Obama says Voter Fraud Doesn't Exist at Event Run by Man Who Embraced Fraudster Who Voted for Him Nine Times

Melowese voted twice for herself in 2012 and three times for her comatose sister.

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Voter fraud is a myth, like fairies, unicorns and the fall of the USSR. Just ask America's leading Chicago politician.

Speaking at Al Sharpton's National Action Network convention on Friday in New York City, President Barack Obama revealed that he believes voter fraud does not exist, everyone who wants to should be able to vote, even if they cannot provide identifying documentation, and Republicans are plotting to take the franchise away from minorities.

Obama, who hails from a city known for the Daley Machine and its "vote early and vote often" slogan, ripped Republicans for trying to preserve the integrity of the ballot by reducing voter fraud and requiring voter IDs.

"The right to vote is threatened today in a way that it has not been since the Voting Rights Act became law nearly five decades ago," Obama said.

He added that "justice requires the right to vote," and Republicans want voters to be required to have "IDs that millions of Americans don't have."

Obama insisted that no "real widespread voter fraud" exists, and he said that "people who deny our rights by making bogus arguments about voter fraud" are, in fact, "the real frauds."

He also said that Attorney General Eric Holder will be vigilantly looking at all the voting laws that are passed, along with civic organizations.

So does voter fraud actually exist or was it all made up by a vast right wing conspiracy? Let's ask Al Sharpton.

The Rev. Al Sharpton, keynote speaker at Thursday’s rally to kick-off the campaign for an Ohio Voters’ Bill of Rights Ohio Constitutional amendment, hugged Melowese Richardson.

Melowese voted twice for herself in 2012 and three times for her comatose sister. She admitted to sending an absentee ballot in for her granddaughter, who subsequently voted in person on election day. Three additional absentee ballots were also generated from Richardson’s home address, and all bore similar handwriting.

Melowese Richardson. The Republicans made her up.

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