Sydney Nettleton Fisher, a historian of the Middle East, wrote: “The Greek army in retreat pursued a burned-earth policy and committed every known outrage against defenceless Turkish villagers in its path”

            Norman M. Naimark noted: “The Greek retreat was even more devastating for the local population than the occupation.”

            James Loder Park, the U.S. Vice-Consul in Constantinople at the time, who toured much of the devastated area immediately after the Greek evacuation, described as follows what he saw: “Manisa… almost completely wiped out by fire… 10,300 houses, 15 mosques, 2 baths, 2,278 shops, 19 hotels, 26 villas…[destroyed]. Cassaba (Turgutlu) was a town of 40,000 souls, 3,000 of whom were non-Muslims. Of these 37,000 Turks only 6,000 could be accounted for among the living, while 1,000 Turks were known to have been shot or burned to death. Of the 2,000 buildings that constituted the city, only 200 remained standing. Ample testimony was available to the effect that the city was systematically destroyed by Greek soldiers, assisted by a number of Greek and Armenian civilians. Kerosene and gasoline were freely used to make the destruction more certain, rapid and complete. In Philadelphia (Alaşehir), hand pumps were used to soak the walls of the buildings with kerosene. As we examined the ruins of the city, we discovered a number of skulls and bones, charred and black, with remnants of hair and flesh clinging to them. Upon our insistence a number of graves having a fresh-made appearance were actually opened for us as we were fully satisfied that these bodies were not more than four weeks old. [the time of the Greek retreat through Philadelphia]”

          • IC

            “Park concluded as follows:

            “The destruction of the interior cities visited by our party was carried out by Greeks.

            “The percentages of buildings destroyed in each of the last four cities referred to were: Manisa 90 percent, Cassaba (Turgutlu) 90 percent, Philadelphia (Alaşehir) 70 percent, Salihli 65 percent.

            “The burning of these cities was not desultory, nor intermittent, nor accidental, but well planned and thoroughly organized.

            “There were many instances of physical violence, most of which was deliberate and wanton. Without complete figures, which were impossible to obtain, it may safely be surmised that atrocities committed by retiring Greeks numbered well into thousands in the four cities under consideration. These consisted of all three of the usual type of such atrocities, namely murder, torture and rape.”

            Those are just a few of the reports of atrocities committed by our ancestors against Turks. You can find them all in this Wikipedia page, which is a good starting point. And since you are so good in heroic cyber-battles, my brave young Greek cyber-warriors, you may go and dig up more information from the Internet, which is all available at your fingertips. Learn first, reserve judgment for later.

            Of course I am aware of atrocities committed by Turks against Greeks (the civilians, not the army) after the Turks started getting the upper hand in that war. Of course I know about what we call “the Pontian genocide”. (Start by looking at the same link I gave above.) Perhaps the number of Greeks killed by Turks in the aftermath of that ugly war was even larger than the number of Turks killed by Greeks. But my purpose here is not to become a judge and determine which side committed more atrocities (who gave me that right?). My purpose is to explain to you, dear Greek compatriots, why Turks hate us.

            Committing an atrocity cannot be forgiven by pointing out that the enemy, too, committed atrocities against you. Two evil deeds do not cancel each other out making one innocence. This is the error Turks themselves make when they’re accused of the 1915 Armenian genocide. They say, “But Armenians killed us too!” and then they go and try to find out who killed the most people. Don’t make the same error.”

          • IC

            “Of course I am aware of atrocities committed by Turks against Greeks (the civilians, not the army) after the Turks started getting the upper hand in that war. Of course I know about what we call “the Pontian genocide”. (Start by looking at the same link I gave above.) Perhaps the number of Greeks killed by Turks in the aftermath of that ugly war was even larger than the number of Turks killed by Greeks. But my purpose here is not to become a judge and determine which side committed more atrocities (who gave me that right?). My purpose is to explain to you, dear Greek compatriots, why Turks hate us.
            Committing an atrocity cannot be forgiven by pointing out that the enemy, too, committed atrocities against you. Two evil deeds do not cancel each other out making one innocence. This is the error Turks themselves make when they’re accused of the 1915 Armenian genocide. They say, “But Armenians killed us too!” and then they go and try to find out who killed the most people. Don’t make the same error.”

