Iran & Syria Accuse Israel in Beirut Suicide Bombings


Lebanon-Bombing-APTwo back-to-back suicide bombings on November 19th in the vicinity of the embassy of the Islamic Republic of Iran in Beirut, Lebanon killed at least 23 people and wounded more than 140. Iranian cultural attaché, Ebrahim Ansari, reportedly died from his wounds. An al-Qaida-linked Sunni group known as the Abdullah Azzam Brigades claimed responsibility for the attack. It threatened more attacks unless Iran withdraws its forces from Syria where Iran and its proxy Hezbollah have been providing military support for Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s regime.

The Iranian embassy appears to have been the main target of the attacks. One blast occurred near the main entrance of the Iranian embassy. The other went off in front of the Iranian ambassador’s residence.

The United Nations Security Council issued a press statement strongly condemning the terrorist attacks, reaffirming its view “that terrorism in all its forms and manifestations constitutes one of the most serious threats to international peace and security, and that any acts of terrorism are criminal and unjustifiable, regardless of their motivation, wherever, whenever and by whomsoever committed.”

Iran and Syria were quick to point the finger at Israel as bearing the primary responsibility for the suicide bombings. They both believe that Israel has taken sides with Sunni Arab states against the Shiites in the proxy war raging in Syria and extending into Lebanon. Iran and Hezbollah are Shiite. Assad’s Alawite sect derives from Shiite Islam. The jihadist rebels, along with their state sponsors Saudi Arabia, Qatar and other Gulf nations, are Sunnis.

Hezbollah chief Hassan Nasrallah previewed the theme of Israeli complicity with the Sunnis against the Shiites last week: “It is regrettable that (Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin) Netanyahu is the spokesman for some Arab countries. These countries reject any political solution that would stop the bloodbath and destruction in Syria. They also strongly oppose any accord between Iran and the countries of the world,” alluding to Israel’s and Saudi Arabia’s strong opposition to a nuclear deal they see as unduly favorable to Iran.

The suicide bombings in the vicinity of the Iranian embassy fit into this same Israeli-Sunni anti-Shiite conspiracy theory. As explained in a November 19, 2013 Foreign Policy article, the Syrian government, Iran and Hezbollah all see Israel’s guiding hand “behind the scenes” while the Gulf petrol-funded Sunni terrorists do the dirty work.

“The terrorist bombing in front of Iranian Embassy in Beirut is inhuman and vicious act perpetrated by Israel and its terror agents,” the spokeswoman of the Iranian Foreign Ministry Marzieh Afkham said.  “Tehran will seriously follow up the criminal act with due consideration.”

Iran’s ambassador Ghazanfar Roknabadi said that those who carried out the attacks “were serving the interests of the Zionist entity.” He added a warning: “We will never retreat one fingertip from our positions. We have ideals and principles, and in Syria we are pursuing interests. We are leading the confrontation line for anti-Zionist and anti-arrogance projects in the region.”

Hezbollah, which came from its home base of Lebanon to intervene in Syria to fight the rebel forces, is perfectly innocent of any acts of terrorism as far as Iran is concerned because Hezbollah is part of the anti-Zionist “confrontation line.”

Syria’s UN Ambassador H.E. Bashar Ja’afari claimed to reporters at UN headquarters in New York that Israel has acted in concert with Saudi Arabia and Qatar to support foreign agents in their launch of terrorist attacks inside of Syria. The latest suicide bombings in Beirut were a continuation of this pattern, he claimed, with absolutely no concrete evidence to back up his accusation.

It is true that Israel has contributed to the perception of an Israeli-Sunni alliance with its public display of a meeting of the minds with Saudi Arabia in opposing Iran. For example, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was quoted in the French daily Le Figaro on Saturday that there is a “meeting of the minds” between Israel and the “leading states in the Arab world” on the Iran issue – “one of the few cases in memory, if not the first case in modern times.” Syrian UN Ambassador Ja’afari seized on that quote, which was said in the context of combatting Iran’s nuclear ambitions, to support his broad accusation that Israel is in total cahoots with the enemies of Syria and Iran by supporting al Qaeda-affiliated terrorists.

