Aussie Supreme Court Judge: We're Under Attack by Muslim Men Who Want to Impose Sharia Law

The thing that must never be mentioned is being mentioned. Again.

Australia has been "under attack" from a group of Muslim men wanting "to kill as many unbelievers as they can" for about 15 years, a Supreme Court judge has said.

Justice Desmond Fagan made the comments while sentencing Tamim Khaja, 20, who pleaded guilty in October to planning and preparing a terrorist attack two years ago.

The then 18-year-old was arrested while preparing for a lone wolf massacre, either at the US embassy in Sydney, an Army barracks in western Sydney, or at a court complex at Parramatta.

Counsel for the defendant, Ian Temby QC, tendered to the court a list of recent sentences handed down to other men who had been convicted of terror offences.

In response, Justice Fagan told the court that Australia had "been under attack for 15 years by about 40 Muslim men, to kill as many unbelievers as they can and impose Sharia law."

Sitting at Sydney West Trial Courts at Parramatta, Justice Fagan referred to verses in the Koran which he said described the duty of "a Muslim to wage Jihad".

All true. And absolutely embargoed.

The first rule of Islamic Fight Club is that we must never talk about it. The second rule is that if you talk about it, you're an Islamophobe. And so we're enmeshed in a brutal war without being allowed to discuss the nature and motives of the enemy. Justice Fagan will no doubt pay a price for his blunt honesty. The left will do its best to see that he does.

He's been very tough on the terrorist throughout the trial.

Justice Fagan described the then-teenager's face as expressionless - as it was when he spoke about having a large enough car to drive into people.

"He does seem in a state of a possessed religious fanaticism, devoid of empathy or humanity," the judge said.

He also stressed that the Muslim religion was not on trial but, as sentencing judge, he had to try and identify the source of Khaja's "depraved belief".

Khaja himself had said he was motivated not by watching YouTube videos but "straight from the verses of Quran".

And hasn't been sold on Jihadi rehab.

Defence counsel Greg Scragg requested a sentence date in February, saying Khaja would have been in a de-radicalisation program for some time by then and the court could consider evidence of its effectiveness.

"It's very much in the interests, in terms of the appropriate sentence [...] and the community, that this offender enter into such programs that are available to him," Mr Scragg told the court on Monday.

Justice Desmond Fagan said the matter should proceed promptly.

"If any weight is to be given to this I'd need to have evidence from a corrective services officer who would explain it to me," he told the court.

Khaja's plot was "effectively a mass-murder attack" in the interests of pursuing Islamic dominance of Australia, the judge said.

"The idea that a person can be rehabilitated from such views of religious zeal by a program needs some substantiation," Justice Fagan said.

He described as "extremely grave" the risk to the community and said Khaja had not acted in "a moment of rage or some passion" but in relation to a philosophy that he believed warranted mass murder.

The truth. It's easy enough to see.