          • IC

            I will not deny the Armenian genocide, but we cannot deny the other part of history where Turks got slaughtered by Greeks and aided by Armenians when they were the most vulnerable since the empire was fighting a war on all fronts. Two wrongs don’t make a right, Turks cannot use that as a justification for their actions to not recognize the Genocide, but if Armenians or Greeks cannot recognize the slaughter of Turks, then to me this is just a politically motivated interests. If you just spend the time to atleast hear the other side of history, which isn’t Turkish history or not even written by a Turk themselves, but actually a Greek, you can atleast understand where the Turks come from and their discontent of this whole situation.

          • Lucia Moon

            If Turks thought that Armenians were the threat, they could have quickly arrest those Armenian activists who cold have been the threat. I would somehow understand that this was made to protect their country. The attempt to eliminate the entire Armenian race does not fit in my head.. Does it fit in yours? Instead of saving their country they had put a shame on it and now their poor children are not able to wash the blood off their own hands, because it is still reappearing with every Turkish generation until the Genocide is recognized . This crime against humanity is in the DNA of Turks, and the only way is through repentance and recognition. I don’t care how much Turkey will pay to Armenia, whatever it is, it will not be enough to cover the life of that one innocent child raped and killed at the desert of Deir-ez Zor. All i care about is for two nations to face the reality, take the responsibility, and go through the healing in order to start giving birth to a healthy generation of Armenians and Turks

          • IC

            This was written by a Greek himself, to explain the hostility of Turks towards greeks, and he explains the involvement of Armenians in the systematic killings.
            “Unfortunately, our Greek ancestors didn’t exactly behave like angels. There are reports from independent, third-party sources that describe atrocities of the worst kind. For example:
            The American Lieutenant General James Harbord wrote, describing to the American Senate the first months of the occupation: “The Greek troops and the local Greeks who had joined them in arms started a general massacre of the Mussulmen population in which the officials and Ottoman officers and soldiers as well as the peaceful inhabitants were indiscriminately put to death.”
            A British officer reported (according to the historian Taner Akçam): “There was not even an organized resistance [by the Turks] at the time of the Greek occupation. Yet the Greeks are persisting in their oppression, and they have continued to burn villages, kill Turks and rape and kill women and young girls and throttle to death children.”
            Harold Armstrong, a British officer who was a member of the Inter-Allied Commission, reported that as the Greeks pushed out from Smynra, they massacred and raped civilians, and burned and pillaged as they went.
            The Inter-Allied commission stated in their report of May 23, 1921: “A distinct and regular method appears to have been followed in the destruction of villages, group by group, for the last two months, which destruction has even reached the neighbourhood of the Greek headquarters. The members of the Commission consider that, in the part of the kazas of Yalova and Gemlik occupied by the Greek army, there is a systematic plan of destruction of Turkish villages and extinction of the Muslim population. This plan is being carried out by Greek and Armenian bands, which appear to operate under Greek instructions and sometimes even with the assistance of detachments of regular troops.”
            But when the Turks started getting the upper hand in battles, mainly after Kemal Atatürk assumed the leadership of their army, the Greeks started retreating gradually from the lands they had occupied. By 1922 the Great Powers had changed their plans, and abandoned the Greeks in Anatolia, who now had not a good line of supplies, not even enough ammunition. They were fighting in a land they never considered theirs, whereas the Turks were fighting for what they considered their own land. That, and the fact that the Turks were getting ammunition from the newly formed Soviet Union (because Lenin naïvely thought of Atatürk as a revolutionary like him), made a big difference. The problem is, the Greeks didn’t just retreat nicely and kindly to return where they came from; they adopted the policy of leaving a scorched earth behind them. They burned villages, killed men, raped and killed women and children as they were heading back to Smyrna:
            Sydney Nettleton Fisher, a historian of the Middle East, wrote: “The Greek army in retreat pursued a burned-earth policy and committed every known outrage against defenceless Turkish villagers in its path”
            Norman M. Naimark noted: “The Greek retreat was even more devastating for the local population than the occupation.”
            James Loder Park, the U.S. Vice-Consul in Constantinople at the time, who toured much of the devastated area immediately after the Greek evacuation, described as follows what he saw: “Manisa… almost completely wiped out by fire… 10,300 houses, 15 mosques, 2 baths, 2,278 shops, 19 hotels, 26 villas…[destroyed]. Cassaba (Turgutlu) was a town of 40,000 souls, 3,000 of whom were non-Muslims. Of these 37,000 Turks only 6,000 could be accounted for among the living, while 1,000 Turks were known to have been shot or burned to death. Of the 2,000 buildings that constituted the city, only 200 remained standing. Ample testimony was available to the effect that the city was systematically destroyed by Greek soldiers, assisted by a number of Greek and Armenian civilians. Kerosene and gasoline were freely used to make the destruction more certain, rapid and complete. In Philadelphia (Alaşehir), hand pumps were used to soak the walls of the buildings with kerosene. As we examined the ruins of the city, we discovered a number of skulls and bones, charred and black, with remnants of hair and flesh clinging to them. Upon our insistence a number of graves having a fresh-made appearance were actually opened for us as we were fully satisfied that these bodies were not more than four weeks old.
            Arnold J. Toynbee, the British historian, reported that he and his wife witnessed atrocities perpetrated by Greeks in the Yalova, Gemlik, and Izmit areas. Not only did they obtain abundant material evidence in the shape of “burnt and plundered houses, recent corpses, and terror stricken survivors”, but also witnessed robbery by Greek civilians and arsons by Greek soldiers in uniform, caught in the act of perpetration.
            Marjorie Housepian wrote that 4,000 Smyrna Muslims were killed by Greek forces.
            Johannes Kolmodin, a Swedish orientalist in Smyrna, wrote in his letters that the Greek army had burned 250 Turkish villages.
            Of course I am aware of atrocities committed by Turks against Greeks (the civilians, not the army) after the Turks started getting the upper hand in that war. Of course I know about what we call “the Pontian genocide”. (Start by looking at the same link I gave above.) Perhaps the number of Greeks killed by Turks in the aftermath of that ugly war was even larger than the number of Turks killed by Greeks. But my purpose here is not to become a judge and determine which side committed more atrocities (who gave me that right?). My purpose is to explain to you, dear Greek compatriots, why Turks hate us.
            Committing an atrocity cannot be forgiven by pointing out that the enemy, too, committed atrocities against you. Two evil deeds do not cancel each other out making one innocence. This is the error Turks themselves make when they’re accused of the 1915 Armenian genocide. They say, “But Armenians killed us too!” and then they go and try to find out who killed the most people. Don’t make the same error.”

