Terror Through Asylum

European nations offer open arms to ticking time bombs.

The police in the German city of Cologne recently arrested Mohammad J., a 16-year-old Syrian asylum seeker. He and his parents arrived in Germany in January 2016 and applied for asylum there – along with more than one million other aslyum seekers, most of whom were from the Middle East and North Africa. In Internet chats Mohammad J. expressed his “unmistakable willingness” to carry out a bombing attack, Klaus-Stephan Becker from Cologne’s Criminal Police claimed. 

A chat partner from abroad gave him “clear hints” on how to make a bomb, Becker said. Yet no further preparations had been made by the arrested terror suspect.  The Cologne police discovered that the suspect’s cell phone showed that he received instructions from “a person with links to ISIS who is living abroad.” This person succeeded in recruiting the 16-year-old Syrian asylum seeker.

Mohammad J. was not the only Syrian asylum seeker who has been arrested recently. The well-informed German newspaper Bild reported on September 13, 2016, that the German anti-terror unit “GSG9” arrested three Syrian “refugees” in Schleswig-Holstein and Lower Saxony (near Hamburg). They were 26-year-old Mohammed A., 18-year-old Ibrahim M. and 17-year-old Mahir al-H. The German federal prosecutor said that these three young Syrians arrived in Germany in November 2015, either with a pre-planned mission or waiting for further instructions. 

Bild also quoted Bavaria’s Interior Minister Joachim Hermann who said: “Meanwhile, we know now that ISIS deliberately profited from lapses in our security system and smuggled terrorists disguised as asylum seekers into Europe.” And German Interior Minister Thomas de Mazière reported, according to Bild, that the three arrested Syrian asylum seekers were linked both to ISIS and to the ISIS terror cell that struck in Paris in November 2015. “They could have been a sleeper cell,” De  Mazière said. He referred to so-called “Hit-Teams” smuggled into Europe by ISIS. “This is what happened when ISIS struck in Brussels and Paris.”

Mohammed A.,  Ibrahim M. and Mahir al-H. had first left Turkey on a boat loaded with refugees bound for Greece and subsequently followed the so-called “Balkan route,” entering Germany in November 2015, Bild writes. They were assisted by exactly the same migrant trafficking organization that assisted the ISIS terrorists who struck in Paris last November. Their forged Syrian passports were also from the same forger in the Middle East.

Bild refers to security sources who claim that the German Federal Crime Agency (BKA) is now checking information about more than 400 ISIS or Al-Nusra extremists among the refugees in Germany. Lothar de Mazière said that preliminary proceedings have been initiated against 60 perople.

CNN reported on September 5, 2016, that “the sophisticated ISIS network that plots foreign strikes had planned for the carnage in the November 2015 attacks in Paris to be far worse, to occur in other European countries as well and, investigators believe, had planned to follow them up with strikes in various locations.” CNN said it had "obtained thousands of pages of documents from internal European investigations.”

There were “two ISIS attackers who never reached France,” the news network reported. They were Algerian-born Adel Haddadi and Muhammad Usman from Pakistan. Both of them set out from Raqqa, the so-called “capital” of ISIS in Syria, in early October 2015. “They were part of a team, investigators concluded. The two others, Ahmad Al-Mohammad and Mohammad Al-Mahmod, would later blow themselves up outside the national stadium.” They entered Europe on refugee boats, but the Greeks detained Haddadi and Usman after they had discovered that their Syrian passports were fake. They were released at the end of October and continued their journey, passing through the Balkans and arriving in Austria on November 14, 2015, where they applied for asylum. On December 10, however, they were arrested at a refugee center near Salzburg. 

“The documents show that their journey was directed by a shadowy ISIS leader in Syria, known only as Abu Ahmad,” CNN claims. “Operating like a puppet-master from afar, Abu Ahmad handled their logistics: connecting them with smugglers and cars for transport, providing pre-programmed cell phones and getting them fake Syrian passports.” According to CNN, both "men’s phones have given European officials rich sources to mine, revealing dozens of contacts accros Europe and the Middle East.”

It is only the tip of the iceberg. Over 300,000 asylum seekers crossed the Mediterranean Sea and entered Italy and Greece between January and mid-September 2016. Many of them traveled to Germany where the authorities simply cannot cope with another massive influx of Muslim asylum seekers. Bild reported on September 22, 2016, that there are now nearly 550,000 rejected asylum seekers in Germany alone. Some 400,000 of them have lived in that country for more than six years. Only 13,134 illegal immigrants have been deported in the first seven months of 2016.

There is a long history of Muslim extremists applying for asylum in Europe. There have been at least two Syrian asylum seekers who led Al-Qaeda terror cells: Imad Eddin Barakat Yarkas, who operated from Madrid, and Omar Bakri Mohammad, a hate cleric who operated from London. London is also known as “Londonistan” because lots of radical Muslims found refuge in that city. Some of them have even plotted terror attacks.

Even Al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden applied for asylum in Britain in December 1995. He had also established a media organization and a printing house in London. Bin Laden was in Sudan at the time, but the Sudanese wanted to kick him out. They were under increasing American pressure to do so. As a result, Bin Laden and his dangerous Al-Qaeda organization had to look for another safe haven. 

Michael Howard, a Conservative politician and former British Home Secretary, told The Times in September 2005: “In truth, I knew little about him, but we picked up information that Bin Laden was very interested in coming to Britain. It was apparently a serious request.” 

“British Home Office officials investigated him and Howard issued an immediate banning order under Britain’s immigration laws,” The Times reported. It was known also in April 1996 that Bin Laden was interested in finding a new safe-haven in London. 

Although there may be humanitarian considerations to “welcome” Syrian or Iraqi refugees, there are also huge security risks. Too many of these “refugees” are radical Muslims and anti-Semites and the West is importing the conflicts and cultural backwardness from the Muslim world. This is why Hungary, Macedonia, Slovakia and Poland refuse to accept more Muslim refugees. The rest of Europe is failing to follow their lead, and at their own peril. 

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