Florida Department of State Sends Dem Voter Fraud Charges to Feds

The radical Left stole a Senate seat in Arizona where Republicans were too weak to stand up for themselves. But Florida Republicans seem to have more fight in them.

 The Florida Department of State last week asked federal prosecutors to investigate dates that were changed on official state election documents, the first voting “irregularities” it has flagged in the wake of the 2018 elections.

The concerns, which the department says can be tied to the Florida Democratic Party, center around date changes on forms used to fix vote-by-mail ballots sent with incorrect or missing information. Known as “cure affidavits,” those documents used to fix mail ballots were due no later than 5 p.m. on Nov. 5 — the day before the election. But affidavits released on Tuesday by the DOS show that documents from four different counties said the ballots could be returned by 5 p.m. on Thursday, which is not accurate.

The information was sent on Nov. 9 by Bradley McVay, DOS’ interim general counsel, who asked that the altered dates be investigated.

“Altering a form in a manner that provides the incorrect date for a voter to cure a defect … imposes a burden on the voter significant enough to frustrate the voter’s ability to vote,” McVay wrote in a letter that was sent Nov. 9 and released publicly on Tuesday. The letter was sent to U.S. Attorneys Christopher P. Canova of the Northern District of Florida, Maria Chapa Lopez of the Middle District of Florida and Ariana Fajardo Orshan in the Southern District of Florida.

In an email chain released as part of the Department of State's Tuesday document dump, Citrus County Supervisor of Elections Susan Gill last week told DOS officials that a voter who received one of the cure affidavits with the wrong date had also received a call from a number identified as the Tallahassee office of the Florida Democratic Party, an indication the party was reaching out about her vote by mail ballot.

"When I called it, it is the Democratic Party of Florida," she said in a Nov. 8 email to DOS officials.

She went on to write that she thinks the incorrect date was used because whoever sent the cure affidavit mixed up the deadline for cure affidavits with the deadline for provisional ballots. But, she said, "a bigger problem is the fact they actually changed one of the DOE forms."

That change to an official election form was what state officials turned over to federal prosecutors.

Another email included in the DOS document dump included correspondence from Okaloosa County Supervisor of Elections Paul Lux, who also said he believed the affidavits were from the Florida Democratic Party.

But the media will keep on pushing its "accused without evidence" meme anyway.

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