Greenpeace Co-Founder: No Evidence of Man-Made Global Warming

"We are not capable of predicting which way temperatures will go next."


Patrick Moore has been speaking out about this before and like other skeptics, including Freeman Dyson, has gotten the expected treatment by the left. Now he appeared in Congress to make a point that is backed by science, but denied by a climate science establishment getting fat off Global Warming and Green Energy grants.

A Greenpeace co-founder testified in Congress on Tuesday about global warming. What he said is hardly what anyone would expect.

"There is no scientific proof that human emissions of carbon dioxide are the dominant cause of the minor warming of the Earth's atmosphere over the past 100 years," said Moore, who was testifying before the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee's Subcommittee on Oversight.

"If there were such a proof, it would be written down for all to see. No actual proof, as it is understood in science, exists."

Moore didn't hold back in his Senate appearance. He quickly zeroed in on the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and strongly scolded it for claiming there is a "95-100% probability" that man "has been the dominant cause of" global warming. Those numbers, he said, have been invented.

He also characterized the IPCC's reliance on computer models as futile; told senators that history "fundamentally contradicts the certainty that human-caused CO2 emissions are the main cause of global warming"; and noted that "during the Greenhouse Ages," a period that precedes our fossil-fuel burning civilization, "there was no ice on either pole and all the land was tropical and subtropical from pole to pole."

Moore further crossed the line of accepted climate change discourse when he insisted "that a warmer temperature than today's would be far better than a cooler one" and reminded lawmakers "that we are not capable, with our limited knowledge, of predicting which way" temperatures "will go next."

Anyone who has been caught in the snow because the NOAA predicted a warmer winter already knows that. Our ability to predict the weather grows hazier at a distance in time. We can't predict the weather two weeks from now. We certainly can't predict the weather two hundred years from now.

Meanwhile James Lovelock, the eccentric figure behind Gaia and a revered figure in the Warmist community, is also being most unhelpful though for another reason.

Lovelock believes global warming is now irreversible, and that nothing can prevent large parts of the planet becoming too hot to inhabit, or sinking underwater, resulting in mass migration, famine and epidemics. Britain is going to become a lifeboat for refugees from mainland Europe, so instead of wasting our time on wind turbines we need to start planning how to survive. To Lovelock, the logic is clear. The sustainability brigade are insane to think we can save ourselves by going back to nature; our only chance of survival will come not from less technology, but more.

Nuclear power, he argues, can solve our energy problem - the bigger challenge will be food. "Maybe they'll synthesise food. I don't know. Synthesising food is not some mad visionary idea; you can buy it in Tesco's, in the form of Quorn. It's not that good, but people buy it. You can live on it." But he fears we won't invent the necessary technologies in time, and expects "about 80%" of the world's population to be wiped out by 2100. Prophets have been foretelling Armageddon since time began, he says. "But this is the real thing."

Recycling, he adds, is "almost certainly a waste of time and energy", while having a "green lifestyle" amounts to little more than "ostentatious grand gestures". He distrusts the notion of ethical consumption. "Because always, in the end, it turns out to be a scam ... or if it wasn't one in the beginning, it becomes one."

He saves his thunder for what he considers the emptiest false promise of all - renewable energy.

"You're never going to get enough energy from wind to run a society such as ours," he says. "Windmills! Oh no. No way of doing it. You can cover the whole country with the blasted things, millions of them. Waste of time."

Mind you, in 2012, Lovelock admitted he was too alarmist about Global Warming.

James Lovelock, the maverick scientist who became a guru to the environmental movement with his “Gaia” theory of the Earth as a single organism, has admitted to being “alarmist” about climate change and says other environmental commentators, such as Al Gore, were too.

Lovelock, 92, is writing a new book in which he will say climate change is still happening, but not as quickly as he once feared.

He previously painted some of the direst visions of the effects of climate change. In 2006, in an article in the U.K.’s Independent newspaper, he wrote that “before this century is over billions of us will die and the few breeding pairs of people that survive will be in the Arctic where the climate remains tolerable.”

The moral of the story is that environmentalists are basically trolls and should be ignored.