Saudi Arabia has been more circumspect, denying reports of any cooperative contingency planning between Saudi Arabia and Israel. A Saudi foreign ministry spokesman said the kingdom “has no relations or contacts with Israel of any kind or at any level,” according to the state news agency SPA.

Saudi Arabia and Israel do not have formal diplomatic relations. Nevertheless, their interests overlap when it comes to Iran, which both see as an existential threat to their countries if Iran obtains the capacity to build and deliver nuclear weapons. Neither country welcomes the Muslim Brotherhood, al Qaeda or its offshoots within their own territory.

At the same time, however, there is a divergence when it comes to supporting the export of Islamic jihadism to other countries. To keep its own Wahhabists from turning against the Saudi regime, Saudi leaders seek to channel the anger of Islamic jihadists to destinations outside of Saudi Arabia. The Saudi government does not much care what damage they do, so long as the Saudi regime remains insulated from the ensuing violence.

Israel, on the other hand, has learned from the mistake it made more than thirty years ago in reportedly helping early on to foster Hamas, which traces its origins to the Muslim Brotherhood. At the time, Israel appeared to view Hamas through the prism of an organization supposedly built on Islamic religious principles, believing Hamas in its early stages to be a strategic counterweight to the more secular, nationalist Arafat-led terrorist PLO that Israel was fighting. Retired Israeli official Avner Cohen, who worked in Gaza for more than twenty years, witnessed this ill-conceived strategy unfold which, he said, turned out to be an “enormous, stupid mistake.”

Israel is anything but suicidal. It was burned once by trying to play off Islamists against secularist enemies and it backfired. Israel is not about to make the same mistake again in Syria. It knows that Al Qaeda is as determined as Hezbollah and Iran to destroy the Jewish state. Thus, Israel has nothing to gain by lending its support to al Qaeda-affiliated groups and helping to install them next door in the hope that such an outcome would be better than Assad staying in power. With Assad replaced by an al Qaeda-supported government while Iran and Hezbollah still remain threats to Israel in their own right, Israel would then have the worst of both worlds – many thousands of rockets under the control of Shiite Hezbollah pointed from Lebanon at Israeli civilians and potentially many more thousands of rockets and other weaponry under the control of Sunni al Qaeda jihadists pointed at Israeli civilians from Syria.

Israel’s overriding concern is to prevent Iran from reaching the nuclear arms finish line. It is willing to team with Saudi Arabia, France or anyone else who sees the danger of a nuclear-armed Iran the same way that Israel does. Israel’s interest in Syria and Lebanon is to prevent Hezbollah from obtaining any game-changing weaponry. Israel has relied on its own air power to conduct surgical strikes inside of Syria against convoys of weapons destined for Hezbollah. It does not need or want to rely on rebels on the ground to accomplish this limited objective.

In sum, the attempt to conflate Israel’s limited cooperation with Saudi Arabia in combatting the Iranian nuclear threat with the charge that Israel is in bed with al Qaeda-affiliated groups and their sponsors in launching terrorist attacks in Syria and Lebanon is both preposterous and slanderous.

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Don’t miss Jamie Glazov‘s video interview with Mudar Zahran, the leader of Palestinians in Jordan who now resides in the U.K. as a political refugee. He discusses “The Palestinian Homeland in Jordan.” He also explains his support of Israel, denounces the Islamists and calls out the western media for being Israel haters and not caring about the Palestinians:

Freedom Center pamphlets now available on Kindle: Click here.

  • SCREW SOCIALISM

    DEATH! to the islamofascist regime of iran!

    LONG LIVE PERSIA!

    • defcon 4

      The Zoroastrians who once ran Persia are nothing but a shrinking, persecuted minority now. The civilisation of Persia is gone, annihilated by submission to islam0fascism, and replaced by same.