          • IC

            I will not deny the Armenian genocide, but we cannot deny the other part of history where Turks got slaughtered by Greeks and aided by Armenians when they were the most vulnerable since the empire was fighting a war on all fronts. Two wrongs don’t make a right, Turks cannot use that as a justification for their actions to not recognize the Genocide, but if Armenians or Greeks cannot recognize the slaughter of Turks, then to me this is just a politically motivated interests. If you just spend the time to atleast hear the other side of history, which isn’t Turkish history or not even written by a Turk themselves, but actually a Greek, you can atleast understand where the Turks come from and their discontent of this whole situation.

          • Lucia Moon

            I see your point. Thank you for not denying the Armenian Genocide as well. That is wise, because the proves for the genocide come mainly from not Armenian sources. It will not be wise from me to deny the fact that Armenian wanted Russians to free them from Turks . Now commenting on how Armenians were rebelling and hurting Turks at the very vulnerable time for them … Armenians were always pressured by Turks . The genocide of 1915 is not the first massacre. What about Armenian massacres in 1894-1896 carried our during Abdul Hamid II ? There was no vulnerable, sensitive time for Turkey. In fact it was a very peaceful time, however Armenians were the Christian minority that refused to convert . Turks were burning villages, raping and kidnaping beautiful Armenian women into their harems, killing men, enforsing unbearable taxation, etc… Abdul hamid’s mother , herself was an Armenian girl kidnaped, brought to the harem and converted by force. Do you understand why Armenians were hopping for Russians to come and free them ?

          • IC

            I will not deny those facts either, as there is evidence of inequality to other minorities under Ottoman rule, which have cursed Turks dearly in History, as half of Europeans and other regions being discontent of Turks for that reason (historically). It is a shame because even in their own religion it promotes the freedom of beliefs (as their book embraces the Torah and Gospel also) as long as their beliefs isn’t under attack. Which to my knowledge wasn’t the case. (correct me if im wrong) Regardless, any kind of rape or murder of women and children are disgusting to any group/race. Now that we have proved numerous genocidal acts inflicted on all parties, Armenian, Pontiac (greek), and Turkish (which has been surprisingly remained hidden in history books.) This shows to you that Violence, hate, and anger does not end genocides, does not end killings, or conflict, it comes back even worse and more severe. Therefore we must condemn any hatred or violence if we want any positive impact to come from these unfortunate events, which is the goal right?
            I hope the rest of the masses can come to an agreement and respect for each other just as me and Lucia have. As Civilian said, this is 2013, its time to stop debating about something 100 years ago and come to a recognition of all losses coming from different identities. It doesn’t matter how many people killed who or how much more brutal this genocide was than the other one. If we can embrace and accept all sides, I would HOPE that we can FORGIVE but not FORGET.

