Cuba Secret Police Thug Tours US Naval Base

Why should the enemies of our country be forced to take the trouble to actually hack into our systems when Obama can just give them the grand tour, as Fausta reports.

Valdés is not someone you’d expect to see as an honored guest of the U.S. military. As chief of investigations for Cuba’s National Revolutionary Police, a part of the military-controlled Ministry of the Interior, he plays a key law enforcement role in a state where beating and arresting human rights activists is considered law enforcement. Yet there he was at a U.S. naval air base in Key West, Fla., on April 21, touring the facilities at the invitation of the U.S. military command for Latin America.

US military command, means Obama. The US military command did not suddenly decide to throw open their doors to the enemy.

The mission of PNR is "Defense of the Socialist Motherland". It's also closely tied in with Cuba's secret police.

During the late 1990s, numerous reports by human rights groups also stated that PNR officers routinely assisted the non-uniformed personnel of the DSE in matters related to the activities of Cuban dissidents. On occasion, political detainees have been taken to PNR precinct stations, where they have been held briefly before being released or transferred to other facilities associated with the DSE. 

The DSE is the Cuban equivalent of the KGB or Gestapo when it comes to domestic political Socialist terror.

Among the more notorious arms of the current police organization is the Departmento de Seguridad del Estado (DSE), or Department of State Security. Created in 1961, by 1979 it was estimated to number ten to fifteen thousand agents, many operating domestically in covert operations. In 1984, the U.S. State Department labeled this organization as “a secret police” responsible for the disappearance of numerous Cuban citizens as well as naturalized U.S. citizens who returned to the island. Deployed throughout the island, DSE members are trained by the military and are familiar with the latest electronic surveillance techniques. During the 1970s, Soviet KGB tactics became part of the established procedures of the “secret police.”

Hope. Change. Terror.

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