  • Bamaguje

    “To keep its own Wahhabists from turning against the Saudi regime, Saudi
    leaders seek to channel the anger of Islamic jihadists to destinations
    outside of Saudi Arabia. The Saudi government does not much care what
    damage they do, so long as the Saudi regime remains insulated from the
    ensuing violence.” – Joseph Klein.

    Little wonder that although Saudi Arabia & Qatar fuel Syria’s civil war by funding and arming Sunni Jihadists, these Sunni Gulf Arab nations stoutly refuse to take in any Syrian refugees.

    On the plus side, its nice to see Iran swallow some of its own medicine. The murderous Shiite Mullah tyranny had hitherto been involved in attacks on US embassy in Beriut and Israeli embassy in Argentina.

    • SCREW SOCIALISM

      The islamic regime of iran needs to suffer a lot more.

      Soon the Persian people will rise up and overthrow the ayatollahs.

      • defcon 4

        If you’re going to dream, dream big. Yeah they’ll overthrow the asinine ayatollahs and create yet another “moderate” islam0fascist state.

      • Drakken

        The Persian have been dead for over 800 years, what is left is arab infested and inbred filth, let them rot.

        • defcon 4

          The Parsi were the Persians, they were the inheritors of the Persian culture, they represent what the Persians once were, theirs was the religious faith of the more tolerant Persians, not islam. The Parsi are being steadily eradicated from Iran (the birthplace of their ancient faith). The largest communities of Parsi are not found in Iran anymore, but in India.

  • Ken Kelso

    It’s your usual “one size fits all” diagnosis with a single prescription for all ills: whenever there is a mess, a dilemma or a complicated situation, just point a finger at Israel and the Jews.
    Welcome to the mentality of the Muslims.

  • Ken Kelso

    Complaining and put the blame on others (Israel) is a local Arab and Muslim specialty.

    • defcon 4

      No, it’s islamic doctrine. After all, if Jews weren’t perfidious liars who betrayed islam’s holiest prophet, then why did muhammad seize all the properties and holdings of the Jewish tribes in Saudi Barbaria and have these same, prosperous, peaceful Jewish tribes expelled, slaughtered or enslaved?

  • Ken Kelso

    The Old Muslim Blame game

    With the start of the Arab Spring revolts, both the rulers and the opposition tried to portray the issues through a ridiculous but strangely rife theory that Jews were behind all the events and were busy conspiring against Muslims and Arabs. By forging competing anti-Semitic propaganda and producing conspiracies for the purpose of pointing a finger at Israel and Jews, each side tried to demonize the other side by associating it with Israel. In Libya, rebels claimed that the mother of Gaddafi was Jewish as a way of defaming the anti-Semitic dictator; Iranian officials did not hesitate to call the Syrian uprising, in its early phase, a conspiracy masterminded by Zionists; and Bashar al-Assad repeated the same accusations. And this list goes on.

    Narrow-mindedness kept the uprisings’ leadership and supporters from harnessing all existing potential. Instead of dealing with root causes of the problems, they had a ‘one size fits all’ diagnosis with a single prescription for all ills: just point a finger at Israel and the Jews.”

    In my view, one reason why the Arab Spring succeeded in toppling old dictatorships but didn’t succeed in replacing them with genuine democracy was that narrow-mindedness kept the uprisings’ leadership and supporters from harnessing all existing potential. Instead of dealing with root causes of the problems, they preferred to choose a simplistic answer and solution for all unresolved issues. They had a “one size fits all” diagnosis with a single prescription for all ills: whenever there is a mess, a dilemma or a complicated situation, just point a finger at Israel and the Jews.

    This particular strategy has been employed extensively in Iran’s domestic politics since the 1979 Islamic Revolution, both as a scapegoat for internal problems and as leverage against political rivals. For example, after President Ahmadinejad defied Supreme Leader Khamenei, ultra-conservative groups labeled him a secret Jew. His mentor, Rahim Mashai and Rahim’s companions are labeled `Devious Current` by Khamenei’s supporters. This is partly because, despite disavowing his words and lambasting Israel’s policy, Rahim Mashai once opined that the two nations of Iran and Israel are friends. Within this context, Jews equal evil and are considered the source of all wrongdoing, misery and misconduct.

