Why the Nidal Hasan/Fort Hood Jihad Case Isn’t Going Anywhere

Daniel Greenfield, a Shillman Journalism Fellow at the Freedom Center, is a New York writer focusing on radical Islam. He is completing a book on the international challenges America faces in the 21st century.


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Four years ago, Nidal Hasan, a Muslim terrorist serving as an Army shrink, murdered 13 people, after maintaining contact with an Al Qaeda leader.

The political establishment and the military and the media spent four years covering that up. When Nidal Hasan finally came to trial, he told the truth. He was fighting for the Taliban, for the Islamic Empire, against America.

The official media reports are that Hasan offered no defense for his actions. That’s a complete lie. He offered the above defense. The judge, Tara Osborn, brought in after the previous judge was accused of being unsympathetic toward the Fort Hood Jihadist, refused to allow him to offer that defense.

So Hasan mostly did nothing. He had already given his explanation.

What that means is that four years later, the case isn’t over. And it will go on dragging out the pain of the Fort Hood families.

According to the gold standard of the justice system in which every killer is entitled to be represented by a slimy lawyer who will completely lie about everything he’s done, Nidal Hasan did not receive representation.

Representation would have involved some sleazeball inviting in an expert to discuss secondary-PTSD and browbeating the witnesses over whether it really was Hasan who pulled the trigger.

So even though it’s unlikely that Hasan wants a rerun of the last four years, it’s coming anyway. The media, the military’s political generals and Obama Inc. want a proper trial to liberal lawyer standards. And eventually they’ll get one.

It may take another four years or forty. But they’ll keep going.

The irony is that in trying to save Nidal Hasan, they’re really punishing him. Hasan appears ready for the death penalty. Instead they’ll keep him alive indefinitely so they can have their trial and finally sentence him to life in prison.

  • tagalog

    The rather nasty reference to defense attorneys is defamatory.

    Just because my clients want to lie doesn’t make me a party to their lies. And if I find out that my client is lying I won’t let him testify under oath to that lie. Most defense attorneys (if not all) are ethically bound to at least that much integrity.
    On the other hand, I see all sorts of exaggerations, strategic omissions of fact, and the occasional lie in political commentary, both on the left and the right.

    • Mac Gregor

      I’m not a fan of hate-crime legislation (a crime is a crime regardless of motive) but could you explain to me how this could not be considered hate-crime? The religion itself teaches that unbelievers should be killed and Hasan obviously feels no remorse and feels justified in the killings. Admittedly, I do not fully understand hate-crime legislation, but could you, as a lawyer, please explain this to me? Aren’t the penalties supposed to be more severe? Thank you.

      • tagalog

        I don’t know what the federal law or the UCMJ says on hate crimes, but in my home state, if a crime is proved, and is then found to be a hate crime, the fact it’s a hate crime is an “aggravator” that makes the sentence harsher. I don’t like the concept of hate crimes either, it smacks too much of thought control. An assault is an assault, a murder a murder, regardless of whether the perpetrator liked or disliked the victim.

        As we are learning over and over again to our embarrassment, government prosecutors may or may not choose to pursue a prosecution claiming a hate crime. Was Nidal Hasan’s attack inspired by some form of hate? Based on what I’ve heard it sure seems like it. But if the prosecutors aren’t going to pursue it they’re within the scope of their discretion.

        • Mac Gregor

          Thank you for your response. Thought control is my concern as well. Big brother, anyone? As for a harsher sentence if hate is a factor, I would think Hasan’s punishment would be severe regardless but in this mixed up politically correct world, its anyone’s guess.

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Bryan-Schmick/100000836170959 Bryan Schmick

        We’ve had hate crime legislation for quite some time now. Consider the difference between first and third degree murder. Basically, was there a motive.

        • tagalog

          Not “was there a motive,” but “was the killing premeditated or done on some momentary impulse.”

    • John D

      Your contention that lawyers don’t lie is laughable. Exaggerations and omissions of facts are in fact lies. I guess being a lawyer, you didn’t realize that.

      • tagalog

        I didn’t say that lawyers don’t lie. I said that MOST lawyers don’t lie. After all, unlike the general run of American humanity, if we get caught, we can lose our license to earn our livelihood.

        • haifisch8587

          i would say that many lawyers, in providing a best defense are really guilty of aiding and abetting…

          • tagalog

            Of course you can say that, but you would be wrong.

            Lawyers ask questions. The stories get told by the witnesses, not by the lawyers, as answers to those questions. Most lawyers, as officers of the court bound by professional ethical rules, won’t deliberately allow those stories to be lying stories.

            After the evidence is taken, the lawyers on both sides have a chance to argue to either the judge or the jury why their interpretation of the facts is correct. It’s the judge or the jury who decide what the facts are.

  • BenJabo1Machal

    Northing will happen to Hassan, he has Muslim brother in the WH protecting his ass

  • BenJabo1Machal

    Midal is certain that nothing will happen to him, his Brother Muslim will protect him

  • BS77

    Back in FDR’s time, a murdering traitor like this would have been tried and hanged in a matter of weeks. This trial took four years…..this is a travesty.

    • quousque

      US military prosecuted the entire II World War campaign from Pearl Harbor to surrender on the deck of USS Missouri in a little bit longer than that. Mark Steyn pointed this fact in one of his columns.

