WW2 Navajo Code Talkers Appear in Redskins Jackets; Liberal Heads Explode

"My opinion is that's a name that not only the team should keep, but that's a name that's American."

The Redskins, as everyone who isn't the media by now knows, got their name from their Native American players back in the day. Some of the surviving WW2 Navajo code talkers may know that, because unlike liberals, they weren't born yesterday.

As a joint celebration of the NFL’s Salute to Service month and Native American Heritage month, the Washington Redskins recognized four members of the Navajo Code Talkers Association.

The code talkers were a group of Native American service members who transmitted secret communications beginning in World War II.

Four representatives — Navajo Code Talkers Association President Peter MacDonald Sr., Vice President Roy Hawthorne and members George James Sr. and George Boyd Willie Sr. — were recognized during a commercial break during the first quarter of the Redskins’ game vs. the San Francisco 49ers. They stood in the end zone nearest the tunnel that leads to the Redskins’ locker room and received a round of applause while a video tribute to the code talkers played.

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The event got lots of snide remarks from white liberals, particularly the Deadspin crew, which is everything you expect from a Gawker franchise. Meanwhile the Navajo code talkers had no problem wearing Redskins gear.

Roy Hawthorne, 87, of Lupton, Ariz., was one of four Code Talkers honored for their service in World War II during the Monday night game against the San Francisco 49ers.

Hawthorne, vice president of the Navajo Code Talkers Association, said the group's trip was paid for by the Redskins. The four men met briefly with team owner Dan Snyder but did not discuss the name, Hawthorne said.

Still, he said he would endorse the name if asked, and the televised appearance in which three of the Indians wore Redskins jackets spoke for itself.

"We didn't have that in mind but that is undoubtedly what we did do," Hawthorne said when asked if he was intending to send a statement with the appearance. "My opinion is that's a name that not only the team should keep, but that's a name that's American."

Sadly liberals are not American.

"It does not take a code talker to crack this particular code," columnist Dave Zirin wrote in The Nation. "Dan Snyder is on the wrong side of history."

That one is hilarious. Because it's a fat white guy making a joke about WW2 heroes to uh fight racism. Also he's the sports editor of The Nation. Did you know The Nation even had one? Neither did its readers.

Zirin has also published Welcome to the Terrordome: The Pain, Politics, and Promise of Sports, and A People’s History of Sports in the United States, a sports-related volume in the manner of Howard Zinn's A People's History of the United States series for The New Press.

Zirin called for a boycott against sports teams from Arizona, in particular the Diamondbacks, to protest the Arizona SB 1070, the Support Our Law Enforcement and Safe Neighborhoods Act

On June 2, 2010, writing for The Nation, Zirin justified the decision of the Turkish U-19 soccer team to boycott a match against Israel. He described the Gaza flotilla raid as an act of state terror committed by the Israeli government and proposed a boycott of Israel

On October 6, 2011, during a live interview conducted on the sports cable television network, ESPN, Zirin referred to Hank Williams, Jr. as a racist and proslavery after Williams, the writer and singer of ESPN's then-Monday Night Football theme song, made a political statement in which he seemingly compared multiracial US President Barack Obama to former German national socialist leader, Adolf Hitler

Just the guy you want to hear from.

Navajo

 

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