The FBI Targeting the President is a Coup

Suppose, after Bill Clinton fired William Sessions, the FBI had decided to go after him. We know what the media's response would have been. 

Now we have a black and white admission that the FBI went after President Trump for a nonsensical conspiracy theory put out by the Clinton campaign after he fired Comey.

This is a huge problem.

Forget the whole D and R thing for a moment. Start thinking about Rome instead and the Praetorian Guard. 

We have elected officials for a reason. They're not immune to criminal charges. But there's a huge difference between a Federal law enforcement agency investigating a crime. And a Federal law enforcement agency deciding to launch an investigation of the President of the United States specifically after he fired their boss.

Is the entire FBI tainted? Not in this regard.

The FBI suffered from politicized leadership. It still does. But it also suffers from political entanglements and a good deal of institutional arrogance. It takes a lot of entanglements, such as those McCabe and co. had, to use the Bureau as a political weapon. But it also takes a great deal of institutional arrogance to respond to the loss of your Numero Uno with a full scale attack on the highest elected official.

That's not American. That's South American.

It's a coup.

That word gets thrown around a lot, but when police or military leadership take steps to remove the head of the government from office, that's a coup.

Literally.

What's at stake in resisting a coup goes beyond R and D. It's the fundamental question of a free country which chooses to have its government run by elected officials, not by unelected officials. 

The Democrats have championed this coup. But they might want to consider the dangerous precedent set by enlisting law enforcement to remove a president from office. 

The Romans learned the cost of employing the Praetorian Guard the hard way. America cannot allow the FBI to be used as a Praetorian Guard.

And while the Democrats are cheering now, they might want to consider that coups can run both ways.

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