  • SCREW SOCIALISM

    I can’t believe that it has been 4 years since the terrorist attack.

    The officers who tolerated hasans islamist ideology are ALSO guilty of ignoring the warning signs and doing NOTHING to prevent the tragedy. Those officers should be Dishonorably Discharged from the military. Their dereliction resulted in the deaths of Americas Best and Bravest.

    Also anyone who “Liked” the tzaranev brothers Facebook pages should be picked up and thrown out of the country.

    • John D

      You didn’t go far enough. The officers you mentioned are accessories to murder. They should be tried for crimes against humanity.

  • SCREW SOCIALISM

    hasan WILL be found guilty.

    I hope the miliatry court has the balls to sentence hasan to death, adding that his carcass will be buried in a cesspool sandwiched between pig carcases.

    • tagalog

      How can Hasan NOT be found Guilty? He didn’t put on a defense. The only evidence before the court is incriminating evidence. He HAS to be found Guilty as charged.

      The important question now is, what punishment will he be sentenced to?

      I bet it won’t be the death penalty. I hope I’m wrong.

      • objectivefactsmatter

        It will immediately be appealed. The question is whether a retrial will be ordered where he won’t be allowed to represent himself.

      • ziggy zoggy

        Evidence? Proof. He shot a lot of people who can identify him in front of other people who can identify him and he was caught with the murder weapon that he was proved to have fired.

        • tagalog

          Yes, in a court, that’s called “incriminating evidence,” as is Hasan’s admission in open court, when he began his defense by identifying himself as the person who shot all those people.

  • Naresh Krishnamoorti

    The real outrage is that when Sgt. Bales went into an Afghan village and shot 16 women and children, the U.S. government compensated the families of those Afghan victims nearly $1 million, which is a fortune in Afghanistan. On the other hand, the victims of Hasan’s terrorist attack can’t even get combat-wound pay and medical benefits.
    There is no clearer case of Obama preferring foreign Muslims to American patriots.

    • tagalog

      I forgot about that. Thanks for reminding us.

    • Productivity Market

      Disgusting. Obama makes me dream of a grassy knoll

      • objectivefactsmatter

        Don’t make a martyr out of him. They’ll spin it so bad that we’ll end up with a “black” POTUS and VP, both will be radical leftists and probably stealth jihadis as well.

        Take him out legally with undeniable evidence. Do the investigations.

    • CowboyUp

      The court proceedings probably went much different for the loyal Americans on trial, as well.

      • ziggy zoggy

        So did the kangaroo court trial for the Marines who pissed on dead terrorists. I don’t recall that going on more than four years with a crookedly sympathetic judge.

      • ziggy zoggy

        So did the kangaroo court trial for the Marines who pissed on dead terrorists. I don’t recall that going on more than four years with a crookedly sympathetic judge.

    • objectivefactsmatter

      0′Bama holds the office of POTUS. He does not represent us. He uses the office to pursue a radical globalist agenda. Any time it looks like my statement is an exaggeration you must remember that even POTUS has limits in what he can get away with. And he has gotten away with a lot already.

  • tagalog

    It’s just been reported that Nidal Hasan, in addition to NOT putting on a defense and resting, has waived his right to make a closing argument. We all expected Hasan to use his time in court to inveigh against the Great Satan and praise Allah and jihad to the stars. Evidently he’s not going to do that.

    • objectivefactsmatter

      That’s interesting. Maybe he is intentionally trying to make himself appear unable to represent himself competently.

      Sneaky MFer. I don’t think he wants to die. I think he wants to pontificate about what an awesome jihadi he is, who “really wants” to be a martyr while at the same time finding himself at the center of attention with catered meals for years to come.

      He’s happier now than ever before.

      • ziggy zoggy

        Except for the part about not being able to get his crippled little pecker up. Not even to jerk off to the Koran, the poor dear. 3:D

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Bryan-Schmick/100000836170959 Bryan Schmick

    So where was the NSA while Maj Hassan was communicating with a known terrorist?

    • Drakken

      Being told it wasn’t anything to worry about and forget anything being said.

    • objectivefactsmatter

      Not monitoring Muslims. The same place they are today.

  • herb benty

    Obama’s, ” wink wink, nudge nudge” to those thinking of attacking America, continues.

  • $26264211

    “Instead they’ll keep him alive indefinitely so they can have their trial and finally sentence him to life in prison.”

    Let’s hope not. Not only is this trial a joke, Hasan has made it one, and made a laughing stock out of the military justice system.

    If the military eventually sentences him to life, then that would be the ultimate injustice.

    I say, stop the clowning around, put him before a firing squad and send him straight to hell, where I know there are not 72 virgins waiting for him.

  • ziggy zoggy

    Obama and his apparatchiks only have three more years to drag this out, unless he declares himself Regent. Hillary is unelectable and whoever the next President is, it will likely be a Republican. Not even a Presidential pardon could save Hasan when 2017 rolls around.

  • John D

    Unfortunately, military trials seldom result in a death penalty.

    • haifisch8587

      The military has no hesitation in killing in the name of war, but af very reticent in condemning a murderer to death. More hypo racy of the judicial system .

    • Paul3571

      Maybe, in this case, that won’t be true.