NYC Suicide Bomber Linked to NYC's Little Bangladesh Area

I had a feeling that Little Bangladesh was going to come up when I heard that Akayed Ullah, the Muslim suicide bomber who tried to blow up at the Port Authority bus terminal, was a Bangladeshi migrant from Brooklyn.

And it has.

Police and FBI were conducting searches at multiple Brooklyn addresses connected to Ullah. On East 84th Street, police were posted outside a house where Ullah is believed to have been living. Meanwhile, three miles away in Kensington, on Ocean Parkway, police have closed off a block as they sought to speak with Ullah's relatives inside an apartment building. 

You can see Muslims taking over streets in Little Bangladesh for mass prayers. I wrote about Little Bangladesh and its brewing violence back in 2014.

“I feel like I’m living in my own country,” the editor of one of the Bangladeshi newspapers in New York, said. “You don’t have to learn English to live here. That’s a great thing!”

Overhead may be the same sky, but Little Bangladesh has been cut off from Brooklyn and attached to a country thousands of miles away. Immigrants step off a plane from Bangladesh at JFK airport, get into a taxi driven by a Bangladeshi playing Bengali pop tapes and step out into a small slice of Bangladesh on McDonald Avenue.

And when the infidels of Brooklyn wander into their territory, they are glared at as the foreign intruders that they are.

In Chinatown, Buddhist temples and protestant churches sit side by side and in Latino neighborhoods, Adventist storefront churches and massive Catholic edifices co-exist; along with them can be found synagogues, Hindu and Zoroastrian temples and the whole dizzying array of religious diversity of a port city defined by its swells and tides of immigrants.

Bangladesh is more than 90 percent Muslim. Hindus are being attacked in the streets of its cities by Islamist mobs because Islam does not co-exist. The other religions of the city do not demand that everyone join them or acknowledge their supremacy and pay them protection money for the right to exist.

Islam does.

The number of Bangladeshis in New York has increased by 20 percent in only four years to an estimated 74,000. And those numbers don't take into account the unofficial Mohammeds living in basements while nursing their murderous grudges.

Jamaica, Queens is becoming the center of the Bangladeshi presence in New York. Another Mohammed, Quazi Mohammad Rezwanul Ahsan Nafis, lived here in a low rise development of indistinguishable buildings crammed together and studded with satellite dishes so the dwellers could watch the television programs of their home countries, and plotted the mass murder of Americans.

Mohammed described the United States as the Dar al-Harb, the realm of war, the territory yet to be conquered by the armies of Islam, and said that the only permissible reason for a Muslim to move to the United States was to conquer it by missionary work or by armed terror.

"I just want something big. Something very big," Mohammed said, "make one step ahead, for the Muslims . . . that will make us one step closer to run the whole world."

This is what we're dealing with. ISIS is just as an expression of the colonial manifest destiny of Islam. And Little Bangladesh is just yet another platform for the invasion of America.

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