    • defcon 4

      I remember in the Libyan “Arab Spring” Qadaffi was being similarly painted as a Jew. I wonder if similar accusations have been leveled against Assad?

  • Ken Kelso

    The Muslims need Jews more than any other population group on earth. Without Jews, who will the Muslims have to blame for the excesses and failures of their death cult?

    The Muslim world needs Israel to blame for all the death, poverty and destruction across Islam done by Muslims killing Muslims.

  • Ken Kelso

    Poor Iran and Syria.
    I thought it was the JOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOS.
    ————————————————
    Armed group says it carried out Beirut blasts
    Al-Qaeda-linked Abdullah Azzam Brigades calls deadly Lebanon bombing a message to Iran and Hezbollah.
    Nov 20 2013

    A Lebanese group linked to al-Qaeda has claimed responsibility for Tuesday’s double suicide bombing outside Iran’s embassy in Beirut that killed at least 23 people, including a senior Iranian diplomat, and wounded more than 100 others.

    The bombing in the Lebanese capital was one of the deadliest in a series of attacks targeting Hezbollah, the Shia armed group, and Shia strongholds in the country in recent months.

    The Abdullah Azzam Brigades has said the attack is a “message of blood and death” to Iran and Hezbollah – both supporters of Syrian President Bashar Assad.

    Iranian embassy sources told Al Jazeera that five security guards besides the diplomat were among the dead.

    The diplomat was identified by Ghazanfar Roknabadi, the Iranian ambassador, as Ibrahim Ansari, who took up his post a month ago and was overseeing regional cultural activities.

    Also among the dead was Radwan Fares, a Lebanese national who headed the facility’s security, according to a Lebanese official at the Iranian embassy.

    Ban Ki-moon, the UN secretary-general, speaking through the organisation’s deputy spokesman Farhan Haq, condemned the attacks and called on all Lebanese to recognise that “such appalling and indiscriminate acts of violence” target everyone in the country.

    John Kerry, US secretary of state, called the bombings “senseless and despicable”, and said “our hearts go out to the Iranian people after this violent and unjustifiable attack claimed the life of at least one of their diplomats”.

    Chaotic aftermath

    The midmorning explosions hit Janah, a Hezbollah-dominated neighbourhood and home to several embassies and upscale apartments, leaving bodies and pools of blood on the glass-strewn street amid burning cars.

    The first suicide attacker was on a motorcycle with 2kg of explosives and blew himself up at the Iranian embassy’s black main gate, damaging the three-storey facility, a Lebanese security official said.

    Less than two minutes later, a second suicide attacker driving a car rigged with 50kg of explosives struck about 10 metres away, the official said.

    In the chaotic aftermath, volunteers tried to extinguish bodies still aflame from the blast by covering them with their sweaters and blankets.

    “The sheer scale of the destruction is an indication as to how powerful the explosives were,” Al Jazeera’s Zeina Khodr, reporting from near the site on Tuesday, said.

    The official Iranian news agency, IRNA, quoted a Foreign Ministry spokesman as saying the bombings were “an inhuman crime and spiteful act done by Zionists and their mercenaries”. Israel denied any links.

    Syria’s government said the attacks “reek of petrodollars” – a reference to oil-rich Gulf Arab countries such as Saudi Arabia and Qatar that back the rebellion against Damascus.

    ‘Martyrdom operation’

    The Abdullah Azzam Brigades, which has previously fired rockets at Israel from Lebanese territory, claimed responsibility for the Beirut attack in a Twitter post.

    “This is a double-martyrdom operation carried out by two heroes from the heroic Sunnis of Lebanon,” Sirajeddin Zreikat, a member of the group, said.

    “Operations will continue in Lebanon until two demands are met: first, withdrawing Hezbollah members from Syria; second, release our prisoners from jails of injustice in Lebanon.”

