New York City May Pay New Yorkers to Inform on Each Other

The issue here is, surprisingly, parking not the pandemic. But between the police budget cuts and the police unions giving City Hall the finger, there are fewer meter maids out there to issue parking fines.

So one councilman is embracing the Stasi solution.

Keeping an eye out for people who are parked illegally could lead to some cash if a new bill before the city council becomes law.

That proposed bill would give whistleblowers $25 of each ticket issued as a result of people reporting it.

Informing on other people committing petty violations, not crimes, that exist partly so the government can collect fines, isn't "whistleblowing". It's informing. 

There's a huge difference between offering a reward to help catch dangerous criminals and making citizens complicit by giving them a financial incentive to help the city cash in with fines. 

This isn't a big deal, in theory, but it feels like another step into the Berlin on the Hudson dystopia that New York City is already tumbling toward.

Cultivating a society where informing on other people is considered a public service is already the reality state of cancel culture. Boosting it with rewards and transforming it into government policy takes us that much closer to a Stasi society. And no, I'm not refering to the New York Daily News' repugnant columnist.

How much longer at this rate until there are rewards for doxxing people who aren't wearing masks?

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