            Thank you Lucia for being civil with me.
            Cheers

          • IC

            Who’s the fascist? tell me? Did I call you Armenian because you are so anti-Turkish? No. On the other hand, I merely state that it was sad that a news website could not distinguish that SISI doesn’t have a twitter account for him to state on Twitter that he is endorsing the Genocide. But guess what you ASSUMED I was Turkish, and when you looked like an idiot, you then tried to claim that I was ethnically Turkish but guess what I am not either and my buddy here Mr. kardashian thinks that I am denying the Genocide like I was there to see it :p Stop being so defensive and ive heard enough of your spam, acting like a moron won’t help the cause for your people. After this, I can say like the Turks say it, leave it to the historians to debate, which seems increasingly odd that it hasn’t yet after almost 100 years….

          • CI

            its not a debate. or up to debate. this is what turkey has been most successful is making people think there is a debate. there is no debate. and armenians shouldnt fall into the trap of people telling them historians are needed.

          • IC

            But why refuse to do it? Shut them up for good, If this is true. It shouldn’t be a problem right? If you guys agree to it you end all debates about whether its true or not and no one can say sh*t at that point, you know what I mean?

      • IC

        Wrong once again. But then again you would think first to consider it. & how did you find the connection that the diplomatic clown show representing the average turkish citizen? Ahmedinejad was a clown too… does that mean persians are all clowns?

    • http://www.iranaware.com/ American Infidels

      yawn..

    • Steven

      Another sad attempt of a stupid, ignorant Turk blaming all of his problems on others…

      • IC

        Why Do you think im Turkish? Because I broke the truth to you pigs ? Look at the pathetic reactions. How sad. Canada FTW

        • Dennis Civilian

          You have Canadian CITIZENSHIP, but you are ethnically a TURK and politically a FASCIST.

          • IC

            Labelling won’t take away the fact that you’re butt hurt and a liar.

          • Dennis Civilian

            Funny comment from someone that is mature and believes in Peace and Love. You are a charlatan. Absolute SCUM.

          • IC

            I’ve looked at your comments too and alot of talking before thinking going on

  • UCSPanther

    BURN!!!

  • LindaRivera

    I’m extremely happy that the highly popular Egyptian military who intervened to save Egypt’s innocents are a moral and ethical people. The Egyptian military did what any military should do to save their country from great evil.

  • Attila_the_hun

    This little rift between Islamist vs Nationalist Muslims once again proves that the cause of instability in The Middle east has nothing to do with Israel/Palestinian dispute, rather Islam itself. Unfortunately The west specially The USA is unable to come to gribs with reality. Always is easy to blame The Jews for all the worlds problems. Until Islam goes trough reformation we are going to see a lot more death bodies.
    The reaction of Erdoğan is much more directed to for domestic consumption rather than Egypt’s generals. Deep in his hart he knows Turkey will not be able to escape the Arable spring unscathed.
    Sooner rather than latter Syrian civil war will spill over into Turkey.
    Is any wonder why he is desperately trying to make peace with The Kurds?

  • Gee

    Not only the Armenian genocide, but also the on going Kurdish genocide, ethnic cleansing of Cypriots.

    Turkey is blaming everybody for all the actions that they are committing

  • Ara

    It is a sad state of affairs when the memory of the suffering and deaths of the victims of a genocidal campaign is being used merely as a cynical political tool among nations.

    • Astrid Z. Kev

      True and very, very true!

    • alfred nasr

      No sir, the moral basis was always there, when i was at school in Egypt, studying History, we studied the crimes of the Ottoman Empire(Sultanate), the political decision was taken according to political calculations, that’s true, not out of anger, hatred, or childish reaction. And finally, we have the chance to say it loud, if the decision was really taken, that the majority of Egyptians had always the moral basis.

