Judge Orders Maryland Bar to Investigate Hillary Chief of Staff

Standards. Do we still have those anymore?

A Maryland judge ordered the state bar to open an investigation Monday into the three lawyers who helped former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton delete her private emails.

Anne Arundel County Circuit Court Judge Paul F. Harris Jr. said the complaints lodged against David E. Kendall, Cheryl Mills and Heather Samuelson were egregious and the state bar couldn’t dismiss them as frivolous.

“There are allegations of destroying evidence,” Judge Harris said at a hearing Monday morning.

Mills was Hillary's Chief of Staff. She was also one of the Clintonworld vets being covered by the corrupt Comey immunity deal. From Benghazi to the Hillary email scandals, Mills was on point.

Yet despite signs that Clinton’s former chief of staff Cheryl Mills obstructed efforts by investigators to obtain Clinton’s emails, the FBI invited Mills to attend Clinton’s interview at FBI headquarters as one of her lawyers.

“It’s absolutely outrageous,” Judicial Watch president Tom Fitton said.

“The FBI saw massive document destruction and clear intent to withhold material evidence,” he added, “and they just ignored that obstruction, and even let her sit in on the interview.”

According to former Deputy Assistant Secretary Raymond Maxwell, the after-hours session took place over a weekend in a basement operations-type center at State Department headquarters in Washington, D.C. This is the first time Maxwell has publicly come forward with the story.

“When Cheryl saw me, she snapped, ‘Who are you?’” Maxwell says. “Jake explained, ‘That’s Ray Maxwell, an NEA deputy assistant secretary.’ She conceded, ‘Well, OK.'”

Maxwell says the two officials, close confidants of Clinton, appeared to check in on the operation and soon left.

Maxwell says after Mills and Sullivan arrived, he, the office director and an intern moved into a small office where they looked through some papers. Maxwell says his stack included pre-attack telegrams and cables between the U.S. embassy in Tripoli and State Department headquarters. After a short time, Maxwell says he decided to leave.

So we've got a very belated response that may or may not produce a modicum of justice.

 

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