    Ali Mikdad, a Hezbollah politician, told the local Lebanese staion, Al-Mayadeen TV: “We tell those who carried out the attack, you will not be able to break us. We got the message and we know who sent it and we know how to retaliate.”

    The bombing is expected to pull Lebanon further into a conflict that has torn apart the deeply divided country, and came as Assad’s troops, aided by Hezbollah fighters, captured a key town near the Lebanese border from rebels.

    The Syrian army’s border offensive is part of a larger government push that started last month and has seen forces loyal to Assad firmly seizing the momentum in the war, taking one rebel stronghold after another.

    • Drakken

      I love it when the muslim savages kill each other, I wish we would have a new pastime of watching haji and company wage jihad against the other muslims across the hill and I’ll get the bourbon.

  • defcon 4

    If Israel were to launch strikes against Iran from Saudi Barbaria, an extremely hard concept to swallow in itself, who would trust the Saudi despots not to stab Israel in the back once the strikes succeeded? Maybe when the IAF planes land in Saudi Barbaria to refuel after their successful strike?

  • Ken Kelso

    Ok, here’s how the bombing went down in Beirut

    The 4000 Jews who didn’t show up at the World Trade Center on September 11th, told the Mossad Bird to tell the Mossad Vulture to tell the Mossad Shark to swim into Lebanon and and plant the bombs there. There the Mossad Squirrel picked up the bombs and detonated the bombs at the Iranian embassy.

    Rumor has it, the Mossad Turtle is the real boss of the Mossad Bird, Mossad Shark, Mossad Vulture and Mossad Squirrel.

  • Omar

    I have a better idea for how to secure peace in the Middle East. Why doesn’t Israel just take over the entire region. If the whole Middle East became one large Israel, the rights and liberties of people, regardless of characteristics, will be protected under the law, the country will be a democratic republic, the whole region will advance into the 21st century and the Islamists will be put on a leash and kept in check. The one large Israel is actually Andrew Klavan’s idea. But, of couse, such a proposal is nearly impossible because the Islamists have so much power in the world.

    • defcon 4

      But who in their right mind would want to rule over a bunch of raving, mendacious, islam0fascist maniacs? Maybe it would be better to employ Arclight strikes to turn the clock back to the late Iron Age for the islam0fascist bastards, because that’s where they want to be anyway. Let them wallow in their islam0fascist sties.

    • Drakken

      You would have to make the entire region completely Islamic free, the Israeli’s don’t have the stomach for such actions, so bombem back to the stone age and let them sit in the dark.

  • Metatron Too

    Wherever there are Muslims, there are lies and sadistic actions by them. It’s like Satan trained them.

  • Drakken

    I am utterly laughing so hard at the rich irony of Iran/Hezbollah who blew up my Barracks and the US Embassy twice, have finally gotten a rich taste of their own bitter medicine. Burn Motherfu**** Burn!

  • Drakken

    I am utterly laughing so hard at the rich irony of Iran/Hezbollah who blew up my Barracks and the US Embassy twice, have finally gotten a rich taste of their own bitter medicine. Burn Motherfu**** Burn!

  • Drakken

    You would have to make the entire region completely Islamic free, the Israeli’s don’t have the stomach for such actions, so bombem back to the stone age and let them sit in the dark.

  • Drakken

    I love it when the muslim savages kill each other, I wish we would have a new pastime of watching haji and company wage jihad against the other muslims across the hill and I’ll get the bourbon.

  • Drakken

    The Persian have been dead for over 800 years, what is left is arab infested and inbred filth, let them rot.

  • defcon 4

    The Parsi were the Persians, they were the inheritors of the Persian culture, they represent what the Persians once were, there’s was the religious faith of the more tolerant Persians, not islam. The Parsi are being steadily eradicated from Iran (the birthplace of their ancient faith). The largest communities of Parsi are not found in Iran anymore, but in India.

  • defcon 4

    Let them hate…as long as they fear.