  • Nune

    Armenian Genocide recognition (full and frank) should have come a long time ago and without any political motivations, but we Armenians will take it.

    Egypt, you are welcome for the thousands and thousands of years of Armenian contributions to your society (including Nefertiti– yes, Armenian, and Nubar Pasha). It’s really embarrassing that it took Egypt this long to recognize the Armenian Genocide for plain moral reasons, but again, we’ll take it. It’s progress.

    Congratulations from Armenia.

  • D

    Catering for the Jewish & Christian masses. Boring!

    • Dennis Civilian

      would you feel more at home if we invited a suicide bomber?

  • John

    Turkey ‘guilty of ethnic cleansing of Cypriots,’ Gee? I think we need a little documentation there. If you’re talking about 1974, that occupation was in reaction to an Athens-inspired coup, as Makarios himself told the United Nations, and in defence of Turkish Cypriots who had been ghettoised and killed since the 1950s.

    • Amerigy

      the illegal Turk invasion and continued illegal occupation of Cyprus is a crime which continues to this day. The TC community has been used as a pawn and used as an excuse for the ethnic cleansing and murder of over 5000 innocent civilians. If Turkey is truly concerned for the TCs, why then are the TCs oppressed in that area and most of them leave? More Turkish propaganda.

      • IC

        If they wanted to get rid of ethnic Greeks, There would be no Greece. Get over it and face facts. Your people are just as equal as theirs

        • Amerigy

          IC, you make no sense at all. What are you talking about? We are talking about the illegal invasion of Cyprus, not Greece. You are the one who should have your facts straight.

    • Amerigy

      The Turkish Cypriots were not forced to be “ghettoisied” by Markarios, they were told to move into these areas by their own leaders, namely , Rauf Denktash.

  • Sofia

    recognizing Armenian Genocide has become a matter of a trade… which is really pity… and who let’s Daniel Greenfield decide “I wouldn’t go quite that far myself”… are you God? or maybe because it was 100 years ago you would like to forget it? or maybe you’d prefer forgetting it because it was not on your land?
    Generally, I am really sorry every time someone wants to punch Turkey, they raise the issue of Armenian Genocide… had the world recognized it on time, Hitler would not utter the words ‘who remembers the atrocities with Armenians to remember the one with Jews?’ The feature of forgetting is the weak point in human beings…

    • alfred nasr

      I am not in the military or the MB in Egypt, i am an ordinary man who can get shot by the the MB just for the crime of refusing terrorism. [Armenian Genocide has become a matter of a trade...] yes, but between whom?, governments or peoples?, there are people in Egypt, who said NO.

  • Albert

    Not only the the Armenian Genocide happened.
    Also in that year of 1915 the Assyrians and the Greeks
    where massacred as well… And to this day

  • Canadian

    Hey IC, Canada recognizes the genocide. Get with the times.

  • Viiit

    And when is Israel going to sign that resolution?
    How disgustingly cowardly of Jews!

    • Love Love

      Shame to the World!!

  • Love Love

    I sure do hope Egypt takes this issue seriously.
    Honestly, I truly believe if the Armenian Holocaust was recognized and the perpetrators punished… then Jewish Holocaust would of not happened or the genocides/holocausts (that included Christians against Muslims, Muslims against Muslims, Christians againsts the Jews, etc…). Genocide is wrong.
    This is a fight against a mindset. This is a fight for Human Rights no matter your race/religion. Acceptance is the first step.

  • Love Love

    This is what happens when Turkey has a Historical Debate on the Armenian Genocide in Turkey:

    “Turkish TV Program Suspended for Comments on Genocide” The Armenian Weekly
    http://www.armenianweekly.com/2010/07/08/barsoumian-turkish-tv-program-suspended-for-comments-on-genocide/

  • Pharaonic

    ok, armenian people responding with hostility is really annoying..i mean, not even the US or Israel recognized it..Egypt in general doesnt take sides in such issues, but if it was opposed by egyptians they wouldnt have took that step..now that we dont give a flying fuck what turkey thinks, we dont really see the issue of recognizing it..remember that the armenians migrated to Egypt during the genocide, and we have a significant armenian community in Egypt..anyway, most of you people dont really understand what this means if Egypt recognize it..it means alot of countries will do the same, and turkey might as well go bankrupt because it will have to pay for the damages caused in the past! and trust me, there are way more ways for egypt to get back on turkey, that would cause significant damage to turkey’s economy and reputation! Remember egypt’s position regarding the world’s geopolitics and how it affects it..the armenians reaction to the news is really disappointing !

