Marine Corps Sniper Railroaded by Obama Inc. has Conviction Overturned

This case was another one of many disgusting abuses of power by Obama Inc. and its cronies in the military. The goal was to show the Islamic terrorists killing our soldiers how nice we are by lynching our own.

Now there may finally be justice.

In December 2012, Staff Sgt. Joseph Chamblin was sentenced to 30 days' confinement, docked in pay, and demoted to sergeant for participating in an incident in which multiple Marine snipers attached to 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marines, urinated on enemy Taliban corpses and then posted a video of the act to YouTube.

The scandal would continue to make headlines in the years following, after a Marine attorney, Maj. James Weirick, came forward to allege that the then-commandant of the Marine Corps, Gen. Jim Amos, had attempted to interfere with the cases to ensure harsh punishments for the Marines involved. Evidence of this alleged interference mounted.

A 2012 affidavit from then-Lt. Gen. Thomas Waldhauser, appointed by Amos as the oversight authority for the sniper cases, states that Amos told him the Marines involved needed to be "crushed" and discharged from the Corps.

Waldhauser, now the four-star commander of U.S. Africa Command, also alleged that Amos asked him whether he would give all the snipers general courts-martial, the highest form of criminal trial. When Waldhauser responded he would not, Amos allegedly told him he could make someone else the convening authority for the cases.

Two days later, Amos did just that, appointing then-Lt. Gen. Richard Mills to take over. He told Waldhauser he had "crossed the line" in their previous conversation and was removing Waldhauser to fix that problem.

Chamblin, who left the Marine Corps shortly after his conviction, published a book in 2015 called "Into Infamy: A Sniper's War."

In all, eight Marines were punished in the fallout from the sniper scandal. Several received administrative punishments. Staff Sgt. Edward Deptola and Sgt. Rob Richards, like Chamblin, pleaded guilty and received demotions at special court-martial proceedings. It's not clear if Richards' and Deptola's cases are also under appeal.

Richards, who was severely wounded in 2010 and had been nominated for a Bronze Star for valor on the 2011 Afghanistan deployment, died in 2014 at the age of 28. He was buried in Arlington National Cemetery with full military honors.

Can we rehabilitate the dead?

 

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