    • Love Love

      hostility?

      Systematic, organized killing of innocent civilians (wth their leaders first)…,
      then…

      Systematic, organized paranoid, dellusional denial of the killing for nearly 100 years…
      takes it’s toll..

      for Human Rights to take affects, you only need to be…a Human with Compassion.
      ….either Turkey can take the lead and take responsibility…or all the Nationals of the world take the Acceptance Stance and make Turkey take responsibility….(just like people who use chemical weapons)

  • Lucia Moon

    Sometimes, the action comes first, and then the good morals , start to appear. In other words at this point I am not concerned why Egypt is doing the right thing (recognizing the Armenian Genocide) it is great that they are recognizing it, period! If it took nearly 100 years to brake the silence and to remind the Turkey about their bloody hands drenched in Armenian blood, well … It is what it is. At least they are doing it now. I wonder what has to happen for the Israel to do the right thing? What motivation they need, other than the fact that Jews went through the same hell on earth? By the way commenting on the previous comment of Nune. Thank you for educating people about Nefirtity and her Armenian Heritage, though majority thinks she was a native Egyptian. Nefirtity was indeed an Armenian Who was taken to Egypt as a bride to marry an Egyptian emperor. When the Egyptian emperor saw a strikingly beautiful woman approaching him , he proclaimed: “Nefirtity!”, which simply meant” the beautiful one is coming” that’s how the Armenian beauty has entered the history of Egypt and the World!

  • Ariel Kahan

    Erdogan, was and still is a Islamist terrorist.
    The Armenian Genocide SHOULD HAVE been recognized and starting in 1915.
    The Armenian people suffered unheard of massacres and more than 2 million perished between 1914-1923.
    Turks have BLOOD on their hands…PERIOD.

  • Ariel Kahan

    Daniel Greenfield, as a fellow Jew, I have the “funny” sense that you are supportive of Muslim Turkey, just like our STUPID, SENILE and IDIOTIC looking Shimon Peres….the DOG SERVANT of Muslim Turks.
    Shame on ALL of my Jewish and Israeli compatriots, who for the sake of appeasing Muslim masses, are trying to put down and destroy the ONLY Christian nation east of occupied Greece (current day Turkey).
    With a friend like these Muslim savages, who needs another friend, right?
    Long live tiny, always alone, always betrayed, always attacked and always massacred, ARMENIA.
    Armenians, trust NO ONE but yourself. Just like we did in Israel, you MUST make your army small, mobile, professional, with newer military equipment. For some sad reasons, your air force is FROZEN…Why? A small air force of 50+ newer jet fighters will help your ground troops repel Turkic Islamic terroristic armies back,

  • Shengde Lian

    Sign
    White House Petition to Declare al-Sisi Terrorist for Butchering 900 civilians
    in #Egypt http://wh.gov/lgGo6

  • Lucia Moon

    Dear friend Amen to that ! I agree , 100% . The reason why we need to address and process all that pain is not only to acknowledge the losses but to be able to start having civil dialogues and thrive. Not to stand against each other but rather stand by each other and help one another to make the right decision. It is not easy to accept that ones’ ancestors were able to commit such crimes. But our generation has a chance to build the world we want to live in . Do not be offended by any Armenian being rude to you. It is the pain that has not been processed for 100 years almost. I get though comments too sometimes, but I understand that it is fear talking and the instinct of self preservance. It has been a pleasure debating with you. Check out my song on youtube . It is actually very relevant to our subject. ” deir-ez zor lucia moon” :) stay blessed :)

  • where is my vote?

    Frankly, this one-sided view is completely biased and misleading to any reader who doe not live in Egypt like so many have comments beneath. the story is, the leaders in SCAF took this action not for the sake of poor Egyptians like what they declared but only for protecting their economical interests and benefits. The pro-democracy demonstrators in all over the streets in Egypt are not against the Army but the opposite to the intervention of the military leaders in the civilian life and political aspect. i just frankly ask what the definition of such situation in Egypt from the prospective of political sciences ? no-one denies that 30 June is a military coup against the will of Egyptians who stood in the long queues to vote in 5 sequenced elections and referendum which resulted in the majority of Islamic current candidates came to power. After all, the losers from these elections found no way except calling military to intervene and remove the people whom been chosen by free will of Egyptians.